Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 607 items for :

Clear All
Open access

Jairo H. Migueles, Alex V. Rowlands, Florian Huber, Séverine Sabia and Vincent T. van Hees

Human physical activity and sleep are popular areas of research because of their important role in health outcomes ( He, Zhang, Li, Dai, & Shi, 2017 ; Lee et al., 2012 ). Physical activity and sleep have traditionally been quantified with diaries and questionnaires, but wearable sensors have

Restricted access

Emily Kaier, Danielle Zanotti, Joanne L. Davis, Kathleen Strunk and Lisa DeMarni Cromer

Sleep concerns are prevalent among student-athletes and can result in impaired athletic and academic performance. The current study investigated the feasibility and effectiveness of a brief sleep workshop for student-athletes. Athletes (N = 152) completed baseline and follow-up questionnaires (n = 104) after the intervention. Greater than half of the athletes (51%) who attended the workshops and followup reported at least one change in sleep behaviors. Results revealed a significant decrease in sleepiness from baseline to follow-up and an improvement in daytime functioning. Although athletes reported an increase in problematic sleep hygiene behaviors, they recorded significant increases in sleep knowledge from baseline to follow-up, which was maintained at the second follow-up. These longitudinal data provide evidence that a brief psychoeducation sleep workshop for student-athletes is promising for improving sleep knowledge and daily functioning.

Restricted access

Natashia Swalve, Brianna Harfmann, John Mitrzyk and Alexander H. K. Montoye

The amount and quality of sleep plays an integral role in overall health ( Irwin, 2015 ). More than 10% of the United States population suffers from a clinically significant sleep disorder, such as insomnia and sleep apnea ( Ram, Seirawan, Kumar, & Clark, 2010 ), which has been estimated to cost up

Restricted access

Benita J. Lalor, Shona L. Halson, Jacqueline Tran, Justin G. Kemp and Stuart J. Cormack

Numerous strategies are commonly implemented in an attempt to maximize the rate of recovery, including hydrotherapy, compression garments, and individualized nutrition programs. Often underutilized in high-performance environments, given its restorative role, sleep has the potential to assist with

Open access

Sigridur L. Gudmundsdottir

According to the National Sleep Foundation, teenagers are recommended to sleep for 8 to 10 hours each night ( 13 ). Inadequate sleep duration is believed to have adverse effects on general health and well-being in young people ( 31 ), and a negative effect on athletic performance and recovery ( 10

Restricted access

Anna Pulakka, Eric J. Shiroma, Tamara B. Harris, Jaana Pentti, Jussi Vahtera and Sari Stenholm

comfort for 24-hour wear, enabling measurement of sleep duration and quality, and better detection of light activity related to daily tasks, which may be primarily upper body movements ( Quante et al., 2015 ; Schrack et al., 2016 ; Troiano et al., 2014 ). However, wearing the device 24 hours/day creates

Restricted access

Sarah Kölling, Rob Duffield, Daniel Erlacher, Ranel Venter and Shona L. Halson

Sleep is increasingly gaining attention among sport scientists and practitioners as an important element to optimize sport performance and recovery. In fact, the critical importance of sleep’s restorative effects in daily life makes it an integral part of the recovery processes for athletes. 1 For

Restricted access

Andressa Silva, Fernanda V. Narciso, Igor Soalheiro, Fernanda Viegas, Luísa S.N. Freitas, Adriano Lima, Bruno A. Leite, Haroldo C. Aleixo, Rob Duffield and Marco T. de Mello

Sleep is a basic requirement for human health and, given its restorative qualities, is recognized as an important component of an athlete’s recovery. 1 Although both the quantity and the quality of sleep are important, sleep quality remains an area lacking research focus when evaluating recovery

Restricted access

Haresh T. Suppiah, Chee Yong Low, Gabriel Choong and Michael Chia

Sleep insufficiency among adolescents is a global phenomenon 1 influenced by multiple biologically governed factors, 2 alongside other external influences. 3 In addition, evidence shows a declining trend in worldwide sleep durations among adolescents over the last century, 4 with Asian

Restricted access

Laura E. Juliff, Jeremiah J. Peiffer and Shona L. Halson

Despite the acknowledged importance of sleep for performance and recovery, 1 athletes commonly experience sleep loss following late competitions. 2 – 4 Specifically, team-sport athletes such as male footballers 4 and Australian rules footballers 5 , 6 have reported reduced sleep quantities of