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Kenneth Sean Chaplin and Jeffrey Montez de Oca

Over the past two seasons, African-American NFL players have protested against state violence in communities of color. Race-based protest movements in US sport are not new. They have taken many forms and functions, and have encompassed a broad range of actors/actresses who share similar visions and

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Brian Wilson and Nicolien VanLuijk

In this paper, we report findings from a study that examined Canadian mainstream media coverage of anti-Olympic protests occurring before and during the 2010 Vancouver Olympics. Our study included an experiment with a hybrid analytic approach, as we drew together Johan Galtung’s ( 1998 ) “peace

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Grace Yan, Ann Pegoraro and Nicholas M. Watanabe

Athletes’ involvement in activism has been a critical subject that illuminates the capabilities, meanings, and struggles of sport ( Agyemang, Singer, & DeLmore, 2010 ; Cunningham & Regan, 2012 ; Edwards, 1969 , 2016a , 2016b ; Hartmann, 2004 ). Recent athlete protests at a series of sporting

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Cole G. Armstrong, Theodore M. Butryn, Vernon L. Andrews and Matthew A. Masucci

The year 2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the medal-stand protest of John Carlos and Tommie Smith during the 1968 Mexico City Olympics ( Edwards, 1969 ). The protest has been viewed by many as a monumental moment in American history, an action deserving of celebration—including a statue depicting

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Kwame J.A. Agyemang, Brennan K. Berg and Rhema D. Fuller

John Carlos’ silent protest (i.e., institutional disruption) during the men’s 200-m medal ceremony at the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City. The following question guided our research: How do institutional actors reflect on and discuss acts that defy institutional rules and norms? We believe research

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Qingru Xu and Andrew C. Billings

On June 23, 2017, at the World Tour Platinum China Open, a top-tier table tennis tournament, three Chinese athletes—the top-three-ranked male table tennis players in the world—withdrew from their second-round singles matches to protest the sudden removal of Head Coach Liu Guoliang. The three

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Theresa Walton-Fisette

-San Francisco 49ers player, Colin Kaepernick, in his protests, during the national anthem, against police brutality as one example of racial injustice. Kaepernick has since been locked out of the league, even as kneeling in protest has continued with other players and across sports. Without a doubt, using the

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Harry Edwards

In 1968 I organized the Olympic Project for Human Rights. Its purpose was to carry out a black athletes’ boycott of the Mexico City Olympic Games in protest against racism in American sports in particular and American society in general. Those of us associated with OPHR were viciously attacked in the U.S. media for introducing politics into the Olympics. My response to these attacks was simple: “The Olympics are and have always been political!” My position on this issue has not changed, but now I am far from alone in my view.

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George H. Sage

The focus of this study is on the organizational dynamics, collective actions, and outcomes of a transnational advocacy network that was formed to protest the labor practices of Nike’s sport shoe factories in Asia. Transnational advocacy networks arise and are sustained with the intent of changing social conditions. The Nike transnational network sought to improve the lives of workers in Nike factories in Asia so that they have jobs that pay a living wage, have good working conditions, can organize on their own behalf, and are treated with dignity and respect. A broad theoretical perspective that emphasizes the determinant and interactive effects of the emergence, development, and accomplishments of the Nike transnational network is employed.

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Peter Millward and George Poulton

This article explores the establishment and development of fan-owned association football club, F.C. United of Manchester. It does this by drawing upon extensive ethnographic fieldwork, including interviews, observations and an analysis of multiple texts, such as fanzines, web-based and media reports materials and discusses this using Herbert Blumer’s theory of collective behavior. As such, the article addresses two research questions: first, what the empirical case example of F.C. United of Manchester offers to the critical understanding of Blumer’s theory and second, what the theory can give to the understanding of twenty-first century protests in popular culture. Therefore this article contributes to contemporary debates on association football fandom, social movements and the theories of Herbert Blumer.