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Manuel Terraza-Rebollo and Ernest Baiget

out that serve velocity is a good performance tennis predictor in young tennis players. 4 The tennis serve is a complex movement that requires a proper technique, power, strength, speed, flexibility, muscular endurance, and muscular balance. 2 A synchronized kinetic chain is necessary in order to

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Charles Goulet and Isabelle Rogowski

stability, which may help result in improved serve velocity. 7 Recreational tennis players have received limited attention in the literature, mainly because their training time is considered insufficient to generate great adaptations. However, many years of tennis playing could also lead to shoulder

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Michael Behringer, Sebastian Neuerburg, Maria Matthews and Joachim Mester

The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the transferability of 2 different resistance training protocols on service velocity and its precision consistency in junior tennis players. Thirty-six male athletes (15.03 ± 1.64 years) were randomly assigned to a machine-based resistance-training group (RG, n = 12), a plyometric training group (PG, n = 12), and a control group (CG, n = 12). For a period of 8 weeks, both intervention groups resistance trained 2 days per week in addition to their regular tennis training, whereas the CG had no extra training. Mean service velocity over 20 maximum-velocity serves increased significantly more in PG (3.78%; p < .05) when compared with CG, whereas no such changes could be found in the RG (1.18%; p > .05). Service precision did not change from pre- to posttest in all three groups (p > .05). Only the plyometric training program tested, improved mean service velocity over 20 maximum-velocity serves in junior tennis players but did not affect service precision.

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Julien Le Gal, Mickael Begon, Benoit Gillet and Isabelle Rogowski

and pectoralis minor on the glenohumeral range of motion in advanced adolescent tennis players. Secondary objectives were to assess its effect on the self-perception of shoulder instability and on serve velocity and accuracy. It was hypothesized that self-myofascial release helps to restore the

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Daniel J. Hornery, Damian Farrow, Iñigo Mujika and Warren B. Young

Purpose:

To determine the effects of prolonged simulated tennis on performance and the ergogenic potential of caffeine, carbohydrates, and cooling.

Methods:

Twelve highly trained male tennis players (age 18.3 ± 3.0 y, height 178.8 ± 8.5 cm, body mass 73.95 ± 12.30 kg, mean ± SD) performed 4 simulated matches (2 h 40 min) against a ball machine on an indoor hard court. The counterbalanced experimental trials involved caffeine supplementation (3 mg/kg), carbohydrate supplementation (6% solution), precooling and intermittent cooling, and placebo control. Physiological markers (core temperature, heart rate, blood lactate, and blood glucose), subjective responses (ratings of perceived exertion and thermal sensation), stroke velocity and accuracy, serve kinematics, and tennis-specific perceptual skill quantified the efficacy of interventions.

Results:

Significant effects of time (P < .01) reflected increased physiological demand, reduced serve velocity and ground-stroke velocity and accuracy, and a slowing of the serve racket-arm acceleration phase. Caffeine increased serve velocity (165 ± 15 km/h) in the final set of the match (P = .014) compared with placebo (159 ± 15 km/h, P = .008) and carbohydrate (158 ± 13 km/h, P = .001) conditions. Carbohydrate and cooling conditions afforded physiological advantage (increased blood glucose, P < .01, and reduced preexercise thermal sensation, P < .01) but did not affect performance relative to the placebo condition.

Conclusions:

Prolonged simulated tennis induced significant decrements in tennis skills. Caffeine supplementation partly attenuated the effects of fatigue and increased serve velocity. In contrast, carbohydrate and cooling strategies had little ergogenic effect on tennis performance.

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Jaime Fernandez-Fernandez, Eduardo Sáez De Villarreal, David Sanz-Rivas and Manuel Moya

Objectives:

The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of an 8-week (conducted biweekly for a total of 16 sessions) plyometric training program (PT) (e.g., upper- and lower-body exercises) combined with regular tennis training on physical qualities in young tennis players.

