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Erika Hunt and Sandra Short

Objective:

To study athletes perceptions of adhesive ankle taping.

Design:

A qualitative study where athletes were interviewed regarding adhesive ankle taping.

Setting:

The University of North Dakota in Grand Forks, ND, USA.

Participants:

Eleven collegiate athletes, all currently taping their ankles, representative of three groups: recent injury, past injury, and no prior injury.

Results:

Taping resulted in feelings of increased confidence, increased strength, and decreased anxiety for injury or reinjury. Differences were found in responses given by the participants in the three groups.

Conclusions:

Taping has a psychological impact on athletes. Athletic trainers should make sure they educate athletes about the uses and functions of adhesive tape.

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Corien Peeters, Hannah Marchand, Heather Tulloch, Ron J. Sigal, Gary S. Goldfield, Stasia Hadjiyannakis, and Glen P. Kenny

Background:

Purpose was to examine experiences of obese youth aged 14 to 18 years during their participation in the Healthy Eating, Aerobic, and Resistance Exercise in Youth (HEARTY) randomized controlled exercise trial.

Methods:

A longitudinal qualitative approach was used to investigate youths’ experiences across time points in the trial: 3-weeks (run-in phase; n = 44, 52% males), 3-months (midpoint; n = 25), and 6-months (end of intervention; n = 24). Participants completed telephone interviews on perceived exercise facilitators, barriers, outcomes, and program preferences. Responses were subject to content analyses and are reported as frequencies.

Results:

Participants joined the trial initially to lose weight, but focused more on fitness over time. Exercise behavior was influenced by a sense of achieving results, and by family and peers (ie, supportive comments, transportation). At 6-months, the most commonly perceived changes were improved fitness (50%) and appearance (46%). Suggested changes to the HEARTY trial included initial guidance by a trainer, and more varied and group-based activity.

Conclusions:

Exercise facilitators, barriers and perceived changes in an exercise trial are reported. Access to a gym, initial direction by a trainer, variety, and group-based activities were reported as desired components of an exercise intervention. Findings also point to the importance of involving family and peer supports.

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Cody D. Neshteruk, Deborah J. Jones, Asheley Skinner, Alice Ammerman, Deborah F. Tate, and Dianne S. Ward

activity, fathers’ activity tends to be more often associated with child activity; however, results are mixed, 10 , 11 indicating fathers likely influence children’s physical activity through other mechanisms. Qualitative studies exploring fathers’ physical activity behaviors have shown that fathers

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Trevor Cote, Amy Baltzell, and Robert Diehl

how to improve the delivery of the interventions. To date, there have only been a few qualitative studies conducted with MBIs in sport to understand athletes’ perceptions of their experience. In Thompson et al.’s ( 2011 ) 1-year follow-up of recreational athletes (mean age 48) who participated in MSPE

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Kurtis Pankow, Amber D. Mosewich, and Nicholas L. Holt

factors and preferences), localized views of crisis, and rational appeals. Pankow et al. ( 2018 ) explored CIP leadership in six award-winning model youth football coaches in Canada. They used deductive qualitative analysis to code the coaches into CIP leadership styles based on the 10 leader behaviors

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Katherine Sveinson, Larena Hoeber, and Caroline Heffernan

, issue 1) have urged scholars to push qualitative research into new frontiers and engage in contemporary qualitative methods. In an effort to contribute to this movement, we encourage the use and application of critical discourse analysis (CDA). As a branch of discourse analysis (DA), which refers to

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Lindsey Brett, Victoria Traynor, Paul Stapley, and Shahla Meedya

reversing or slowing the physical decline of individuals living with dementia in nursing homes. To understand why physical exercise levels are low in nursing homes it is important to consider how physical exercise is perceived and whether it is feasible in this setting. Using qualitative methods, a deeper

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Erin J. Reifsteck, Jamian D. Newton, Melinda B. Smith, DeAnne Davis Brooks, and Shelby N. Anderson

their physical activity. The use of qualitative methodologies in sport psychology research can facilitate exploration of individual processes and experiences and offer a means to better understand how athletes make sense of their physical activity during transition ( Kerr & Dacyshyn, 2000 ; Plateau et

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Kurtis Pankow, Amber D. Mosewich, and Nicholas L. Holt

the CIP leadership styles best described these coaches? and What events and experiences did coaches perceive contributed to the development of their leadership style? Method Parry, Mumford, Bower, and Watts ( 2014 ) suggested that qualitative research approaches may be useful for exploring the

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Markus Schäfer and Catharina Vögele

happening in the field and on the other hand, it can inspire future research and new generations of researchers. In principle, content analyses in sport communication can follow either a quantitative or a qualitative research logic and focus, for example, on different research topics, communication material