Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 42 items for :

  • "socioeconomic position" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Katherine L. Downing, Trina Hinkley and Kylie D. Hesketh

Background:

There is little current understanding of the influences on sedentary behavior and screen time in preschool children. This study investigated socioeconomic position (SEP) and parental rules as potential correlates of preschool children’s sedentary behavior and screen time.

Methods:

Data from the Healthy Active Preschool Years (HAPPY) Study were used. Participating parents reported their child’s usual weekly screen time and their rules to regulate their child’s screen time. Children wore accelerometers for 8 days to objectively measure sedentary time.

Results:

Children whose parents limited television viewing spent significantly less time in that behavior and in total screen time; however, overall sedentary behavior was unaffected. An association between parents limiting computer/electronic game use and time spent on the computer was found for girls only. SEP was inversely associated with girls’, but not boys’, total screen time and television viewing.

Conclusions:

As parental rules were generally associated with lower levels of screen time, intervention strategies could potentially encourage parents to set limits on, and switch off, screen devices. Intervention strategies should target preschool children across all SEP areas, as there was no difference by SEP in overall sedentary behavior or screen time for boys.

Restricted access

Kylie Ball, Verity J. Cleland, Anna F. Timperio, Jo Salmon and David A. Crawford

Background:

This study aimed to examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between socioeconomic position (SEP) and physical activity and sedentary behaviors among children and adolescents.

Methods:

Maternal education was reported by parents of 184 children 5 to 6 years old and 358 children 10 to 12 years old in 2001. In 2001 and 2004, physical activity was assessed by accelerometry. Older children self-reported and parents of younger children proxy-reported physical activity and TV-viewing behaviors. Linear regression was used to predict physical activity and sedentary behaviors, and changes in these behaviors, from maternal education.

Results:

Among all children, accelerometer-determined and self- or parent-reported moderate and vigorous physical activity declined over 3 years. Girls of higher SEP demonstrated greater decreases in TV-viewing behaviors than those of low SEP. In general, no prospective associations were evident between SEP and objectively assessed physical activity. A small number of prospective associations were noted between SEP and self-reported physical activity, but these were generally weak and inconsistent in direction.

Conclusions:

This study did not find strong evidence that maternal education was cross-sectionally or longitudinally predictive of children’s physical activity or sedentary behaviors. Given the well-documented inverse relationship of SEP with physical activity levels in adult samples, the findings suggest that such disparities might emerge after adolescence.

Restricted access

Toben F. Nelson, Richard F. MacLehose, Cynthia Davey, Peter Rode and Marilyn S. Nanney

health behavior targets is to achieve health equity, eliminate disparities [eg, by gender, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic position (SEP), place of residence], and improve the health of all groups. Significant disparities in PA among youth exist. 17 , 18 For example, boys are more likely than girls to be

Restricted access

Laura Kestilä, Tomi Mäki-Opas, Anton E Kunst, Katja Borodulin, Ossi Rahkonen and Ritva Prättälä

Background:

Limited knowledge exists on how childhood social, health-related and economic circumstances predict adult physical inactivity. Our aim was a) to examine how various childhood adversities and living conditions predict leisure-time physical inactivity in early adulthood and b) to find out whether these associations are mediated through the respondent’s own education.

Methods:

Young adults aged 18−29 were used from the Health 2000 Study of the Finnish. The cross-sectional data were based on interviews and questionnaires including retrospective information on childhood circumstances. The analyses were carried out on 68% of the original sample (N = 1894). The outcome measure was leisure-time physical inactivity.

Results:

Only a few of the 11 childhood adversities were related with physical activity in early adulthood. Having been bullied at school was associated with physical inactivity independently of the other childhood circumstances and the respondent’s own education. Low parental education predicted leisure-time physical inactivity in men and the association was mediated by the respondent´s own education. Respondents with only primary or vocational education were more likely to be physically inactive during leisure-time compared with those with secondary or higher education.

Conclusions:

There is some evidence that few specific childhood adversities, especially bullying at school, have long-lasting effects on physical activity levels.

