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Jessica J. DeGaetano, Andrew T. Wolanin, Donald R. Marks, and Shiloh M. Eastin

The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of psychosocial factors and psychological flexibility on rehabilitation protocol adherence in a sample of injured collegiate athletes. Self-report measures were given to injured athletes before the start of a physical rehabilitation protocol. Upon completion of rehabilitation, each athlete was assessed by the chief athletic trainer using a measure of rehabilitation adherence. Correlational analyses and bootstrapped logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine whether broad psychosocial factors and level of psychological flexibility predicted engagement and adherence to a rehabilitation protocol. Psychological flexibility, as measured on the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (2nd ed.; Bond et al., 2011), contributed significantly to the overall logistic regression model. Study findings suggested that assessment of psychological flexibility could give medical providers a way to evaluate both quickly and quantitatively potentially problematic behavioral responding among injured athletes, allowing for more effective adherence monitoring.

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Matthew Jenkins, Elaine A. Hargreaves, and Ken Hodge

mindfulness-based construct of psychological flexibility ( Hayes, Strosahl, & Wilson, 2011 ) has been proposed as one such factor ( Butryn, Arigo, Raggio, Kaufman, Kerrigan, & Forman, 2015 ). Psychological flexibility is defined as “the ability to contact the present moment more fully as a conscious human

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Tobias Lundgren, Gustaf Reinebo, Markus Näslund, and Thomas Parling

cognition ( Hayes, Barnes-Holmes, & Roche, 2001 ). ACT aims to promote psychological flexibility (PF) in order to help individuals to live in concordance with personal values and goals ( Hayes et al., 1999 ). PF is defined as persisting or changing actions towards chosen goals or values while consciously

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Daniel Birrer

constructive response to stress ( Hayes, 2004 ), which is supported by recent research ( Chang, Wu, Kuo, & Chen, 2018 ) suggesting that psychological flexibility prevents emotional exhaustion in subjects with high levels of athletic identity. References Abele-Brehm , A. , & Brehm , A. ( 1986 ). Zur

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Matthew Jenkins, Elaine A. Hargreaves, and Ken Hodge

crucial in efforts to promote PA within the wider population ( Biddle & Nigg, 2000 ). Evidence also points to the processes of acceptance and commitment (derived from the larger construct of psychological flexibility), as being supports for long-term PA, which some researchers have ascribed to the

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Kendahl M. Shortway, Andrew Wolanin, Jennifer Block-Lerner, and Donald Marks

, & Wilson, 2012 ). Together these processes foster psychological flexibility, or, “the ability to contact the present moment more fully as a conscious human being, and to change or persist in behavior when doing so serves valued ends” ( Hayes, Luoma, Bond, Masuda, & Lillis, 2006 , p. 7). Increased

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David Price, Christopher R.D. Wagstaff, and Richard C. Thelwell

adopted an ACT approach with the aim of changing the relationship Alfie has with his inner experiences (e.g., thoughts, feelings) by targeting the six core processes of the Hexaflex model to promote psychological flexibility. ACT is a third-wave CBT approach rooted in the research paradigm of contextual

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Martin J. Turner, Gillian Aspin, Faye F. Didymus, Rory Mack, Peter Olusoga, Andrew G. Wood, and Richard Bennett

, high in confidence, relaxed, in flow, etc.), ACT approaches seek to change the relationship an individual has with internal experiences. ACT uses “acceptance and mindfulness processes and commitment and behavioral activation processes to produce psychological flexibility” ( Hayes et al., 2012 , p. 97

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Chris Hartley

/30  Valued action 28/48 40/48  Global psychological flexibility (total) 53/138 102/138 Thought Diary I provided Mel with an adapted ACT “Getting Hooked” worksheet ( Harris, 2009 ), which she completed after training and competitions (see Appendix ). This Thought Diary enabled me to gather and examine

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Kim Gammage, Desi McEwan, Lori Dithurbide, Alison Ede, Karl Erickson, Blair Evans, Larkin Lamarche, Sean Locke, Eric Martin, and Kathleen Wilson

-regulation, emotion regulation, psychological flexibility, and/or attention. Relative to the physical activity context, mindfulness training could seek to focus attention on and help regulate painful or uncomfortable sensations during exercise. It could also be used to help novice exercisers accept the struggle of