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Jihyun Lee, Seung Ho Chang, and Jerred Jolin

, Curtin, and Bandini ( 2015 ) showed that parents of children with ASD reported social skills (77%), few friends (45%), and being excluded by other children (23%) as barriers to their children’s participation in physical activities significantly more than parents of typically developing children. Thus

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Andrew M. Colombo-Dougovito and Jihyun Lee

potential for modified use in a physical activity (PA) space ( Colombo-Dougovito, 2015 ), have not been designed or validated for these PA settings. Furthermore, multiple definitions of social skills are used interchangeably to describe an individual’s overall social functioning ( Cordier et al., 2015

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Amaury Samalot-Rivera and David L. Porretta

The purpose of this study was to determine adapted physical educators’ perceptions and practices about teaching social skills to students with disabilities. A questionnaire based on Bandura’s social learning theory concept of modeling was developed and mailed to an entire frame of 426 adapted physical education teachers in the state of Ohio. Face and content validity as well as test/retest reliability (0.89) were established. Of those that were surveyed, 53% (225 teachers; 148 females and 77 males) responded. Results indicate that 93% (209) believe it is important to explicitly teach social skills in PE; however, 60% (135) expressed not feeling properly prepared to teach them. Teachers with more than 20 years of teaching experience were more likely to actually teach social skills. When compared with other teachers with less years teaching, however, they identified a greater need for training in the teaching of social skills. Results are discussed relative to teacher preparation and practices as well as social skills taught for general education and community integration.

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Megan MacDonald, Catherine Lord, and Dale A. Ulrich

Motor skill deficits are present and persist in school-aged children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD; Staples & Reid, 2010). Yet the focus of intervention is on core impairments, which are part of the diagnostic criteria for ASD, deficits in social communication skills. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the functional motor skills, of 6- to 15-year-old children with high-functioning ASD, predict success in standardized social communicative skills. It is hypothesized that children with better motor skills will have better social communicative skills. A total of 35 children with ASD between the ages of 6–15 years participated in this study. The univariate GLM (general linear model) tested the relationship of motor skills on social communicative skills holding constant age, IQ, ethnicity, gender, and clinical ASD diagnosis. Object-control motor skills significantly predicted calibrated ASD severity (p < .05). Children with weaker motor skills have greater social communicative skill deficits. How this relationship exists behaviorally, needs to be explored further.

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Homan Lee, Janice Causgrove Dunn, and Nicholas L. Holt

The purpose of this study was to explore youth sport experiences of individuals with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Participants were 6 males (mean age = 22.7 yr) with ADHD who had played 3 or more seasons in team sports during adolescence. Following interpretive phenomenological analysis methodology, each participant completed 2 semistructured interviews. Findings showed that symptoms of ADHD hampered participants’ experiences and led to negative interpersonal and performance-related consequences. On the other hand, participants reported social and stress/energy-release benefits arising from their experiences in sport. Their experiences were therefore complex, and some findings relating to social interactions appeared contradictory (e.g., negative interpersonal experiences vs. social benefits). Supportive coaches, understanding teammates, and personal coping strategies were key factors that enabled participants to realize benefits and, to some degree, mitigate negative consequences associated with their participation in sport.

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Leanne K. Elliott, Jonathan A. Weiss, and Meghann Lloyd

encompass the most common secondary effects studied to date ( Bremer, Crozier, & Lloyd, 2016 ). Changes in adaptive behaviors, stereotypic behaviors, attention, and social skills encompass the main behavioral changes that have been investigated following motor-based interventions, including martial arts

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Kim Nguyen, Robert J. Coplan, Kristen A. Archbell, and Linda Rose-Krasnor

athletes in the team sport contexts. Drawing upon previous research and theory pertaining to the benefits of sports and the particular characteristics of shy children, we speculated that coaches would highlight social skills/peer relationships and the self-system as domains where benefits would be most

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Janet Hauck and Isabella Felzer-Kim

Improving Certain Developmental Domains in Children With ASD “Activities of daily living” was the category with the lowest mean score (3.60 [2.18]), indicating that students highly valued activities of daily living for children with ASD. “Social skills” (3.60 [2.18]) and “self-esteem” (3.89 [2.19]) were

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Kelly P. Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Viviane Grassmann, Krystn Orr, Amy C. McPherson, Guy E. Faulkner, and F. Virginia Wright

, after which two meetings and a series of online discussions were held to discuss the results. Based on these group discussions, the main outcomes of the included studies were categorized into four key areas of associated impact—social skills and relationships, physical skill development, psychological

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Lorcan D. Cronin and Justine B. Allen

The present study explored the relationships between the coaching climate, youth developmental experiences (personal and social skills, cognitive skills, goal setting, and initiative) and psychological well-being (self-esteem, positive affect, and satisfaction with life). In total, 202 youth sport participants (Mage = 13.4, SD = 1.8) completed a survey assessing the main study variables. Findings were consistent with Benson and Saito’s (2001) framework for youth development. In all analyses, the coaching climate was related to personal and social skills, cognitive skills, goal setting, and initiative. Mediational analysis also revealed that the development of personal and social skills mediated the relationships between the coaching climate and all three indices of psychological well-being (self-esteem, positive affect, and satisfaction with life). Interpretation of the results suggests that coaches should display autonomy-supportive coaching behaviors because they are related to the developmental experiences and psychological well-being of youth sport participants.