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Assuman Nuhu and Matthew Kutz

Epidemiological research on soccer injuries during African soccer competition is sparse. This study was conducted among 12 teams in the Council of East and Central Africa Football Association (CECAFA) challenge cup tournament. Fifty-seven injuries were reported (2.7 injuries per match), or 82.25 injuries per 1,000 match hours. The ankle was most often injured (23%). The majority (81%) of injuries occurred as a result of traumatic contact, with the most injuries occurring in the last 30 min of the match. A majority (84%) of athletes who sustained injuries continued to play. African medical personnel should be trained to handle the unique constraints and variety of injuries sustained during soccer competition.

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Matthew L. Jones, Gary E. McIlvain, Matthew S. Schaeffer, Samuel C. Hoxie, and Charles E. Giangarra

Edited by Joseph J. Piccininni

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Pedro Gómez-Carmona, Ismael Fernández-Cuevas, Manuel Sillero-Quintana, Javier Arnaiz-Lastras, and Archit Navandar

Context: Infrared thermography has been used to detect skeletal muscle overload and fatigue in athletes, but its use in injury prevention in professional soccer has not been studied to date. Objectives: To establish a novel injury prevention program based on infrared thermography and to determine its influence on the injury incidence in professional soccer players in the preseason. Design: A cross-sectional, prospective study design was used to compare a conventional injury prevention program (CPP) applied over the first preseason and an infrared thermography injury prevention program (IRTPP) carried out in the following preseason. Setting: Soccer training ground. Participants: Twenty-four players belonging to a first division soccer team from Spain. Main Outcome Measures: Injury incidences of each player were recorded according to the Orchard Sports Injury Classification System (version 10.0) convention to determine the injury classification, location, and type. Results: The incidence of injuries decreased from 15 injuries in the CPP preseason (0.63 [0.77] injuries per player) to 6 injuries in the second preseason when the IRTPP was applied (0.25 [0.53] injuries per player). The days of absence due to injuries also decreased from the CPP preseason (156 d, 10.4 [11.0] d per injury) to the IRTPP preseason (14 d, 2.3 [2.8] d per injury). The injury severity also decreased from the first preseason to the second preseason, and fewer musculoskeletal injuries in the thigh, hip, and groin were reported. Conclusions: The implementation of an IRTPP can reduce the presence of injuries by identifying players potentially at risk and as a result, reducing the injury severity and days lost as a consequence.

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Andressa Silva, Fernanda V. Narciso, Igor Soalheiro, Fernanda Viegas, Luísa S.N. Freitas, Adriano Lima, Bruno A. Leite, Haroldo C. Aleixo, Rob Duffield, and Marco T. de Mello

Purpose: To investigate the relationship between sleep quality and quantity and injuries in elite soccer players and to compare sleep–wake variables and injury characteristics. Methods: The current investigation was a prospective cohort study of 23 elite male soccer players competing for 2 teams over 6 mo in the highest-level Brazilian competition. The players’ sleep behavior was monitored for 10 d in the preseason using self-reporting sleep diaries and wrist activity monitors to determine sleep duration and quality. Furthermore, injuries were recorded by the respective club’s medical teams into a specific database. Details of injuries recorded included the type, location, and severity of each injury. The results were expressed as descriptive statistics, and the significance level was set at 5%. The Mann–Whitney U test was performed to compare the sleep variables between groups. Spearman correlation coefficient and linear-regression analysis were used. Results: The results indicated a moderate negative correlation between sleep efficiency and particular injury characteristics, including absence time, injury severity, and amount of injuries. The linear-regression analysis indicated that 44% of the total variance in the number of injuries can be explained by sleep efficiency, 24% of the total variance in the absence time after injury (days) can be explained by sleep efficiency, and 47% of the total variance in the injury severity can be explained by sleep efficiency. Conclusions: Soccer players who exhibit lower sleep quality or nonrestorative sleep show associations with increased number and severity of musculoskeletal injuries.

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Steven P. Broglio and Kevin M. Guskiewicz

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Kevin M. Cross, Kelly K. Gurka, Susan Saliba, Mark Conaway, and Jay Hertel

changes in sprinting while fatigued help to explain the increased occurrence of thigh strains during the later stages of competition and practice. Reports of soccer injuries, including lower-extremity muscle strains, have identified relatively even distribution among field players. 6 , 8 , 17 , 18 , 25

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Derek G. Shendell, Tracy A. Listwan, Lauren Gonzalez, and Joseph Panchella

: 17710175 17710175 20. Dick R , Putukian M , Agel J , Evans TA , Marshall SW . Descriptive epidemiology of collegiate women’s soccer injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988–1989 through 2002–2003 . J Athl Train . 2007 ; 42 ( 2 ): 278 – 285

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Shauna Ericksen, Geoff Dover, and Richard DeMont

after the completion of the program. The outcomes observed supports the benefits of psychological skills training in preventing soccer injuries. There was a positive effect on individual and team performance. There is a need for a minimum number of sessions when compared with other studies that did not

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Marco Beato, Sergio Maroto-Izquierdo, Anthony N. Turner, and Chris Bishop

+ program has previously been reported to induce a substantial injury-preventing effect by reducing soccer injuries by 39% compared with control protocols. 17 This program has been reported to be effective in reducing, for instance, groin injuries (which represent 4%–19% of all time-loss injuries), but

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John J. Smith and Daniel J. Baer

SW . Descriptive epidemiology of collegiate men’s soccer injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988-1989 through 2002–2003 . J Athl Train . 2007 ; 42 ( 2 ): 270 – 277 . PubMed ID: 17710176 17710176 9. Woods C , Hawkins RD , Maltby S , Hulse M