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Rory J. Mack, Jeff D. Breckon, Paul D. O’Halloran, and Joanne Butt

dialogue about their problem and therefore the potential for a CB intervention” ( Leahy, 2006 , p. 137). Nevertheless, published sport psychology interventions appear to place more emphasis on content than on the processes of relationship building and their delivery ( Longstaff & Gervis, 2016 ), and there

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Tracey Devonport, Andrew Lane, and Christopher L. Fullerton

Evidence from sequential-task studies demonstrate that if the first task requires self-control, then performance on the second task is compromised (Hagger, Wood, Stiff, & Chatzisarantis, 2010). In a novel extension of previous sequential-task research, the first self-control task in the current study was a sport psychology intervention, paradoxically proposed to be associated with improved performance. Eighteen participants (9 males, 9 females; mean age = 21.6 years, SD = 1.6), none of whom had previously performed the experimental task or motor imagery, were randomly assigned to an imagery condition or a control condition. After the collection of pretest data, participants completed the same 5-week physical training program designed to enhance swimming tumble-turn performance. Results indicated that performance improved significantly among participants from both conditions with no significant intervention effect. Hence, in contrast to expected findings from application of the imagery literature, there was no additive effect after an intervention. We suggest practitioners should be cognisant of the potential effects of sequential tasks, and future research is needed to investigate this line of research.

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Kylie McNeill, Natalie Durand-Bush, and Pierre-Nicolas Lemyre

the intervention process predominately with the facilitator also reported more marked improvements in their capacity to self-regulate and their experiences of burnout and well-being. This underscores the facilitator’s key role in delivering sport psychology interventions, a finding iterated in

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Anne J. Bryan

The case is made for using single-subject designs in evaluating psychological interventions for sport skills acquisition and performance enhancement. Advantages of single-subject designs are discussed, along with examples and considerations in the use of the A-B-A-B and multiple-baseline designs.

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Kristoffer Henriksen, Carsten Hvid Larsen, Louise Kamuk Storm, and Knud Ryom

Young competitive athletes are not miniature elite athletes; they are a distinct client group to whom sport psychology practitioners (SPPs) increasingly deliver services. Interventions with this client group are often undertaken by newly educated SPPs who are in need of good guiding principles. Yet, there is a lack of research informing SPPs’ work with this group. In this current study, semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted with four experienced practitioners about their most successful interventions in competitive youth sport. Analysis showed three major themes: (a) young athletes should be equipped with a holistic skills package that enables them to handle a number of existential challenges; (b) young athletes are embedded in an environment (coaches, experts, teammates etc.) that should be involved in the interventions; and (c) interventions with young athletes should maintain a long-term focus. These themes are discussed in the context of current literature on sport psychology service delivery.

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Ashley A. Hansen, Joanne E. Perry, John W. Lace, Zachary C. Merz, Taylor L. Montgomery, and Michael J. Ross

conducting inter-item correlations to statistically select items. Five domains of interest for sport psychology intervention were established (i.e., mental skills, mechanisms of success, support, sport-related distress, and performance satisfaction) and it was hypothesized that 5–6 items from each domain

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Sara Biondi, Cristiana Conti, Emmanouil Georgiadis, and Maurizio Bertollo

intervention in Italy, Luca moved to the United States of America to follow his dream to become an athlete in the intercollegiate division. This decision interrupted the onsite sport psychology intervention that occasionally continued online. One year later, and after Luca was diagnosed with cancer, he came

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Kristoffer Henriksen, Louise Kamuk Storm, Natalia Stambulova, Nicklas Pyrdol, and Carsten Hvid Larsen

. Based on interviews with expert sport psychology practitioners (SPPs), the present study investigates successful and less successful intervention experiences in two main contexts: competitive youth and elite senior sport. Successful sport psychology interventions are sensitized in the sense that they

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Claire-Marie Roberts

believed sport psychology interventions may help complement the treatment. During the initial conversation, I admitted that I had no awareness of the condition of VCD, or indeed no experience of working as part of a team involving a speech and language therapist or a respiratory consultant. The general

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Britton W. Brewer, Judy L. Van Raalte, Albert J. Petitpas, Alan D. Bachman, and Robert A. Weinhold

To assess the way in which sport psychology is portrayed in the media, the content and tone of all articles (N = 574) from three national newspapers in the United States that mentioned sport psychology from 1985-1993 were examined. Although few articles were focused primarily on sport psychology, a wide variety of sports and professionals were identified in association with sport psychology. Interventions noted explicitly were predominantly cognitive-behavioral procedures. Performance enhancement was the primary purpose of sport psychology consultation described in the articles. The vast majority of articles were neutral in tone toward sport psychology, portraying the field in objective terms. The findings suggest that the mass media can be used to promote accurate perceptions of sport psychology to the public.