Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 15 items for :

  • "redox status" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Thiago Correa Porto Gonçalves, Atila Alexandre Trapé, Jhennyfer Aline Lima Rodrigues, Simone Sakagute Tavares and Carlos Roberto Bueno Junior

and haplotypes in women aged 50–79 years. Our main result suggests that the ancestral haplotype β 2 -AR Arg16Arg/Gln27Gln presented improvements (BP, body composition, aerobic capacity, and redox status) in more variables compared with the other groups in response to the multicomponent program. We

Restricted access

Rameswar Pal, Som Nath Singh, Kaushik Halder, Omveer Singh Tomer, Awadh Bihari Mishra and Mantu Saha

Background:

This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of yogic practice on resting metabolism and redox status.

Methods:

The study was conducted on 64 physically trained male volunteers selected randomly at the Air Force Academy. The yoga group (n = 34) practiced yogasana, pranayama, and meditation for 3 months (February–May 2011) and the control group (n = 30) performed physical training. Antioxidant variables in blood samples along with physiological parameters were estimated before and after 3 months.

Results:

No significant difference was noted between baseline data of the control group and yoga group. Reduced glutathione, vitamin C, and vitamin E; the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione; and total antioxidant status were increased significantly following yogic practice. Activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione reductase were significantly increased, whereas activity of glutathione peroxidase was significantly decreased following yogic practice. Oxidized glutathione decreased significantly following yogic practice. A nonsignificant decrease of hydroperoxides, protein carbonyl, malondialdehyde, and blood sugar was noted in the yoga group. Carbon dioxide elimination and peripheral oxygen saturation increased significantly following yogic practice. No significant changes were observed in the control group following 3 months of physical training.

Conclusions:

Regular yogic practice can improve resting metabolism and redox status of the practitioner.

Restricted access

Vitor Teixeira, Hugo Valente, Susana Casal, Franklim Marques and Pedro Moreira

Strenuous physical activity is known to generate reactive oxygen species to a point that can exceed the antioxidant defense system and lead to oxidative stress. Dietary intake of antioxidants, plasma enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase [Gr], and glutathione peroxidase [GPx]) activities, nonenzymatic (total antioxidant status [TAS], uric acid, α-tocopherol, retinol, α-carotene, β-carotene, lycopene, and lutein + zeaxanthin) antioxidants, and markers of lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituricacid-reactive substances [TBARS]) and muscle damage (creatine kinase [CK]) were measured in 17 elite male kayakers and canoeists under resting conditions and in an equal number of age- and sex-matched sedentary individuals. Athletes showed increased plasma values of α-tocopherol (p = .037), α-carotene (p = .003), β-carotene (p = .007), and superoxide dismutase activity (p = .002) and a lower TAS level (p = .030). Antioxidant intake (α-tocopherol, vitamin C, and β-carotene) and plasmatic GPx, Gr, lycopene, lutein + zeaxanthin, retinol, and uric acid levels were similar in both groups. Nevertheless, TBARS (p < .001) and CK (p = .011) levels were found to be significantly higher in the kayakers and canoeists. This work suggests that despite the enhanced levels of antioxidants, athletes undergoing regular strenuous exercise exhibited more oxidative stress than sedentary controls.

Restricted access

Alfredo Córdova, Antoni Sureda, María L. Albina, Victoria Linares, Montse Bellés and Domènec J. Sánchez

The aim was to determine the levels and activities of the oxidative stress markers in erythrocytes, plasma, and urine after a flat cyclist stage. Eight voluntary male professional trained-cyclists participated in the study. Exercise significantly increased erythrocyte, leukocyte, platelet, and reticulocyte counts. The exercise induced significant increases in the erythrocyte activities of catalase (19.8%) and glutathione reductase (19.2%), while glutathione peroxidase activity decreased significantly (29.3%). Erythrocyte GSSG concentration was significantly increased after exercise (21.4%), whereas GSH was significantly diminished (20.4%). Erythrocyte malondialdehyde levels evidenced a significant decrease 3 h after finishing the stage (44.3%). Plasma malondialdehyde, GSH and GSSG levels significantly decreased after 3 hr recovery (26.8%, 48.6%, and 31.1%, respectively). The exercise significantly increased the F2-isoprostane concentration in urine from 359 ± 71 pg/mg creatinine to 686 ± 139 pg/mg creatinine. In conclusion, a flat cycling stage induced changes in oxidative stress markers in erythrocytes, plasma, and urine of professional cyclists. Urine F2-isoprostane is a more useful biomarker for assessing the effects of acute exercise than the traditional malondialdehyde measurement.

Restricted access

Scott K. Powers, Ashley J. Smuder, Andreas N. Kavazis and Matthew B. Hudson

Research interest in the effects of antioxidants on exercise-induced oxidative stress and human performance continues to grow as new scientists enter this field. Consequently, there is a need to establish an acceptable set of criteria for monitoring antioxidant capacity and oxidative damage in tissues. Numerous reports have described a wide range of assays to detect both antioxidant capacity and oxidative damage to biomolecules, but many techniques are not appropriate in all experimental conditions. Here, the authors present guidelines for selecting and interpreting methods that can be used by scientists to investigate the impact of antioxidants on both exercise performance and the redox status of tissues. Moreover, these guidelines will be useful for reviewers who are assigned the task of evaluating studies on this topic. The set of guidelines contained in this report is not designed to be a strict set of rules, because often the appropriate procedures depend on the question being addressed and the experimental model. Furthermore, because no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate in every experimental situation, the authors strongly recommend using multiple assays to verify a change in biomarkers of oxidative stress or redox balance.

