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C. Richard King

This essay offers a critical reading of whiteness studies and its implications for the study of sporting worlds. It argues that, as promising as the deconstruction of whiteness might be, a series of epistemological and political problems accompany such inquiry. After reviewing the emergence of whiteness studies and the recent integration of this field into sport studies, I enumerate the liabilities and blind spots associated with the way many scholars conceptualize whiteness and its proper study. The essay closes with a set of alternatives designed to enhance understandings of race, culture, and power in sporting worlds.

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Katherine M. Jamieson

In this paper, the author explores the usefulness of Chicana feminist scholarship for sport studies. Gloria Anzaldua’s concept of mestizaje, Maria Lugones’s concept of coalescence, and Chela Sandoval’s concept of differential consciousness are relied upon to assert the relevance of Chicana scholarship for sport studies. More specifically the paper focuses on the usefulness of such scholarship for identifying the ways that citizen-subjects both align with and resist dominant ideologies in everyday life. Interviews with former and current softball athletes of various Latina/o ethnicities are used to illustrate the occupation of a middle space and the usefulness of a mestiza sport studies.

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Cole G. Armstrong, Theodore M. Butryn, Vernon L. Andrews and Matthew A. Masucci

by event organizers), and although all have unique teaching foci and research interests, the authors share a commitment to providing their university students with timely and critical insights related to the intersections of social issues and sport management/sport studies. To this end, while the

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Janet C. Harris

It is clear that sports are cultural performances, and as such they should be studied simultaneously at two levels. On the one hand we must examine the dramatic, expressive meanings that sports have for people who encounter them—the suited up level. At the same time, we need analyses that go below this to examine social structures within and beyond sports—the stripped down level. Our energies should be directed toward work that interrelates the two. Scholarship of this nature will force us to be more eclectic in our theoretical orientations, drawing on a broad array of social science and humanities frameworks. The broader and deeper our understanding of these frameworks, the more sophisticated and insightM will be our work, making it more likely to contribute in important ways to mainline social science theory. The term “sport sociology” seems too narrow in light of the need for simultaneous suited up and stripped down analyses of sports that embrace numerous disciplinary perspectives. A more apt term for this enterprise, combining reference to culture and to social structure in one stroke, is “sociocultural sport studies.”

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Craig Hyatt

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Janet C. Harris

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Maria J. Veri

Edited by Pirkko Markula

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Brian Wilson

By considering three main questions, this article develops an argument for rethinking existing approaches to understanding both sport-related social movements and “local” responses to globalizing forces in light of the emergence of Internet communication. They are: (a) How can extant conceptions of sport-related social movements be expanded to account for more advanced forms of cultural and political opposition that result from and are potentially enhanced by the Internet? (b) How does the link between the development of the Internet and the enhanced formation and functioning of (new) social movements offer a foundation from which to expand understandings of relationships between global sport-related influences and the responses of local cultures? (c) What methodological approaches are best suited for studying Internet-related forms of sport-related activist resistance? The article concludes that recent developments in communication technology have contributed to a situation in which there is immense revolutionary potential in sport-related contexts, and for sociologists (of sport) interested in contributing to activist projects.

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David Rowe and Callum Gilmour

Contemporary media sports culture is dominated by the West, and media sport studies has tended to focus on Western contexts. The Asia Pacific region is now a more significant feature of the global media sports cultural complex, however, through the increasingly lucrative export of Western sport television rights and merchandising, the staging of megamedia sports events in the region, the conspicuous role of sport stars from the Asia Pacific in Western sport competitions, and, in some cases, even a shift in the balance of institutional and economic power from West to East. Drawing mainly on the cases of association football (soccer), cricket, and basketball, this article identifies the complex and multidirectional flows of labor, capital, images, identities, and audiences into, from, and within the Asian media sports environment. It considers whether such developments might constitute de-, re-, or even post-Westernization and proposes the necessity of closer attention to these issues in critical media sport studies.