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John N. Singer

Sport management scholars must begin to recognize the significance of race and ethnicity as viable epistemological considerations in research inquiry. This article discusses the concept of “epistemological racism” (Scheurich & Young, 1997) and argues that critical race theory (CRT) is a legitimate epistemological and theoretical alternative to research approaches that have typically been based on the dominant worldview (i.e., Eurocentrism), and that it is an appropriate framework for conducting race-based emancipatory research in sport management. In particular, because CRT focuses on issues of justice, liberation, and the empowerment of people of color in a society based on White supremacy (i.e., Eurocentrism), the primary purpose of this article is to provide sport management scholars and students with insight into how CRT’s epistemological and methodological bases could be applied to critical areas of research in our field. The article concludes with some practical suggestions for how we can address epistemological racism in our sport management research and education.

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James A. Mathisen and Gerald S. Mathisen

This article provides a sociorhetorical analysis of the April 25, 1989, NBC telecast of “Black Athletes—Fact and Fiction.” It applies Toulmin’s (1958) model of the structure of argumentation to identify the major claims, data, and warrants Tom Brokaw used to construct the program and argues that a racist rhetorical structure resulted. We posit that the racism lay in the claims Brokaw made, the data he utilized, the inferences he drew from selected sources, and the absence of alternative explanations. The sociological implications of such a racist rhetorical structure are explored.

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Robert Turick, Anthony Weems, Nicholas Swim, Trevor Bopp and John N. Singer

and blossom into a more just sporting landscape. Furthermore, educating current sport management students on the tangible legacy of systemic racism in intercollegiate athletics could better prepare them to lead future efforts for adequately addressing racism in sport organizations more broadly. This

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Kerry R. McGannon and Ted M. Butryn

In this study, scholarship was extended on the cultural meanings of race and athlete activism by interrogating one key media spectacle surrounding athlete protests: President Trump’s 2017 speech questioning the National Football League (NFL) players’ character, with a focus on NFL owners’ responses. The NFL owners’ statements (n = 32) were subjected to critical discourse analysis. Discourses of post-racial nationalism and functionalism and the subject positions of “good player citizen” and “benevolent facilitator” (re)created meanings of the protests devoid of racial politics, linked to ideologies of color blindness, meritocracy, and diversity. These discourses and subject positions allowed the NFL owners to control protest meanings to maintain White privilege and appeal to their White fan base. These findings expand research on color-blind racism in sport, which perpetuates neoliberal ideals and the myth of a post-racial America, via taken-for-granted language use within discourses.

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-Work as an Interpretive Methodology for Sport Management Pirkko Markula * Lorraine A. Friend * 10 2005 19 4 442 463 10.1123/jsm.19.4.442 Addressing Epistemological Racism in Sport Management Research John N. Singer * 10 2005 19 4 464 479 10.1123/jsm.19.4.464 A Typology of Approaches to Comparative

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.2.152 The Integration of Central Positions in Baseball: The Black Shortstop John C. Phillips * 6 1991 8 2 161 167 10.1123/ssj.8.2.161 Comments The Rhetoric of Racism in Sport: Tom Brokaw Revisited James A. Mathisen * Gerald S. Mathisen * 6 1991 8 2 168 177 10.1123/ssj.8.2.168 Research How Do We Find

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Jamie Cleland, Keith Parry and David Radford

understanding of “race”, racism and anti-racism in sport . International Review for the Sociology of Sport, 45 ( 3 ), 335 – 354 . doi:10.1177/1012690210371045 10.1177/1012690210371045 Jones , C. , & Fleming , S. ( 2007 ). “I’d rather wear a turban than a rose”: A case study of the ethics of chanting

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C. Keith Harrison, Rhema Fuller, Whitney Griffin, Scott Bukstein, Danielle McArdle and Steven Barnhart

careers?” ( Bimper et al., 2012 , p. 108). The answer can be found in CRT with its focus on issues of justice, liberation , and the empowerment of people of color in a society based on Eurocentrism (i.e., white supremacy). In light of Singer’s ( 2005a ) influential work on addressing racism in sport

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John N. Singer, Sally Shaw, Larena Hoeber, Nefertiti Walker, Kwame J. A. Agyemang and Kyle Rich

imagine they would have provided keen insights and provocative perspectives had they participated in this panel discussion with us. But in thinking about the present state and future of qualitative inquiry in our field, I am still quite concerned about epistemological racism in sport management research

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Joshua D. Vadeboncoeur, Trevor Bopp and John N. Singer

henceforth convey the systematic ramifications of racism within the sporting context. Moreover, CRT has allowed these researchers to offer evocative contributions to what is known (and unknown) about race and racism in sport (e.g.,  Bimper & Harrison, 2017 ; Carter & Hart, 2010 ; Cooper, Nwadike