Restricted access

John C. Quindry, Steven R. McAnulty, Matthew B. Hudson, Peter Hosick, Charles Dumke, Lisa S. McAnulty, Dru Henson, Jason D. Morrow and David Nieman

Previous research indicates that ultramarathon exercise can result in blood oxidative stress. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the efficacy of oral supplementation with quercetin, a naturally occurring compound with known antioxidant properties, as a potential countermeasure against blood oxidative stress during an ultramarathon competition. In double-blind fashion, 63 participants received either oral quercetin (250 mg, 4×/day; 1,000 mg/day total) or quercetin-free supplements 3 weeks before and during the 160-km Western States Endurance Run. Blood drawn before and immediately after (quercetin finishers n = 18, quercetin-free finishers n = 21) the event was analyzed for changes in blood redox status and oxidative damage. Results show that quercetin supplementation did not affect race performance. In response to the ultramarathon challenge, aqueous-phase antioxidant capacity (ferric-reducing ability of plasma) was similarly elevated in athletes in both quercetin and quercetin-free treatments and likely reflects significant increases in plasma urate levels. Alternatively, trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity was not altered by exercise or quercetin. Accordingly, neither F2-isoprostances nor protein carbonyls were influenced by either exercise or quercetin supplementation. In the absence of postrace blood oxidative damage, these findings suggest that oral quercetin supplementation does not alter blood plasma lipid or aqueous-phase antioxidant capacity or oxidative damage during an ultramarathon challenge.

Restricted access

Zekine Lappalainen, Jani Lappalainen, David E. Laaksonen, Niku K.J Oksala, Savita Khanna, Chandan K. Sen and Mustafa Atalay

Thioredoxin (TRX) is a protein disulfide reductase that plays an important role in many thiol-dependent cellular reductive processes, antioxidant protection, and signal transduction. Moreover, TRX reduces and maintains the function of many proteins during oxidative stress, which is increased in diabetes. The authors recently reported that diabetes impairs brain redox status and TRX response to exercise training. As a continuation of their studies, they hypothesized that alpha-lipoic acid, a natural thiol antioxidant, has a favorable effect on the brain TRX and glutathione (GSH) system in diabetes. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes was used as a chronic model and exhaustive exercise as an acute model for disrupted redox balance. Half the diabetic and nondiabetic animals were subjected to a bout of exhaustive exercise after 8 wk with or without lipoic acid and analyzed for key thiol antioxidants. Lipoic acid neither altered diabetes-induced oxidative stress as assessed by the increased ratio of oxidized to total GSH nor had any impact on the antioxidant protein response to exercise. However, lipoic acid increased mRNA of TRX-interacting protein, an inhibitor of TRX-1, and glutaredoxin-1 in diabetes. Exercise increased TRX-1 mRNA in both diabetic and nondiabetic animals but had no effect on TRX-1 protein. Cytosolic superoxide dismutase mRNA was only increased in diabetes, whereas exercise increased the protein levels in nondiabetic animals. The findings suggest that exhaustive exercise induces mRNA of TRX-1 in the brain and that lipoic acid cannot prevent diabetes-induced disturbances in GSH homeostasis. Because lipoic acid increased TRX-interacting protein transcription in diabetes, high doses may impair TRX-1 homeostasis.

Restricted access

Hakonen * Tuija H. Tammelin * Urho M. Kujala * Vuokko Kovanen * Eija K. Laakkonen * 1 04 2020 04 10 2019 28 2 231 241 10.1123/japa.2019-0093 japa.2019-0093 Multicomponent Training Changes Blood Pressure and Redox Status in Older Women: Influence of β 2 Adrenergic Receptor Haplotypes Thiago Correa

Restricted access

12 4 569 578 10.1123/jpah.2013-0126 Effects of Yogic Practice on Metabolism and Antioxidant–Redox Status of Physically Active Males Rameswar Pal * Som Nath Singh * Kaushik Halder * Omveer Singh Tomer * Awadh Bihari Mishra * Mantu Saha * 4 2015 12 4 579 587 10.1123/jpah.2013-0059 The

Restricted access

Achraf Ammar, Stephen J. Bailey, Omar Hammouda, Khaled Trabelsi, Nabil Merzigui, Kais El Abed, Tarak Driss, Anita Hökelmann, Fatma Ayadi, Hamdi Chtourou, Adnen Gharbi and Mouna Turki

muscle damage and redox status in response to a weightlifting training session: effect of time-of-day . Physiol Int . 2016 ; 103 ( 2 ): 243 – 261 . PubMed ID: 28639862 28639862 21. Ammar A , Chtourou H , Trabelsi K , et al . Temporal specificity of training: intra-day effects on biochemical