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Elizabeth A. Taylor, Gareth J. Jones, Kristy McCray, and Robin Hardin

dynamics are also evident in the culture of sport organizations ( Harkins & Dixon, 2010 ). Due to the masculine culture surrounding sport and the nature in which boys and men are taught to act in sport-related contexts (e.g., aggressive, dominant), issues of sexual harassment and sexual assault are

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Rachel Allison and Chris Knoester

, particularly in men’s sport ( Lee & Cunningham, 2016 ). Greater recognition of women and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) athletes and fans, declining sexism and sexual stigma, and the rising profile of U.S. women’s sports are especially contributing to change, although it is often

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Marja Kokkonen

Sexual harassment occurs in all sports in the form of intentional or unintentional sexualized verbal, nonverbal or physical behavior ( Marks, Mountjoy, & Marcus, 2012 ) that is unwanted, threatening, troublesome, insulting or offensive ( Fasting, 2015 ). Verbal sexual harassment includes, for

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Kendahl Shortway, Marina Oganesova, and Andrew Vincent

the athletic context. One such issue is sexual assault. Considering the high prevalence rates on college campuses (see RAINN, 2018 ), it is likely that practitioners in this setting will work with student-athletes directly affected by sexual assault. The present article provides an overview of the

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Robin Hardin, Elizabeth A. Taylor, and Emily Sleadd

-Miller & Flores, 2011 ; Taylor & Hardin, 2016 ; Taylor et al., 2017 ; Walker & Bopp, 2011 ). One of these challenges is sexual harassment in the workplace. The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of sexual harassment of female students in the sport management internship setting and their

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Michael A. Odio, Patty Raube Keller, and Dana Drew Shaw

physical assault, they do not qualify for federal employee protections such as those provided by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 against sexual harassment in the workplace ( Hickman & Thompson, 2013 ; Schoepfer & Dodds, 2010 ). In many cases, students’ degree progress and professional reputation

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Emily Kroshus

Preventing sexual assault on college campuses is an important priority in the United States ( https://www.congress.gov/bill/112th-congress/house-bill/2016 ). One subset of college students that have received particular attention related to sexual assault prevention are athletes. In 2017, the

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Emma Kavanagh, Chelsea Litchfield, and Jaquelyn Osborne

represent women in ways that they wish to be perceived or presented. This shows the progressive nature of these spaces. That said, at the same time, persistent and traditional themes relating to the infantilizaton and sexualization of women in media spaces remain ever present ( Litchfield, Kavanagh, Osborne

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T. Christopher Greenwell, Jason M. Simmons, Meg Hancock, Megan Shreffler, and Dustin Thorn

were to pay to see women fight, they should at least be topless ( Holland, 2014 ). Brown’s comment not only sexualizes female fighters but also suggests that many people still do not see MMA as an acceptable activity for women. With the inclusion of female athletes in combat sport, questions of how to

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Danielle C. DeLisio, E. Earlynn Lauer, Terilyn C. Shigeno, Leslee A. Fisher, and Rebecca A. Zakrajsek

number. The quotes above provide only a few examples of our experiences as applied practitioners (certified mental performance consultants; CMPCs) related to sexual harassment while consulting. Each of the quotes represents a range of ethical dilemmas, and we have come to believe that, in the field of