Restricted access

Kathleen Y. Wolin and Gary G. Bennett

Background:

The interrelations between various physical activity domains have received little empirical attention in the United States. Of particular interest, given the potential applicability to traditionally underserved communities, is the nature of the association between occupational physical activity (OPA) and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA).

Methods:

5448 adult men and women who participated in NHANES 1999–2000 were included in analyses. Linear regression was used to examine the bivariate and multivariable associations of OPA and education with LTPA. Generalized logit models were used to examine the association of education with OPA.

Results:

We found no association between education and LTPA. OPA was significantly positively associated with LTPA (P < .001). The association between OPA and LTPA was not strongest among those with low education and held only for men in gender-stratified analysis. Education was inversely associated with OPA (P < .001) in multivariable analysis.

Conclusions:

Our findings lend preliminary support to the hypothesis that OPA is an important determinant of LTPA, particularly in men. This provides additional support to calls for assessment of OPA, particularly among individuals of low social class.

Open access

Inácio Crochemore M. da Silva, Grégore I. Mielke, Andréa D. Bertoldi, Paulo Sergio Dourado Arrais, Vera Lucia Luiza, Sotero Serrate Mengue and Pedro C. Hallal

) relative difference in leisure-time physical activity between male and female according to age groups and (2) absolute differences in leisure-time physical activity between socioeconomic position according to age groups among males and females. Relative differences were analyzed through prevalence ratio

Restricted access

Byron J. Kemp, Anne-Maree Parrish, Marijka Batterham and Dylan P. Cliff

active chores/work change between late childhood (10–11 y), early adolescence (12–13 y), and mid-adolescence (14–15 y)? and (2) Are these changes moderated by sex, socioeconomic position, language spoken at home, Indigenous status, or geographical remoteness? Based on national cross-sectional statistics

Restricted access

Stephen Hunter, Valerie Carson, Anna Timperio, Jo Salmon, Alison Carver and Jenny Veitch

correlates among children and adolescents. 18 Evidence also suggests young people from lower socioeconomic position (SEP), regardless of age, engage in less physical activity 19 and more screen time, 20 , 21 and have different play locations and more independent mobility. 22 In addition, differences in

Restricted access

Nicola W. Burton, Gavin Turrell and Brian Oldenburg

Background.

This study assessed item nonresponse (INR) in a population-based mail survey of physical activity (PA).

Methods.

A questionnaire was mailed to a random sample, with a 57% response rate (n = 2532). The magnitude and type of PA INR and the association with sociodemographic variables was examined using logistic regression.

Results.

Among survey respondents, 28% had incomplete PA data; 11% missed 1 item, 11% missed 2 items, and 5% missed all 3 items. Respondents missing 3 items tended to be female, less educated, low income, in poor health, and current smokers. The walking item was missed by 8% of respondents, and 18% and 23% missed the vigorous-intensity and moderate-intensity PA items respectively. These groups were sociodemograpically different from those without INR. Incomplete PA data was also associated with sociodemographic INR.

Conclusions.

Mail surveys may underrepresent individuals insufficiently active for health, in particular those of low socioeconomic position.

Full access

Jitka Jancova-Vseteckova, Martin Bobak, Ruzena Kubinova, Nada Capkova, Anne Peasey, Michael G. Marmot and Hynek Pikhart

Background:

The aim was to examine the association of objective measures of physical functioning (PF) with education and material circumstances and the decline in PF with age by socioeconomic position (SEP).

Methods:

In 3,205 subjects (60–75 years) from the Czech Republic, we assessed relationship between PF, SEP, and age. Linear regression was used to assess PF measures and SEP measures.

Results:

Cross-sectional decline in PF by age was similar in all individuals. Differences between SEP groups were similar across age groups, except for the difference in walk speed by material circumstances in men—bigger at older ages (p = .004). Men and women with the highest education were about 2 s faster at the chair rise test than those with the lowest education.

Discussion:

Findings suggest strong educational gradient in PF, an inconsistent role of self-assessed material circumstances, and virtually no interaction of SEP with the cross-sectional decline in PF by age.