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Ceyda Mumcu and Gil Fried

Hello, my name is Beth and I am a junior at “University of K,” studying sport management. I want to take you through my journey of learning about sport analytics and what analytics means to me now. This semester, I am enrolled in a junior-level sport marketing class. I just completed an assignment

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Daniel F. Mahony and Brenda G. Pitts

While Weese recently recommended that JSM and NASSM become more practitioner-oriented, Cuneen and Parks argued that JSM and NASSM need to maintain a more theoretically-oriented approach. Further, Cuneen and Parks agreed with Weese's suggestion that a new practitioner-oriented journal could be developed in order to meet the current needs of practitioners and to provide opportunities for both types of research. The authors of this paper would like to go further and suggest that it is important to allow for both types of research within the various content areas. However, despite the popularity of sport marketing in North America, there is currently only one practitioner-oriented journal specializing in this area. The authors of this paper believe that there is an immediate need for a theoretical sport marketing journal that, together with the Sport Marketing Quarterly, will contribute to the development of this content area.

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Tim Wilson

By Eric C. Schwarz and Jason D. Hunter. Published 2018 by Routledge , New York, NY. $52.95 . 354 pp. ISBN: 978-1-138-06158-3 The third edition of Advanced Theory and Practice in Sport Marketing is an excellent resource for both sport management faculty and students. Eric C. Schwarz and Jason D

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Scott R. Swanson and Kevin P. Gwinner

Given the dearth of research on sport marketing curriculum, individual faculty are often left without access to substantial resources that aid in course design. Utilizing content analysis this study identifies current undergraduate sport marketing course topic areas, objectives, and presents a number of useful exercises. Significant differences between stated objectives and required exercises, as well as where a course originates are provided. The findings should assist new faculty in developing sport marketing courses, as well as aid current faculty in updating existing courses by providing new insights and ideas.

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Frank Pons

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Andy Gillentine and Clay Daughtrey

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E. Newton Jackson Jr

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Melissa Davies, Michael L. Naraine and Brandon Mastromartino

It was a busy month in the early summer of 2018 for the team at BrandNEW, an emerging player in the sport marketing consulting space. The firm had worked with several sports properties in both Canada and the United States, leading various social and traditional advertising campaigns for teams in

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Jimmy Sanderson, Sarah Stokowski and Elizabeth Taylor

social media marketing, promotion, and branding efforts in the future. Review of Literature Social Media and Intercollegiate Sport Marketing and Promotions Social media technologies have become a vibrant marketing and customer-engagement tool for sport organizations ( Abeza, O'Reilly, & Seguin, 2019

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Laurence Chalip

Research seeking to describe and explain the extraordinary attention received by the Olympic Games has elaborated useful models of fan interest and motivation. In this paper, implications for the theory and practice of marketing sport are reviewed. Olympics research shows that audience interest is maximized via the simultaneous presence of multiple narratives, embedded genres, and layered symbols. Multiple narratives create stories attractive to varied audience segments by recounting dramas of enduring cultural interest or by incorporating contemporary, nonsport political or social concerns. Embedded genres (e.g., festival, spectacle, ritual, game) appeal to a diverse audience by serving as parallel and simultaneous invitations to consumer interest. Appropriately layered symbols (e.g., awards, banners, flags, uniforms, anthems) promote spectator interest by making ceremonies and rituals representative of more than a mere game or contest. The use of multiple narratives, embedded genres, and layered symbols in the planning, design, and promotion of sporting events is discussed. These strategies are contrasted with positioning (i.e., communication strategies designed to obtain a unique representation for products in consumers' minds). It is argued that multiple narratives, embedded genres, and layered symbols function affectively and thereby complement positioning, which functions cognitively, as marketing strategies.