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Beatriz Bachero-Mena, Miguel Sánchez-Moreno, Fernando Pareja-Blanco and Borja Sañudo

) the maximal velocity. 4 In a recent review, Alcaraz et al 5 suggested that resisted sprint training is an effective method for the development of sprint performance, mainly in the early acceleration phase (≤10 m), with little impact in the maximum velocity phase (≥20 m). Energy for muscle

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Jorge Carlos-Vivas, Jorge Perez-Gomez, Ola Eriksrud, Tomás T. Freitas, Elena Marín-Cascales and Pedro E. Alcaraz

velocity, and applied forces. Thus, it is not surprising that training routines in soccer include training methods that involve specific motor tasks, such as resisted sprint training (RST) or plyometrics. RST has been shown as an effective training method for enhancing performance, where athletes sprint

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Live S. Luteberget, Truls Raastad, Olivier Seynnes and Matt Spencer

Fast acceleration is an important performance factor in handball. In addition to traditional sprint training (TST), resisted-sprint training (RST) is a method often used to improve acceleration. However, studies on RST show conflicting results, and underlying mechanisms have not been studied.

Purpose:

To compare the effects of RST, by sled towing, against TST on sprint performance and muscle architecture.

Methods:

Participants (n = 18) were assigned to either RST or TST and completed 2 training sessions of RST or TST per week (10 wk), in addition to their normal team training. Sprint tests (10 and 30 m) and measurements of muscle architecture were performed pre- and posttraining.

Results:

Beneficial effects were found in the 30-m-sprint test for both groups (mean; ±90% CL: TST = −0.31; ±0.19 s, RST = −0.16; ±0.13 s), with unclear differences between the groups. Only TST had a beneficial effect on 10-m time (−0.04; ±0.04 s), with a likely difference between the 2 groups (85%, ES = 0.60). Both groups had a decrease in pennation angle (−6.0; ±3.3% for TST and −2.8; ±2.0% for RST), which had a nearly perfect correlation with percentage change in 10-m-sprint performance (r = .92). A small increase in fascicle length (5.3; ±3.9% and 4.0; ±2.1% for TST and RST, respectively) was found, with unclear differences between groups.

Discussion:

TST appears to be more effective than RST in enhancing 10-m-sprint time. Both groups showed similar effects in 30-m-sprint time. A similar, yet small, effect of sprint training on muscle architecture was observed in both groups.

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Fernando Pareja-Blanco, Eduardo Sáez de Villarreal, Beatriz Bachero-Mena, Ricardo Mora-Custodio, José Antonio Asián-Clemente, Irineu Loturco and David Rodríguez-Rosell

Resisted sprint training (RST) is a common training method employed to develop sprint performance, in which athletes mimic the traditional sprint movements (ie, unloaded sprints) with an added resistance. 1 Previous studies confirmed that this training strategy is able to induce positive transfer

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David Rodríguez-Osorio, Oliver Gonzalo-Skok and Fernando Pareja-Blanco

conditioning program emphasizes similar motor patterns and contraction types to those used in actual games. 10 In this regard, resisted sprint training, such as sled towing and weighted vest training, is commonly performed to enhance sprinting performance. 10 In fact, there are several studies that have

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Jean-Benoît Morin, George Petrakos, Pedro Jiménez-Reyes, Scott R. Brown, Pierre Samozino and Matt R. Cross

Background:

Sprint running acceleration is a key feature of physical performance in team sports, and recent literature shows that the ability to generate large magnitudes of horizontal ground-reaction force and mechanical effectiveness of force application are paramount. The authors tested the hypothesis that very-heavy loaded sled sprint training would induce an improvement in horizontal-force production, via an increased effectiveness of application.

Methods:

Training-induced changes in sprint performance and mechanical outputs were computed using a field method based on velocity–time data, before and after an 8-wk protocol (16 sessions of 10- × 20-m sprints). Sixteen male amateur soccer players were assigned to either a very-heavy sled (80% body mass sled load) or a control group (unresisted sprints).

Results:

The main outcome of this pilot study is that very-heavy sled-resisted sprint training, using much greater loads than traditionally recommended, clearly increased maximal horizontal-force production compared with standard unloaded sprint training (effect size of 0.80 vs 0.20 for controls, unclear between-groups difference) and mechanical effectiveness (ie, more horizontally applied force; effect size of 0.95 vs –0.11, moderate between-groups difference). In addition, 5-m and 20-m sprint performance improvements were moderate and small for the very-heavy sled group and small and trivial for the control group, respectively.

Practical Applications:

This brief report highlights the usefulness of very-heavy sled (80% body mass) training, which may suggest value for practical improvement of mechanical effectiveness and maximal horizontal-force capabilities in soccer players and other team-sport athletes.

Results:

This study may encourage further research to confirm the usefulness of very-heavy sled in this context.

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E. Krieger * Rodrigo G. Dias * Alexandre C. Pereira * 7 2015 10 5 636 641 10.1123/ijspp.2014-0205 Effect of Traditional and Resisted Sprint Training in Highly Trained Female Team Handball Players Live S. Luteberget * Truls Raastad * Olivier Seynnes * Matt Spencer * 7 2015 10 5 642 647

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Sprint Training Beatriz Bachero-Mena * Miguel Sánchez-Moreno * Fernando Pareja-Blanco * Borja Sañudo * 29 05 2020 1 08 2020 15 7 997 1004 10.1123/ijspp.2019-0723 ijspp.2019-0723 Topical Sodium Bicarbonate: No Improvement in Blood Buffering Capacity or Exercise Performance Alannah K.A. McKay

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Brian J. McMorrow, Massimiliano Ditroilo and Brendan Egan

, Kellis S . The effects of resisted sled-pulling sprint training on acceleration and maximum speed performance . J Sports Med Phys Fitness . 2005 ; 45 : 284 – 290 . PubMed ID: 16230978 16230978 14. Harrison AJ , Bourke G . The effect of resisted sprint training on speed and strength performance

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Jorge Carlos-Vivas, Elena Marín-Cascales, Tomás T. Freitas, Jorge Perez-Gomez and Pedro E. Alcaraz

context, assisted and resisted sprint training protocols, which have been largely employed to enhance sprint and acceleration performance, 9 play a key role. 6 These sprint-specific training methods emphasize the force and velocity areas of the F – V curve. Focusing on resisted sprint training