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Mary Yoke

Objective:

Physical inactivity, overweight, and obesity are endemic in the United States and in the developed world, leading to increased morbidity and mortality. More information is needed regarding the physical activity beliefs, attitudes, barriers, and perceived self-control among those who are sedentary and weight-challenged. The purpose of this study was to elicit physical activity beliefs about feasibility, pleasure, and movement descriptions from sedentary, middle-aged, overweight women.

Methods:

Open-ended questions were used throughout individual interviews with 23 participants (age: M = 52.0, SD = 7.3; BMI: M = 34.2, SD = 9.79); attitudes and beliefs regarding physical activity and movement descriptions were documented. Participants were divided into those who were completely sedentary (12 women) and those who regularly engaged in physical activity (11 women).

Results:

A content analysis revealed that sedentary women were less active and had more perceived barriers to physical activity than active women. The most frequently cited perceived barriers were injuries, caregiving responsibilities, time, age, dislike of sweating, and depression. Sedentary women were less likely to report physical activity as pleasurable; they were also more likely to cite having an exercise buddy as an optimal activity situation. The most frequently cited pleasurable activities in both groups were yoga, movement to music, stretching, and walking.

Conclusions:

This study provided evidence that perceived barriers to physical activity must be addressed, that low-intensity programs are needed and desired by overweight and sedentary women, and that movement activities must be found that are enjoyable for the target population.

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Marjo B. Rinne, Seppo I. Miilunpalo and Ari O. Heinonen

Background:

There is a lack of knowledge of the motor abilities required in different exercise modes which are needed when counseling sedentary middle-aged people to start a physically active lifestyle.

Methods:

Nominal group technique was used to establish the consensus statement concerning motor abilities and physical fitness in 31 exercise modes.

Results:

Walking, running, jogging, and calisthenics were regarded as the most suitable exercise modes for most people with no specific requirements. The most demanding exercise modes of evaluated exercise modes were roller skating, downhill skiing, and martial arts, requiring all five motor abilities. Four abilities were necessary in skating, jazz dance, and ice hockey. When exercising is target-oriented, endurance is trained evidently in 27 out of 31 and muscle strength in 22 out of 31 exercise modes.

Conclusions:

The consensus statement gives theoretical basis for the components of motor abilities and physical fitness components in different exercise modes. The statement is instructive in order to promote health-enhancing physical activity among sedentary people. This study completes the selection of the exercise modes more detailed than current PA recommendation and guidelines for public health. A variety of exercise modes with one or none motor requirements is available to start. When amount and intensity of exercise is increased the training effects can be found in most components of motor ability and physical fitness.

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Edward McAuley

The relationships between efficacy cognitions and causal attributions for exercise progress, and their impact on affective responses, were examined in a sample of previously sedentary middle-aged individuals 10 weeks into an exercise program. Employing theoretical propositions put forth by Bandura (1986) and Weiner (1985), it was hypothesized that exercise efficacy would influence causal attributions and affective responses to exercise participation. Path analysis demonstrated that greater exercise frequency resulted in more internal, somewhat stable, and personally controllable attributions for perceived exercise progress. More efficacious subjects also attributed their progress to more personally controllable causes. All three causal dimensions were related to positive affect, and efficacy had significant direct and indirect effects on affect. The results are discussed with respect to the need to more closely examine the role affect might play in exercise over time, as opposed to single bouts of exercise. Furthermore, the necessity for studying complex interplays of cognitive determinants of exercise behavior is discussed.

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Douglas R. Seals, Kevin D. Monahan, Christopher Bell, Hirofumi Tanaka and Pamela P. Jones

Tonic vagal modulation of cardiac period (R-R interval) decreases with advancing age, but is greater in middle-aged and older adults who habitually perform aerobic exercise compared with their sedentary peers. Cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity also declines markedly with age in sedentary adults but only 50% as much in regularly exercising adults. In previously sedentary middle-aged and older adults, a 3-month program of moderate aerobic exercise increases cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity by 25%. Tonic (basal) sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity increases with advancing age in both sedentary and habitually exercising adults. Despite this, SNS b-adrenergic support of energy metabolism (resting metabolic rate-RMR) declines with age in sedentary individuals. However, SNS b-adrenergic support of RMR is maintained with age inenduranceexercise-trainedadultsandthereforeismuchgreaterinmiddle-aged and older individuals who exercise regularly compared with their sedentary peers. Thus, regular aerobic (endurance) exercise modulates selective age associated impairments in autonomic nervous system-physiological function.

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.2015-0047 Physical Activity Beliefs in Sedentary, Middle-Aged, Overweight Women Mary Yoke * 4 2017 25 1 65 72 10.1123/wspaj.2016-0007 wspaj Women in Sport and Physical Activity Journal 1063-6161 1938-1581 2017 25 1 10.1123/wspaj.2017.25.issue-1 Article 10.1123/wspaj.2015-0035 10.1123/wspaj.2015

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Ammar Nebigh, Mohamed Elfethi Abed, Rihab Borji, Sonia Sahli, Slaheddine Sellami, Zouhair Tabka and Haithem Rebai

.1749-6632.2010.05675.x 10.1111/j.1749-6632.2010.05675.x 20840247 24. Mohr M , Helge EW , Petersen LF , et al . Effects of soccer vs swim training on bone formation in sedentary middle-aged women . Eur J Appl Physiol . 2015 ; 115 ( 12 ): 2671 – 9 . PubMed doi:10.1007/s00421-015-3231-8 10

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Kent Upham, Brandon J. Auer, Christopher N. Sciamanna, Andrew J. Mowen, Joshua M. Smyth, David E. Conroy, Matthew Silvis, Jennifer L. Kraschnewski, Liza S. Rovniak, Erik Lehman, Kalen Kearcher, Maggie Vizzini and Louis Cesarone

specifically to maximize enjoyment could feasibly be used to enhance PA in sedentary middle-aged adults as our 2 conclusions showed that individuals taking part in PlayFit both enjoyed themselves and were exercising comparably to traditional exercise programs. Limitations Although this study has a number of

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Sarah J. Wherry, Cheryl Der Ananian and Pamela D. Swan

, middle-aged individuals is extremely important given the rise in lifestyle-related chronic diseases. Exergaming’s success in clinical populations suggests that it could be a convenient and inexpensive option for non-hospital-based programs 10 ; however, there is no research to indicate if exergaming is

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Danielle Nesbitt, Sergio Molina, Ryan Sacko, Leah E. Robinson, Ali Brian and David Stodden

.2165/00007256-200939070-00004 Green , L.N. , & Williams , K. ( 1992 ). Differences in developmental movement patterns used by active versus sedentary middle-aged adults coming from a supine position to erect stance . Physical Therapy , 72 ( 8 ), 560 – 568 . PubMed ID: 1635940 doi:10.1093/ptj/72.8.560 10.1093/ptj/72

Open access

Sebastien Pollet, James Denison-Day, Katherine Bradbury, Rosie Essery, Elisabeth Grey, Max Western, Fiona Mowbray, Kirsten A. Smith, Joanna Slodkowska-Barabasz, Nanette Mutrie, Paul Little and Lucy Yardley

-018-0678-0 Lachman , M.E. , Lipsitz , L. , Lubben , J. , Castaneda-Sceppa , C. , & Jette , A.M. ( 2018 ). When adults don’t exercise: Behavioral strategies to increase physical activity in sedentary middle-aged and older adults . Innovation in Aging, 2 ( 1 ), 1 – 12 . doi: 10.1093/geroni/igy007 Lally