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Johan Gouws

This paper outlines the sport management curricula adopted by the Rand Afrikaans University in South Africa. The literature that provided the framework and the local conditions that influenced the curriculum design are described. The differences between the curriculum models generally found in North America and the present model are noted.

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Bonnie L. Parkhouse

The current status of undergraduate and graduate curricula in sport management was examined in 83 institutions identified as offering sport management programs in the United States (40 undergraduate, 32 graduate, and 11 programs at both levels). Since only two Canadian institutions responded to this inquiry, definitive conclusions could not be drawn about the current status of sport management in Canada. However, several observations about them are made on the basis of external data. The findings of this study clearly indicate that sport management curricula varies markedly from one institution to another. In most cases the institution claims to have a program in sport management per se, but in reality course offerings are not sufficient to warrant even a minor or concentration in this area. Implications of current practices in sport management are discussed, and recommendations for future development are presented.

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Megan B. Shreffler, Samuel H. Schmidt and James Weiner

prepared for their future careers in the sport industry remains unanswered. Criticism of a lack of sport management curricula that relate to sales has come from sport industry leaders ( Southall et al., 2010 ). Furthermore, the requirement that students gain experience in the industry before applying for

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Megan B. Shreffler, Adam R. Cocco and Jacob R. Shreffler

The number of students enrolled in online courses continues to increase as the landscape of higher education evolves to meet the needs of the student population. With the growing number of online education students, and the necessity of programs to demonstrate learning effectiveness, it is essential for higher education institutions to compare the success of online students with their traditional classroom counterparts in terms of course outcomes (final project and course grades). This study used a quasi-experimental design to examine the relationship between the instructional delivery method (online vs. traditional classroom) and the course outcomes and satisfaction of students in selected sport management courses. Differences between instructional delivery method were found in motivational factors, satisfaction, and content knowledge. However, no significant differences were found with respect to final project and course grades. The findings from this study can assist sport management programs beginning to offer online education courses or looking to expand their online course offerings. The results demonstrate that instructional delivery method does not affect a student’s course outcomes in sport management courses, leaving them the ability to choose the educational delivery method best suited for their lifestyle and motivations.

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Jaime R. DeLuca and Jessica Braunstein-Minkove

Experiential learning has become a driving force of universities around the world, and is a crucial part of many sport management programs. This is particularly true given the competitive nature of the field and the rapid changes the industry continuously faces. This work seeks to reexamine the sport management curricula to ensure a progression and evolution toward a superior level of student preparedness for their internship experiences. Through the use of both quantitative and qualitative methods, our major findings recommend a focus on academic, experiential, and professional development. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed along with limitations and directions for further investigation.

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Andrea N. Eagleman and Erin L. McNary

As undergraduate sport management programs continue to grow and expand in the United States, and with the recently developed Commission on Sport Management Accreditation (COSMA) accreditation guidelines for such programs, it is important to examine the current status of undergraduate sport management curricula in the U.S. The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of each program’s curriculum and other program components such as the school/college in which each program is housed, program name, and degree(s) offered. A total of 227 undergraduate sport management programs were identified and examined using a content analysis methodology. Results revealed the percentage of programs offering specific sport management courses, as well as significant differences between programs based on the school in which the program is housed, the status of the university (public or private), and the university size. These findings, along with recommendations for future research, are presented in the discussion and conclusion sections.

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Melanie Sartore-Baldwin and Catherine Quatman-Yates

The purpose of this study was to introduce ethnographic research to students in two graduate-level sport management courses, assess the extent to which the students benefited throughout the duration of the project, and anticipate future benefits as a result of the project. In response to previous calls for a more thorough integration of theory, research, and practice within sport management curricula, a plan to integrate ethnography projects into a sport management human resource management course and a contemporary issues course was developed and implemented. The strengths and weaknesses of the project are discussed relative to student feedback received through journal excerpts and interviews from the students and instructor fieldnotes. Suggestions and guidelines for future uses of ethnography as a teaching tool are offered.

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Richard. L. Irwin, Richard M. Southall and William A. Sutton

In 2004, Andy Dolich (president of business operations for the National Basketball Association’s [NBA] Memphis Grizzlies), decried the lack of sales training in sport management curricula. In response to that criticism, this paper provides a history and description of a metadiscrete sales-training program recently developed and implemented at two universities. This paper is designed to serve as a blueprint for faculty interested in enhancing their understanding of the theoretical underpinnings and practical logistics of implementing a similar sales-training program in their curriculum. It is the authors’ contention that such programs, based on sound pedagogical principles, can enhance the process of reconnecting sport management curriculum to the 21st-century sport-industry.

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Kimberly A. Bush, Michael B. Edwards, Gareth J. Jones, Jessica L. Hook and Michael L. Armstrong

Recently, scholars of sport management have called for more research aimed at understanding how sport can be leveraged for social change. This interest has contributed to a burgeoning paradigm of sport management research and practice developed around using sport as a catalyst for broader human and community development. In order for sport practitioners to successfully develop, implement, and sustain these programs, integration of development-based theory and concepts are needed in sport management curricula. Service learning is one pedagogical approach for achieving this objective, and is well suited for promoting social change practices among students. This study assesses how participation in a sport-for-development (SFD) service learning project impacted the social consciousness and critical perspectives of sport management students. Results suggest the experience raised student’s awareness of community issues, developed a more holistic perspective on the role of service, and influenced their future careers.

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Joyce Olushola Ogunrinde

a result of our human endeavors. Chapter 6 ends Section 1 by capturing the complexities of exploring sport and the environment in how we teach this subject in our sport management curricula. The authors provide practical foundational steps to implementing a sport ES education, explain different