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Danny M. Pincivero, Rachael R. Polen and Brittany N. Byrd

factors contributing to the reduction in muscle strength as a function of aging, 9 , 10 differences between sexes, 2 and the influence of chronic athletic and resistance training. 2 These previous studies, however, have often limited the investigation of the relationship between muscle size and force

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Louise Davis and Sophia Jowett

Grounded in Bowlby’s (1969/1982, 1988) attachment theory, this study aimed to explore (a) the pervasiveness of the three main functions of attachment within the context of the coach-athlete relationship, (b) the associations of athletes’ attachment styles with such important variables as satisfaction with the relationship and satisfaction with the sport, and (c) the process by which athletes’ attachment styles and satisfaction with sport are associated. Data were collected through self-report measures of attachment functions and styles as well as relationship satisfaction and sport satisfaction from 309 student athletes (males = 150, females = 159) whose age ranged from 18 to 28 years (Mage = 19.9, SD = 1.58 years). Athletes’ mean scores indicated that the coach was viewed as an attachment figure fulfilling all three functions of secure base, safe haven, and proximity maintenance. Bivariate correlations indicated that athletes’ avoidant and anxious styles of attachment with the coach were negatively correlated with both relationship satisfaction and sport satisfaction. Mediational regression analysis revealed that athletes’ satisfaction with the coach-athlete relationship may be a process that links athletes’ attachment styles with levels of satisfaction with sport. The findings from this study highlight the potential theoretical and practical utility of attachment theory in studying relationships within the sport context.

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Jeffrey B. Ruser, Mariya A. Yukhymenko-Lescroart, Jenelle N. Gilbert, Wade Gilbert and Stephanie D. Moore

-discipline, greater life satisfaction, connection to others, and positive relationships ( Wood, Froh, & Geraghty, 2010 ). Gratitude is defined as “the recognition that one is the beneficiary of another’s kind act” ( Lambert, Graham, & Fincham, 2009 , p. 1194). Drawing upon this significance, researchers have begun to

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Victoria McGee and J.D. DeFreese

individuals through both good and bad sport-related experiences ( Jowett & Shanmugam, 2016 ; Jowett & Wylleman, 2006 ). Thus, a deeper understanding of the impact the coach-athlete relationship has on specific athlete psychological outcomes including athlete burnout and engagement has potential theoretical

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John B. Nezlek, Marzena Cypryańska, Piotr Cypryański, Karolina Chlebosz, Karolina Jenczylik, Joanna Sztachańska and Anna M. Zalewska

examine such relationships. Participants in this study were recreational runners. Each week for 3 months they described how often and how far they had run that week, and they provided measures of their well-being. The analyses focused on within-person relationships between how much a person ran each week

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Irineu Loturco, Lucas A. Pereira, Ciro Winckler, Weverton L. Santos, Ronaldo Kobal and Michael McGuigan

The load–velocity relationship is widely recognized for its ability to accurately predict the 1-repetition maximum (1RM) in both lower-body and upper-body exercises. 1 – 3 With the data generated by linear-regression models, practitioners can frequently monitor and adjust the resistance

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Christopher Kuenze, Lisa Cadmus-Bertram, Karin Pfieffer, Stephanie Trigsted, Dane Cook, Caroline Lisee and David Bell

return to a healthy frequency, intensity, and volume of physical activity with the goal of promoting a positive outcome from an orthopedic as well as a broader health-based perspective. Developing a clearer understanding of the complex relationship between objective measures of MVPA, self

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Benjamin R. Wilson, Kaley E. Robertson, Jeremy M. Burnham, Michael C. Yonz, Mary Lloyd Ireland and Brian Noehren

injury risk. The Y Balance Test requires the subject to be able to control his or her body while maintaining a single-leg stance. Potentially, this requires adequate hip girdle strength to maintain stability of the pelvis and trunk throughout the test. Although relationships have been reported between

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Jesús J. Ruiz-Navarro, Pedro G. Morouço and Raúl Arellano

effectively apply force in the water and is highly associated with performance. On the contrary, the intracyclic velocity variation ( dv ) is one of the most applied parameters by academics and practitioners to evaluate the efficiency of swimmers, even though the relationship with performance is not

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Danny Lum and Abdul Rashid Aziz

have included either only dynamic strength measurements of the upper body 4 – 8 or isometric strength using kayak-specific movement. 3 , 9 , 10 Interestingly, only one study has endeavored to investigate the relationship between measures obtained from lower-limb strength assessment with sprint kayak