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Mikihiro Sato, Jeremy S. Jordan and Daniel C. Funk

related to promoting population health ( Chalip, 2006 ; Inoue, Berg, & Chelladurai, 2015 ). A beneficial means to understand physical activity behaviors is through the construct of psychological involvement, which refers to the extent that an individual perceives a connection with the activity

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Mohsen Behnam, Mikihiro Sato, Bradley J. Baker, Vahid Delshab and Mathieu Winand

individuals’ psychological involvement. In turn, individual preferences and needs are key antecedents of psychological involvement ( Funk, Ridinger, & Moorman, 2004 ; Iwasaki & Havitz, 1998 ). CKM allows sport organizations to optimize service offerings based on customer needs and interests, thereby

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Heather Kennedy, Bradley J. Baker, Jeremy S. Jordan and Daniel C. Funk

characteristics observed in previous literature and how these relationships have changed over time. To do so, the next section reviews literature on involvement as well as long-distance runners and their characteristics. Literature Review Psychological Involvement Previous researchers have identified

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Christine E. Wegner, Jeremy S. Jordan, Daniel C. Funk and Brianna Soule Clark

In the current study the researchers investigated the creation of an identity for Black female runners through their psychological and behavioral involvement in a national running organization for Black women. A repeated measures design was used with 756 members, surveying them twice over a 14-month period regarding their involvement both with the organization and with the activity of running. We found that members’ psychological and behavioral involvement with running increased over time, and that this change was more salient for members who did not consider themselves runners before they joined the organization. These findings provide initial support for the facilitation of a running identity through membership in this running organization.

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Jacqueline McDowell, Yung-Kuei Huang and Arran Caza

This study tested newly advanced theoretical predications about mechanisms by which authentic leadership has its positive effects on players’ psychological resources and team engagement. Specifically, we tested a mediation model, in which positive climate is the key social mechanism by which authentic leaders influence followers’ psychological capital and team engagement. Moreover, we examined the role of leader–follower characteristics in authentic leadership dynamics, particularly the role of race and gender. Quantitative data were obtained from 119 student-athletes representing 15 NCAA Division I men’s and women’s basketball teams. Results indicate that positive team climate mediated the relationships between authentic leadership and players’ psychological capital and engagement, and this relationship was moderated by gender. Results are discussed relative to the effects of gendered leadership, and implications for coaches and authentic leadership theory are presented.

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Mikihiro Sato, Jeremy S. Jordan and Daniel C. Funk

The current study examines whether a distance running event has the capacity to promote participants’ life satisfaction. The construct of psychological involvement was used to investigate the impact of attitude change through event preparation and subsequent activity. Data were collected four times through online surveys from running event participants (N = 211) over a five-month period. Latent growth modeling analyses revealed that participants’ life satisfaction peaked immediately after the event before receding, indicating that event participation exerted a positive impact on participants’ evaluations toward their lives. A positive significant association was also found between change in pleasure in running and change in life satisfaction. Findings from this study provide empirical support that a distance running event can serve as an environmental determinant that enhances participants’ life satisfaction by providing positive experiences through event participation and forming psychological involvement in physical activity.

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Yuhei Inoue, Daniel Funk and Jeremy S. Jordan

The current study investigated the role of running involvement in helping improve the lives of a homeless population through an examination of a community-based program that utilizes running as a means to promote self-sufficiency. Data collected from 148 individuals before and after their participation in the program for one month revealed participants increased their psychological involvement in running. A regression analysis further indicated that the participants’ perceived self-sufficiency from participating in the program was significantly explained by the extent of their increase in running involvement. These findings highlight the role of enhanced involvement in sport, in particular in the form of running, in creating important psychological benefits for homeless individuals, and provide theoretical implications for the literature on sport-for-development.

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.2018-0071 jsm.2018-0071 New Brands: Contextual Differences and Development of Brand Associations Over Time Jason Daniels * Thilo Kunkel * Adam Karg * 33 2 133 147 10.1123/jsm.2018-0218 jsm.2018-0218 Behavioral Correlates of Psychological Involvement: A 2-Year Study Mikihiro Sato * Jeremy S

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.2019-0404 jsm.2019-0404 Connecting Customer Knowledge Management and Intention to Use Sport Services Through Psychological Involvement, Commitment, and Customer Perceived Value Mohsen Behnam * Mikihiro Sato * Bradley J. Baker * Vahid Delshab * Mathieu Winand * 21 06 2020 1 11 2020 34 6 591

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Dan Cason, Minkyo Lee, Jaedeock Lee, In-Sung Yeo and Edward J. Arner

motivation and psychological involvement with a team were more likely to report that wagering would have an impact on their wagering behavior. As for the impact on fan experience, respondents who were identified as having a high fandom and economic motivation indicated that placing a bet would add excitement