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Sebastian Altfeld, Paul Schaffran, Jens Kleinert, and Michael Kellmann

Paid coaches have to regularly deal with a range of potential stressors in the workplace. These stressors may include emotional and physical demands caused by the complex nature of coaching work. Many coaches have developed useful strategies to cope with these demands. Nevertheless, unexpected changes within the dynamic environment in which they typically operate (e.g., injury, public scrutiny, social media), problems with members of the board or management, continuous negative performance results, or personal factors may challenge the adequacy of coaches’ coping mechanisms. This inability to cope with these stresses can lead to a state of chronic stress. If that state manifests permanently, it can result in a state of emotional exhaustion, ultimately leading to coach burnout. The aim of this article is to define the burnout phenomenon and to provide a clear description of the triggering factors. Furthermore, ideas are presented to guide how coaches can protect themselves and how officials (club or association management) can reduce coaches’ burnout.

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Paul A. Estabrooks, Elizabeth H. Fox, Shawna E. Doerksen, Michael H. Bradshaw, and Abby C. King

The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of an on-site physical activity (PA) program offered with congregate meals. Study 1 surveyed meal-site users on their likelihood to participate. Study 2 used meal-site-manager interviews and site visits to determine organizational feasibility. Study 3, a controlled pilot study, randomized meal sites to a 12-week group-based social-cognitive (GBSC) intervention or a standard-care control. Studies 1 and 2 indicated that most meal-site users would participate in an on-site PA program, and meal sites had well-suited physical resources and strong organizational support for this type of program. In Study 3, GBSC participants increased their weekly PA over those in the control condition (p < .05, ES = .79). Results indicated that changes in task cohesion might have mediated intervention effectiveness. These studies demonstrate that a PA program offered in this venue is feasible, is effective in promoting PA, and could have a strong public health impact.

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Daniel Gould

The mission of the Institute for the Study of Youth Sports (ISYS) is to provide leadership, scholarship, and outreach that “transforms” the face of youth sports in ways that maximize the beneficial physical, psychological, and social effects of participation for children and youth while minimizing detrimental effects. Since its inception in 1978, ISYS has partnered with numerous organizations to promote healthy youth sports participation. In this article, the general steps ISYS takes to form and facilitate partnerships are addressed. Four long-term partnerships are also described. The services provided to these organizations are described and the advantages and challenges of working with partners, in general, are delineated. How these partnerships are used to facilitate the teaching, outreach-engagement, and scholarship components of the Michigan State University land grant mission are also described. The case of ISYS shows that conducting community outreach and engagement projects greatly enhance the scholarly mission of the university.

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Daniel Gould and Sean Pick

This review examines the development of sport psychology in the years 1920 to 1940, with particular emphasis on Coleman Griffith. Griffith was the most active person in the field in this era and was the first North American to devote a significant portion of his or her career to research, teaching, and service in sport psychology. The approach Griffith took in conceptualizing and studying sport psychology will also be emphasized. In essence, the most lasting legacy of Griffith is the research to practice orientation he epitomized that provides an excellent model for contemporary sport psychologists to emulate.

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Leah E. Robinson

Ainsworth, 2009 ; p. 89). The application of laboratory findings to real-world settings is the essence of translational research-to-practice. Twenty years later these sentiments are reiterated by Christina ( 2017 ), who emphasizes the need to translate research in kinesiology by putting the research into a

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Katie Slattery, Stephen Crowcroft, and Aaron J. Coutts

, optimal learning strategies), while coaches and athletes test the intervention’s effectiveness in the real world. Undoubtedly, coaches and athletes benefit from the work of researchers, but there are great benefits to be achieved by working together to bridge the gap from research to practice. We have

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Artur Direito, Joseph J. Murphy, Matthew Mclaughlin, Jacqueline Mair, Kelly Mackenzie, Masamitsu Kamada, Rachel Sutherland, Shannon Montgomery, Trevor Shilton, and on behalf of the ISPAH Early Career Network

disease advocacy. These models propose a variety of ways to mobilize political, media, professional, community, and organizational dimensions of advocacy to achieve the ultimate goal of translating research to practice and policy, while providing options for different actors becoming involved in research

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Pamela Haibach-Beach, Melanie Perreault, Lauren J. Lieberman, and Alexandra Stribing

Disabilities, 35 ( 10 ), 2577 – 2584 . PubMed ID: 25014271 doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2014.05.030 10.1016/j.ridd.2014.05.030 Haibach-Beach , P. , Perreault , M. , Foster , E. , & Lieberman , L. ( 2019 ). Gross motor skill performance in children with and without CHARGE syndrome: Research to practice

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Patricia Gaion, Michel Milistetd, Fernando Santos, Andressa Contreira, Luciane Arantes, and Nayara Caruzzo

provide insight on how PYD may be embedded within the Brazilian context face multiple challenges while developing “research to practice” initiatives. Stakeholders in Brazil often are not familiar with any findings from PYD-focused research projects, neither do they know any evidenced-based guidelines