Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for :

  • "quantifying internal training load" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Anthony N. Turner, Conor Buttigieg, Geoff Marshall, Angelo Noto, James Phillips and Liam Kilduff

Session rating of perceived exertion (sRPE) is known to significantly relate to heart-rate (HR) -based methods of quantifying internal training load (TL) in a variety of sports. However, to date this has not been investigated in fencing and was therefore the aim of this study. TL was calculated by multiplying the sRPE with exercise duration and through HR-based methods calculated using Banister and Edwards TRIMP. Seven male elite foil fencers (mean ± SD age 22.3 ± 1.6 y, height 181.3 ± 6.5 cm, body mass 77.7 ± 7.6 kg) were monitored over the period of 1 competitive season. The sRPE and HR of 67 training sessions and 3 competitions (87 poule bouts and 12 knockout rounds) were recorded and analyzed. Correlation analysis was used to determine any relationships between sRPE- and HR-based methods, accounting for individual variation, mode of training (footwork drills vs sparring sessions), and stage of competition (poules vs knockouts). Across 2 footwork sessions, sRPE and Banister and Edwards TRIMP were found to be reliable, with coefficient of variation values of 6.0%, 5.2%, and 4.5%, respectively. Significant correlations with sRPE for individual fencers (r = .84–.98) and across mode of exercise (r = .73–.85) and competition stages (r = .82–.92) were found with HR-based measures. sRPE is a simple and valuable tool coaches can use to quantify TL in fencing.

Restricted access

Helen Alexiou and Aaron J. Coutts

Purpose:

The purpose of this study was to compare the session-RPE method for quantifying internal training load (TL) with various HR-based TL quantification methods in a variety of training modes with women soccer players.

Methods:

Fifteen elite women soccer players took part in the study (age: 19.3 ± 2.0 y and VO2max: 50.8 ± 2.7 mL·kg−1·min−1). Session-RPE, heart rate, and duration were recorded for 735 individual training sessions and matches over a period of 16 wk. Correlation analysis was used to compare session-RPE TLs with three commonly used HR-based methods for assessing TL.

Results:

The mean correlation for session-RPE TL with Banister’s TRIMP, LTzone TL and Edwards’s TL were (r = 0.84, 0.83, and 0.85, all P < .01, respectively). Correlations for session-RPE TL and three HR-based methods separated by session type were all significant (all P < .05). The strongest correlations were reported for technical (r = 0.68 to 0.82), conditioning (r = 0.60 to 0.79), and speed sessions (r = 0.61 to 0.79).

Conclusion:

The session-RPE TL showed a significant correlation with all training types common to soccer. Higher correlations were found with less intermittent, aerobic-based training sessions and suggest that HR-based TLs relate better to session-RPE TLs in less intermittent training activities. These results support previous findings showing that the session-RPE TL compares favorably with HR-based methods for quantifying internal TL in a variety of soccer training activities.

Restricted access

Robert H. Mann, Craig A. Williams, Bryan C. Clift and Alan R. Barker

-based criterion measures. Table 5 Correlations Between sRPE, dRPE-L, dRPE-B, and Each of the Individualized Heart-Rate-Based Methods of Quantifying Internal Training Load TRIMP I TRIMP E TRIMP L r ±90% CL Qualitative inference r ±90% CL Qualitative inference r ±90% CL Qualitative inference sRPE 0 .88 .12 Most

Restricted access

Monoem Haddad, Johnny Padulo and Karim Chamari

Despite various contributing factors, session rating of perceived exertion has the potential to affect a large proportion of the global sporting and clinical communities since it is an inexpensive and simple tool that is highly practical and accurately measures an athlete’s outcome of training or competition. Its simplicity can help optimize performance and reduce negative outcomes of hard training in elite athletes.

Restricted access

Carlo Minganti, Laura Capranica, Romain Meeusen and Maria Francesca Piacentini

Purpose:

The aim of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of perceived exertion (session-RPE) in quantifying internal training load in divers.

Methods:

Six elite divers, three males (age, 25.7 ± 6.1 y; stature, 1.71 ± 0.06 m; body mass, 66.7 ± 1.2 kg) and three females (age, 25.3 ± 0.6 y; stature, 1.63 ± 0.05 m; body mass, 58.3 ± 4.0 kg) were monitored during six training sessions within a week, which included 1 m and 3 m springboard dives. The Edwards summated heart rate zone method was used as a reference measure; the session-RPE rating was obtained using the CR-10 Borg scale modified by Foster and the 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS).

Results:

Significant correlations were found between CR-10 and VAS session-RPE and the Edwards summated heart rate zone method for training sessions (r range: 0.71–0.96; R 2 range: 0.50–0.92; P < 0.01) and for divers (r range: 0.67–0.96; R 2 range: 0.44–0.92; P < 0.01).

Conclusions:

These findings suggest that session-RPE can be useful for monitoring internal training load in divers.

Restricted access

Michele Lastella, Gregory D. Roach, Grace E. Vincent, Aaron T. Scanlan, Shona L. Halson and Charli Sargent

-based (27%) and running (4%) exercises. Data extracted from the training diaries allowed identification of training and rest days. Daily data were used to quantify internal training load using the sRPE method developed by Foster et al. 21 Specifically, players recorded the start and end time for each

Restricted access

Håvard Wiig, Thor Einar Andersen, Live S. Luteberget and Matt Spencer

within the same player suggests that sRPE-TL is a valid tool quantifying internal training load, in accordance with existing literature. 6 – 8 Session rating of perceived exertion training load had the strongest relationship with the external load variables with no threshold or low intensity

Restricted access

Thiago S. Duarte, Danilo L. Alves, Danilo R. Coimbra, Bernardo Miloski, João C. Bouzas Marins and Maurício G. Bara Filho

quantifying internal training load in women soccer players . Int J Sports Physiol Perform . 2008 ; 3 ( 3 ): 320 – 330 . PubMed ID: 19211944 doi:10.1123/ijspp.3.3.320 19211944 10.1123/ijspp.3.3.320 3. Scanlan AT , Wen N , Tucker PS , Borges NR , Dalbo VJ . Training mode’s influences on the

Restricted access

Adam Douglas, Michael A. Rotondi, Joseph Baker, Veronica K. Jamnik and Alison K. Macpherson

, Rundell KW . Evaluation of cardiovascular demands of game play and practice in women’s ice hockey . J Strength Cond Res . 2003 ; 17 ( 2 ): 329 – 333 . 12741872 26. Alexiou H , Coutts AJ . A comparison of methods used for quantifying internal training load in women soccer players . Int J Sports

Restricted access

Nils Haller, Tobias Ehlert, Sebastian Schmidt, David Ochmann, Björn Sterzing, Franz Grus and Perikles Simon

): 79 – 84 . PubMed ID: 18068433 doi:10.1016/j.jsams.2007.08.005 10.1016/j.jsams.2007.08.005 18068433 42. Alexiou H , Coutts AJ . A comparison of methods used for quantifying internal training load in women soccer players . Int J Sports Physiol Perform . 2008 ; 3 ( 3 ): 320 – 330 . PubMed ID