Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 203 items for :

  • "self-worth" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Irina Burchard Erdvik, Tommy Haugen, Andreas Ivarsson, and Reidar Säfvenbom

Global self-worth (GSW) is described as an overall evaluation of one’s worth or value as a person ( Harter, 2006 ) and a general sense of happiness with the way one is as a human being ( Harter, 2012 ). Besides commonly being referred to as GSW ( Harter, 2006 ), this overall sense of personal

Restricted access

Elizabeth Rose and Dawne Larkin

According to Harter (1985a), global self-worth (GSW) can be predicted from the relationship between perceptions of competence and importance ratings. In this study, we employed Harter’s (1985b) Importance Rating Scale (IRS) and Self-Perception Profile for Children (SPPC) to examine importance ratings, discrepancy scores, and domain-specific perceptions of competence as predictors of GSW. Children (N = 130, 62 boys and 68 girls) aged 8-12 years were categorized into high (HMC; n = 62) and low motor coordination (LMC; n = 68) groups according to their scores on a motor proficiency battery (McCarron, 1982). Regression analyses using domain-specific perceptions of competence, importance, and discrepancy scores confirmed that self-perception ratings were the best predictors of GSW. For both groups, perceptions of physical appearance, social acceptance, and behavioral conduct contributed significantly to prediction of GSW. By contrast, perceived athletic competence increased prediction of GSW for the HMC group but not the LMC group.

Restricted access

Lindley McDavid, Meghan H. McDonough, Bonnie T. Blankenship, and James M. LeBreton

in specific contexts and their overall self-worth ( Harter, 1999 ). Couched in basic psychological needs theory, social relationships between adults and youth, and psychological needs satisfaction in youth are shown to predict indicators of well-being such as self-worth and hope. Self-worth is a

Restricted access

Emily L. Mailey, Jennifer Huberty, and Brandon C. Irwin

Background:

The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of a web-based intervention to promote physical activity and self-worth among working mothers.

Methods:

Participants (N = 69) were randomly assigned to receive a standard web-based intervention or an enhanced intervention that included group dynamics strategies to promote engagement. The 8-week intervention was guided by self-determination theory. Each week, participants were instructed to complete 3 tasks: listen to a podcast related to well-being, complete a workbook assignment, and communicate with other participants on a discussion board. Participants in the enhanced condition received an additional weekly task to enhance group cohesion. Data were collected at baseline, week 8, and week 16.

Results:

Physical activity (P < .001, η2 = 0.35) and self-worth (P < .001, η2 = 0.39) increased significantly in both groups following the intervention, and introjected (P < .001, η2 = 0.30) and external motivation (P = .04, η2 = 0.10) decreased. Website use declined across the 8-week intervention in both groups (P < .001, η2 = 0.48); however, discussion board use was higher in the enhanced condition (P = .04, η2 = 0.21).

Conclusions:

These findings suggest web-based interventions can improve physical activity and self-worth among working mothers. Group dynamics strategies only minimally enhanced user engagement, and future studies are needed to optimize web-based intervention designs.

Restricted access

Stephanie J. Hanrahan

People who live in the villas (i.e., slums) of Buenos Aires are confronted with poverty, poor and dangerous living conditions, and discrimination. Ten weeks were spent in the villas delivering a program designed to enhance life satisfaction and self-worth through games and the development of mental skills. The purpose of this paper is not to report on the content or the effectiveness of the program, but rather to explore the variables within Argentina and the villas as well as my own cultural biases that may have influenced the delivery of a psychological intervention program. Argentine factors include a high prevalence of psychologists and a psychoanalytic focus. Characteristics of the villas include environmental factors (e.g., transportation issues, sanitation), logistical issues (e.g., venues, access to writing implements), and psychological matters (e.g., hopelessness, different perceptions of confidence). Practitioner concerns included limited familiarity with life in the villas and having values that might be different from those of the participants. The discussion includes recommendations for others who are considering working in similar cultural and contextual situations.

Restricted access

Thomas D. Raedeke, Victoria Blom, and Göran Kenttä

beliefs and attitudes. Although perfectionistic concerns and strivings are used to define and describe perfectionism, Hall et al. noted that the pattern of dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes associated with perfectionism is also underpinned by a belief that self-worth and acceptance are inextricably tied

Restricted access

Marit Eriksson, Tobias Nordqvist, and Finn Rasmussen

Background:

The aims of this study were to investigate parent–child physical activity (PA) associations and whether children’s self-esteem or athletic competence mediates such associations.

Methods:

The study population comprised 1124 12-year-old children and their parents. Parents’ PA was assessed using the Baecke questionnaire and a question about sport participation. Children’s PA was assessed by questions about participation in sport and vigorous activities. The children’s self-esteem and athletic competence were assessed by Harter’s Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents.

Results:

Parents’ PA was strongly associated with their children’s PA. With 2 active parents, the odds ratio for their children to participate in sport was 3.9 (95% CI = 2.2–6.9, girls) and 8.8 (95% CI = 4.3–18.0, boys) compared with having inactive parents. Athletic competence partly mediated these associations.

Conclusions:

The family is an important target for interventions to increase PA among children, and it might be important to consider ways to reinforce children’s athletic competence.

Restricted access

Susan Aguiñaga, Diane K. Ehlers, Elizabeth A. Salerno, Jason Fanning, Robert W. Motl, and Edward McAuley

physical self-worth (PSW) may influence negative affect (eg, depression, anxiety). 9 – 11 The PSW domain is informed by subdomains (eg, physical condition, body attractiveness, physical strength). 12 Thus, by participating in a physical activity intervention, older adults may improve perceptions of their

Restricted access

Denise M. Hill, Matthew Cheesbrough, Paul Gorczynski, and Nic Matthews

inferred by Hill et al. ( 2010a ) that it was due to their highly self-critical response to the choking event. The authors went on to suggest that choking may also diminish athletes’ self-esteem, self-worth, and well-being, as one of their participants recalled, “[After choking] I hate golf. . . . I hate