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Erik K.M. Kjeldsen

This study utilized alumni of one sport management graduate program in an effort to investigate career paths in sport management. A representative sample of 126 alumni was selected from a population of 251 students who had graduated over a 10-year period. A total of 69 usable returns were received, for a response rate of 54.8%. Specific points during the professional, preparation period and during the working career were examined as benchmarks in the career path. The number of alumni maintaining jobs in the field at each benchmark shed light on career retention and on the factors contributing to attrition. The five benchmarks selected were entry into the graduate program, exit from the program, the internship, first job, and final job. Salary at each job level and satisfaction were measured in an effort to better understand the nature of a sport management career. The analysis was differentiated by sex and by the various subfields in the sport management profession.

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David Pierce and James Johnson

where sport management students take courses primarily taught by faculty in other related disciplines (e.g., kinesiology, tourism, leisure, business, recreation). Faculty outside of sport management may neither have experience in sport management career opportunities nor be able to provide appropriate

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Molly Hayes Sauder, Michael Mudrick and Jaime R. DeLuca

demographic makeup of the sport industry. Likewise, a significant theme from Leberman and Shaw’s ( 2015 ) work was that being a woman hindered one’s sport management career, partly due to the shortcomings of the academic experience. In particular, participants cited a disconnect between schooling and industry

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Janet B. Parks

This study investigated the employment status of the alumni of a large undergraduate sport management program. Information was collected and analyzed relative to demographics, graduate school status, placement strategies, current positions, and salaries. Data treatment included descriptive statistics and chi-square. Statistically significant differences were found (a) between women and men relative to placement strategies, (b) between women and men relative to salaries, (c) between salaries of the major employment classifications, and (d) between salaries in positions related to sport management and those unrelated to sport management. Recommendations included encouragement of further investigation of the significant differences found in this study, utilization of the findings in career education, additional research focusing on career development rather than on employment status, and the use of more sophisticated research designs and more powerful statistical analyses in future studies of sport management career paths.

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Meg G. Hancock, Lindsey Darvin and Nefertiti A. Walker

identified as important factors for selecting sport management as a major ( Mathner & Martin, 2012 ). Hancock and Greenwell ( 2013 ) found that sport management students pursue a sport management degree, and presumably a sport management career, because of a general interest in sport and an interest in