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Stacy A. Clemes, Beverley M. David, Yi Zhao, Xu Han and Wendy Brown

Background:

In light of evidence linking sedentary behaviors to health outcomes, there have been calls for the measurement of sedentary behavior in surveillance studies. This study examined the convergent validity of 2 self-report measures of sitting time and accelerometer-determined sedentary time (minutes/day of <100 counts/minute).

Methods:

44 adults wore an ActiGraph accelerometer for 7 days, during which they also recorded daily sitting time in a diary, in response to a single-item question. After 7 days, participants completed a new domain-specific questionnaire to assess usual weekday and weekend-day sitting time. Total sitting times recorded from the self-report measures were compared with accelerometer-determined sedentary time.

Results:

Total sitting time calculated from the domain-specific questionnaire did not differ significantly from accelerometer-determined sedentary time on weekdays (mean difference [±SE] = –14 ± 28 mins/day) and weekend days (–4 ± 45 mins/day, both P > .05). Sitting time was significantly underestimated using the single-item specific-day question on weekdays (–173 ± 18 mins/day) and weekend days (–219 ± 23 mins/day, both P < .001).

Conclusions:

When assessed via self-report, the estimation of total sitting time is improved by summing sitting times reported across different domains. The continued improvement of self-report measures of sitting time will be important if we are to further our understanding of the links between sedentary behavior and health.

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Jacob S. Tucker, Scott Martin, Allen W. Jackson, James R. Morrow Jr., Christy A. Greenleaf and Trent A. Petrie

Purpose:

To investigate the relations between sedentary behaviors and health-related physical fitness and physical activity in middle school boys and girls.

Methods:

Students (n = 1515) in grades 6–8 completed the Youth Risk Behavior Survey sedentary behavior questions, the FITNESSGRAM physical fitness items, and FITNESSGRAM physical activity self-report questions.

Results:

When students reported ≤ 2 hours per day of sedentary behaviors, their odds of achieving the FITNESSGRAM Healthy Fitness Zone for aerobic capacity, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition increased. Similarly, the odds of achieving physical activity guidelines for children increased when students reported ≤ 2 hours per day of sedentary behaviors.

Conclusions:

Results illustrate the importance of keeping sedentary behaviors to ≤ 2 hours per day in middle school children, thus increasing the odds that the student will achieve sufficient health-related fitness benefits and be more likely to achieve the national physical activity guidelines.

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Teresa L. Hart, James J. McClain and Catrine Tudor-Locke

Background:

Emerging interest in the health impacts of sedentary behaviors has driven the exploration of objective instrumentation capable of capturing these behaviors. The purpose was to compare (under laboratory conditions) outputs from ActiGraph (AG), Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Physical Activity (IDEEA), and activPAL Professional (AP) against direct observation (DO) in sedentary, standing, and active behaviors; and assess convergent validity of instrument outputs under free-living conditions.

Methods:

Participants (13 males/16 females; 28.9 ± 6.2 years) wore instruments concurrently during laboratory and free-living studies. AG cutpoints of ≤50, <100, and ≤259 counts/minute were used to determine time in sedentary behaviors. Laboratory data were evaluated using mean percent error. Free-living data were analyzed using dependent t tests and RM ANOVA.

Results:

AP precisely measured all identified DO behaviors under laboratory conditions; IDEEA precisely identified sitting and standing. For the free-living study, there was no difference in sedentary time detected by AP and IDEEA but a significant difference was observed in standing time. No difference was apparent between AP and AG259 in sit/lie/stand or ambulatory activity time.

Conclusions:

In a laboratory setting, the utility of all instruments to classify activities into behavioral categories was confirmed. This may enhance research on sedentary behaviors and health-related outcomes.

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Emily Knox, Stuart Biddle, Dale W. Esliger, Joe Piggin and Lauren Sherar

Background:

Mass media campaigns are an important tool for promoting health-related physical activity. The relevance of sedentary behavior to public health has propelled it to feature prominently in health campaigns across the world. This study explored the use of messages regarding sedentary behavior in health campaigns within the context of current debates surrounding the association between sedentary behavior and health, and messaging strategies to promote moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA).

Methods:

A web-based search of major campaigns in the United Kingdom, United States, Canada, and Australia was performed to identify the main campaign from each country. A directed content analysis was then conducted to analyze the inclusion of messages regarding sedentary behavior in health campaigns and to elucidate key themes. Important areas for future research were illustrated.

Results:

Four key themes from the campaigns emerged: clinging to sedentary behavior guidelines, advocating reducing sedentary behavior as a first step on the activity continuum and the importance of light activity, confusing the promotion of MVPA, and the demonization of sedentary behavior.

Conclusions:

Strategies for managing sedentary behavior as an additional complicating factor in health promotion are urgently required. Lessons learned from previous health communication campaigns should stimulate research to inform future messaging strategies.

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Patty Freedson

discussed in the measurement research community for a long time. The reason I think it is so important is because from my perspective as a physical activity epidemiologist, no single study will give us “truth” on the physical activity/sedentary behavior and health relationship; it is the totality of

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Heontae Kim and Minsoo Kang

obesity. 11 Accurate measurement of sedentary behavior is important for (1) determining relationships between sedentary behavior and health outcomes, (2) planning effective interventions to reduce sedentary behavior, and (3) informing the public of health messages related to sedentary behavior. 12 As

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Hongjun Yu and Andiara Schwingel

annual health care cost was AU$38 higher for participants with high sitting time in Australia in 2010. Our findings indicate that the relationship between sedentary behavior and health care expenditure was gender specific. Our results showed higher health care expenditures (i.e., total care and

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Morgan Potter, John C. Spence, Normand Boulé, Jodie A. Stearns and Valerie Carson

on cardiovascular fitness and concluded that there was a positive dose–response trend for vigorous PA at baseline and cardiovascular fitness 2 years later ( 8 ). Similarly, recent reviews on sedentary behavior and health indicators in children and youth ( 7 , 29 ) found only 3 longitudinal studies

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Bronwyn K. Clark, Nyssa T. Hadgraft, Takemi Sugiyama and Elisabeth A. Winkler

_128210.pdf de Rezende , L.F. , Rodrigues Lopes , M. , Rey-Lopez , J.P. , Matsudo , V.K. , & Luiz Odo , C. ( 2014 ). Sedentary behavior and health outcomes: An overview of systematic reviews . PLoS ONE, 9 ( 8 ), e105620 . PubMed ID: 25144686 doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0105620 10

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Marco Giurgiu, Johannes B.J. Bussmann, Holger Hill, Bastian Anedda, Marcel Kronenwett, Elena D. Koch, Ulrich W. Ebner-Priemer and Markus Reichert

.1055566 10.1080/1091367X.2015.1055566 Katzmarzyk , P.T. , Powell , K.E. , Jakicic , J.M. , Troiano , R.P. , Piercy , K. , & Tennant , B. ( 2019 ). Sedentary behavior and health: Update from the 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee . Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 51