Design:

Sixty tennis players between the ages of 12 and 13 years (age 12.5 ± 0.3 years, weight 44.2 ± 7.0 kg, height 156.6 ± 7.1 cm) were allocated to either the control group (standard in-season regimen) (CG; n = 30) or the experimental group, which received an additional PT (TG; n = 30) for 30–60 min as a substitute for some tennis training within the usual 90-min practice.

Methods:

Pre- and posttests included: anthropometric measures; vertical countermovement jump (CMJ); standing long jump (SLJ); 20 m sprint time (with 5 and 10 m splits); a modified 505 agility test; overhead medicine ball throw; and serve velocity test.

Results:

After the training intervention, the TG showed significant (p < .01) improvements in all the parameters analyzed, with percentages of change and effect sizes ranging from 3.1% to 10.1% and 0.4 (small) to 1.3 (moderate), respectively. No significant changes were observed in the CG after the training intervention.

Conclusions:

PT was shown as an important stimulus for enhancing explosive actions in young tennis players.

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Danielle T. Gescheit, Stuart J. Cormack, Machar Reid and Rob Duffield

Purpose:

To determine how consecutive days of prolonged tennis match play affect performance, physiological, and perceptual responses.

Methods:

Seven well-trained male tennis players completed 4-h tennis matches on 4 consecutive days. Pre- and postmatch measures involved tennis-specific (serve speed and accuracy), physical (20-m sprint, countermovement jump [CMJ], shoulder-rotation maximal voluntary contraction, isometric midthigh pull), perceptual (Training Distress Scale, soreness), and physiological (creatine kinase [CK]) responses. Activity profile was assessed by heart rate, 3D load (accumulated accelerations measured by triaxial accelerometers), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Statistical analysis compared within- and between-days values. Changes (± 90% confidence interval [CI]) ≥75% likely to exceed the smallest important effect size (0.2) were considered practically important.

Results:

3D load reduced on days 2 to 4 (mean effect size ± 90% CI –1.46 ± 0.40) and effective playing time reduced on days 3 to 4 (–0.37 ± 0.51) compared with day 1. RPE did not differ and total points played only declined on day 3 (–0.38 ± 1.02). Postmatch 20-m sprint (0.79 ± 0.77) and prematch CMJ (–0.43 ± 0.27) performance declined on days 2 to 4 compared with prematch day 1. Although serve velocity was maintained, compromised postmatch serve accuracy was evident compared with prematch day 1 (0.52 ± 0.58). CK increased each day, as did ratings of muscle soreness and fatigue.

Conclusions:

Players reduced external physical loads, through declines in movement, over 4 consecutive days of prolonged competitive tennis. This may be affected by tactical changes and pacing strategies. Alongside this, impairments in sprinting and jumping ability, perceptual and biochemical markers of muscle damage, and reduced mood states may be a function of neuromuscular and perceptual fatigue.

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.1123/pes.25.3.360 Effects of Two Different Resistance-Training Programs on Mean Tennis-Serve Velocity in Adolescents Michael Behringer * Sebastian Neuerburg * Maria Matthews * Joachim Mester * 8 2013 25 3 370 384 10.1123/pes.25.3.370 Peak-Power Estimation Equations in 12- to 16-Year-Old Children

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M. Blain * 1 03 2020 15 3 330 339 10.1123/ijspp.2019-0031 ijspp.2019-0031 Effects of Postactivation Potentiation on Tennis Serve Velocity and Accuracy Manuel Terraza-Rebollo * Ernest Baiget * 1 03 2020 15 3 340 345 10.1123/ijspp.2019-0240 ijspp.2019-0240 Can Hyperoxic Preconditioning in

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Darren Steeves, Leo J. Thornley, Joshua A. Goreham, Matthew J. Jordan, Scott C. Landry and Jonathon R. Fowles

tennis serve velocity and select performance measures . J Strength Cond Res . 2018 . PubMed ID: 29324575 doi:10.1519/JSC.0000000000002440 10.1519/JSC.0000000000002440 29324575 14. Thomas C , Comfort P , Jones PA , Dos’Santos T . A comparison of isometric midth-pull strength, vertical jump