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Chih-Hsiang Yang and David E. Conroy

Mindful walking has emerged as a potential intervention strategy to improve mental health and promote well-being in adult and clinical populations. This strategy has not been implemented specifically with older adults to date. This study evaluated the feasibility, acceptability, sustainability, and preliminary efficacy of a mindful walking program for reducing negative affect in older adults. Community-dwelling older adults (n = 29) completed a 1-month, outdoor mindful walking program distributed across eight 30-min sessions. Responses from postprogram and follow-up questionnaires revealed that mindful walking was well-accepted, highly valued, and maintained after the program ended. Analysis from the pre- and postwalk surveys also suggested the preliminary efficacy of a mindful walking program for reducing negative affect. Positive results identified in the current feasibility study indicate readiness for randomized controlled trials to further examine the efficacy and effectiveness of a mindful walking intervention for promoting health and well-being in older populations.

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Alain P. Gauthier, Michel Lariviere, Raymond Pong, Susan Snelling and Nancy Young

Background:

Researchers have recently expressed their concern for the health of Francophones and rural dwellers in Canada. Their levels of physical activity may explain part of the observed differences. However, little is known about the physical activity levels of these 2 groups. The purpose of this study was to assess levels of physical activity among a sample of Francophones and rural dwellers. The study also assessed the associations of various types of physical activity to measures of health status.

Methods:

A quota-based convenience sample of 256 adults from Northern Ontario was surveyed using the IPAQ and the SF-12.

Results:

There were no significant differences in activity levels between language groups (P = .06) or geographical groups (P = .22) on the combined dependent variables based on MANOVA. Leisure-time physical activity scores were consistently associated to better physical component summary scores of the SF-12.

Conclusions:

Implications for practice include that leisure-time physical activities have been at the forefront of public health promotion, and our findings support this approach. Further, population specific interventions are indeed important, however, within this Canadian context when identifying target groups one must look beyond sociocultural status or geographical location.

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Marko T. Kantomaa, Tuija Tammelin, Hanna Ebeling, Emmanuel Stamatakis and Anja Taanila

Background:

Adolescent self-rated health is a strong predictor of future illness. In this study we investigated whether physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness are associated with self-rated health among adolescents aged 16 years.

Methods:

The study sample comprised 7,063 adolescents from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 (NFBC 1986) who responded to a postal questionnaire in 2001 to 2002. Self-rated health was measured by a single-item question, while physical activity was evaluated by a set of questions concerning the intensity and volume of physical activity outside school hours. Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured with a submaximal cycle ergometer test. Odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for good self-rated health were obtained from multinomial logistic regression.

Results:

High levels of physical activity (boys: OR 5.50, 95% CI 3.16 to 9.58; girls: OR 4.25, 95% CI 2.37 to 7.61) and cardiorespiratory fitness (boys: OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.05 to 3.24; girls: OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.47 to 4.66) were associated with very good self-rated health in adolescents.

Conclusions:

High levels of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness are positively associated with adolescents’ self-rated health. Public health promotion activities that foster physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness may benefit young people’s overall health and well-being.

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the Physical Activity Impacts of ‘Natural Experiments’ in Modifying the Built Environment David Ogilvie * Billie Giles-Corti * Paula Hooper * Lin Yang * Fiona Bull * 1 2010 7 s3 S341 S355 10.1123/jpah.7.s3.s341 Track 4: Community & Public Health Promotion Strategies Powerful Partnering

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Rebecca Reynolds, Santhya and David Menzies

though the national Heart Foundation highlighted the need for one in 2015. 20 Reduced governmental funding for physical activity public health promotion meant that members needed to prioritize their own funding before that of the alliance’s. Alternative avenues for support for both members and the

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Derek T. Smith, Tannah Broman, Marcus Rucker, Cecile Sende and Sarah Banner

structures have had to adapt. Effective preparation for physical therapy school requires significantly different coursework and experiences than does effective preparation for a career in strength and conditioning, physical activity public health promotion, or doctoral studies in exercise and proteomics. To

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Pamela K. Samra, Amanda L. Rebar, Lynne Parkinson, Jannique G.Z. van Uffelen, Stephanie Schoeppe, Deborah Power, Anthony Schneiders, Corneel Vandelanotte and Stephanie Alley

particularly at risk for insufficient activity, they were seemingly well aware of the benefits of activity. As such, these findings seem to highlight that public health promotion efforts should shift from persuasion of why people should be active to how to be active. Interventions could provide information

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Katelyn Esmonde and Shannon Jette

discourses of environmentalism, public health promotion, and public transit—all of which were not guaranteed to be connected in this case. Following Millington and Wilson’s ( 2017 ) call for PCS to move beyond an anthropocentric focus to explore the agency of non-humans, we examine how sociomaterialisms can

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Salomé Aubert, Joel D. Barnes, Megan L. Forse, Evan Turner, Silvia A. González, Jakub Kalinowski, Peter T. Katzmarzyk, Eun-Young Lee, Reginald Ocansey, John J. Reilly, Natasha Schranz, Leigh M. Vanderloo and Mark S. Tremblay

with parents and the general public and contributing to public health promotion on physical activity (19%) and because it engages people at a global level for international cooperation, the exchange of good practices, and global networking (15%). Similarly, in 2018, after the release of the Global

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Richard J. Keegan, Lisa M. Barnett, Dean A. Dudley, Richard D. Telford, David R. Lubans, Anna S. Bryant, William M. Roberts, Philip J. Morgan, Natasha K. Schranz, Juanita R. Weissensteiner, Stewart A. Vella, Jo Salmon, Jenny Ziviani, Anthony D. Okely, Nalda Wainwright and John R. Evans

(and/or sedentary behavior) 5 Children and youth sport (participation, benefits) 5 Assessment and measurement 5 Preventive medicine and/or public health promotion 4 Motivation 4 Motor development and skill acquisition 3 Physical self-perceptions 3 Elite sports and high performance 3 Physiotherapy