Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 792 items for :

  • "satisfaction" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Harold A. Riemer and Packianathan Chelladurai

The development of the l5-dimension, 56-item Athlete Satisfaction Questionnaire (ASQ) was based on Chelladurai and Riemer’s (1997) classification of facets of athlete satisfaction. Qualitative procedures included item generation, expert judgment, and independent placement of items in relevant facets. Quantitative procedures, item-to-total correlations, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, involving 172 undergraduate students and 614 Canadian university athletes, confirmed the construct validity of the scale. Correlations between the ASQ’s subscales and scales of commitment and negative affectivity provided evidence of criterion-related validity. Reliability estimates (Cronbach’s alpha) ranged from .78 to .95. The 15 facets of ASQ encompassed salient aspects of athletic participation, performance (both individual and team), leadership, the team, the organization, and the athlete.

Restricted access

Erik L. Lachance and Milena M. Parent

, satisfaction, motivation, commitment, and sense of community (e.g.,  Farrell, Johnston, & Twynam, 1998 ; Kerwin, Warner, Walker, & Stevens, 2015 ; MacLean & Hamm, 2007 ). Despite this large body of research, past studies have usually examined constructs individually or in relation with one or two more

Restricted access

Yuhei Inoue, Mikihiro Sato, Kevin Filo, James Du and Daniel C. Funk

engagement in spectator sport events, both behaviorally through live spectating and psychologically through team identification, can contribute to life satisfaction. Life satisfaction is a key component of subjective well-being, referring to a cognitive judgmental assessment of one’s quality of life ( Diener

Restricted access

Sarah Stokowski, Bo Li, Benjamin D. Goss, Shelby Hutchens and Megan Turk

satisfied and motivated ( Wininger & Birkholz, 2013 ). Thus, understanding factors involved with sport management faculty job satisfaction and motivation levels can dually assist with retention efforts of both students and faculty, thereby potentially increasing the stability and quality of sport management

Restricted access

Molly Hayes Sauder and Michael Mudrick

perceptions regarding satisfaction in an internship, as the internship is “a critical element in the professional development of students majoring in sport management” and students therefore should be offered experiences that will “serve as the first step in what could be a lengthy and rewarding career in the

Restricted access

Louise Davis and Sophia Jowett

Grounded in Bowlby’s (1969/1982, 1988) attachment theory, this study aimed to explore (a) the pervasiveness of the three main functions of attachment within the context of the coach-athlete relationship, (b) the associations of athletes’ attachment styles with such important variables as satisfaction with the relationship and satisfaction with the sport, and (c) the process by which athletes’ attachment styles and satisfaction with sport are associated. Data were collected through self-report measures of attachment functions and styles as well as relationship satisfaction and sport satisfaction from 309 student athletes (males = 150, females = 159) whose age ranged from 18 to 28 years (Mage = 19.9, SD = 1.58 years). Athletes’ mean scores indicated that the coach was viewed as an attachment figure fulfilling all three functions of secure base, safe haven, and proximity maintenance. Bivariate correlations indicated that athletes’ avoidant and anxious styles of attachment with the coach were negatively correlated with both relationship satisfaction and sport satisfaction. Mediational regression analysis revealed that athletes’ satisfaction with the coach-athlete relationship may be a process that links athletes’ attachment styles with levels of satisfaction with sport. The findings from this study highlight the potential theoretical and practical utility of attachment theory in studying relationships within the sport context.

Restricted access

Kristen Rogalsky, Alison Doherty and Kyle F. Paradis

The present study tested a theoretical model of the correlates of role ambiguity of major sport event volunteers. The sample consisted of 328 volunteers involved with the 2012 Ontario Summer Games. Participants completed an online questionnaire post-Games that included measures of role ambiguity, role difficulty, training, supervision, effort, performance, role satisfaction, overall satisfaction with the Games, and future volunteer intentions. The findings provide support for a multidimensional model of role ambiguity, consisting of performance outcome ambiguity and means-ends/scope ambiguity in this context. A final model indicated that perceived effective supervision was inversely associated with both dimensions of ambiguity, and they differentially predicted role effort, performance, and role satisfaction. Role performance and role satisfaction predicted overall satisfaction with the Games experience, which was significantly associated with future intentions to volunteer. Implications for sport event volunteer management and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Restricted access

Barbara A. Brown and B. Gail Frankel

This study examines participation in leisure physical activity, leisure satisfaction, and life satisfaction from a life course perspective, using self-report data from a stratified random sample of adults living in a midsized Canadian city. Findings indicate that physical activity is most strongly associated with leisure satisfaction in the younger age groups, whereas no consistent age pattern is observed in the relationship between physical activity and life satisfaction. Regression analyses that are controlled for income, education, and age indicate major gender differences in the impact of participation in leisure physical activity on life satisfaction, with participation being more important for females. Path analysis indicates that leisure satisfaction contributes both directly and indirectly to life satisfaction. The findings provide evidence for age variation in sources of life satisfaction apart from leisure, and for important gender differences in the role of physical activity.

Restricted access

Nicholas S. Washburn, K. Andrew R. Richards and Oleg A. Sinelnikov

, anchored at one end by those that are highly autonomy-supportive and at the other by those that are highly controlling ( Reeve, 2009 ). Autonomy-supportive teachers generally act in ways that support students’ innate desire for psychological need satisfaction (PNS; Reeve, 2009 ). In application, these

Restricted access

Fleur E.C.A. van Rens, Erika Borkoles, Damian Farrow and Remco C.J. Polman

’ psychological wellbeing ( Burgess & Naughton, 2010 ; Ivarsson et al., 2015 ). Yet this information is crucial to understand how the psychological wellbeing of junior elite athletes in dual careers can be facilitated ( Strachan, Côte, & Deakin, 2011 ). Wellbeing and Life Satisfaction in Junior Athletes’ Dual