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Laura Misener and Nico Schulenkorf

With an increasing emphasis on the social value of sport and events, there has been a shift in focus regarding the management and development process of event projects as well as their associated outcomes. This shift is about emphasizing a more strategic approach to developing social benefits by recognizing and utilizing leverageable resources related to sport events as a means of fostering lasting social and economic change (Chalip, 2006; O’Brien & Chalip, 2007; Schulenkorf & Edwards, 2012). In this paper, we adapt and apply the asset-based community development (ABCD) approach as a means of developing a more action-oriented, community-based approach to leveraging the social assets of sporting events. In applying the ABCD approach, we aim to shift the focus of event-led projects away from attempts to “solve” social problems (i.e., deficit perspective) to enhancing the existing strengths of communities (i.e., strengths perspective). We reflect on case study findings that highlight the challenges and opportunities in realizing an ABCD approach for disadvantaged communities through an examination of a healthy lifestyle community event initiative in the Pacific Islands.

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Erik L. Lachance and Milena M. Parent

Volunteers have been recognized as indispensable resources for the survival and success of sport events ( Bang & Chelladurai, 2009 ). To date, current research on volunteers in sport events has examined the volunteer experience in relation to constructs, which include, but is not limited to

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Leeann M. Lower-Hoppe, Liz A. Wanless, Sarah M. Aldridge, and Daniel W. Jones

comprehensive experiential project—implemented in a sport event management undergraduate (face-to-face) course. The pedagogical strategies are described in relation to relevant scholarship and personal reflection, with successes, barriers, and implications for future practice discussed. Learning Theory

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Brent D. Oja, Henry T. Wear, and Aaron W. Clopton

A myriad of scholars have explored the notion of sport events as community assets in both fiduciary economic terms (e.g., Li, Blake, & Thomas, 2013 ; Mills & Rosentraub, 2013 ) and intangible terms (e.g., Burgan & Mules, 1992 ; Chalip, 2006 ; Gibson, 1998 ; Ritchie, 1984 ). Specific examples

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Larry Dwyer and Liz Fredline

As noted in Part I of Special Sport Events which appeared in Volume 22, Issue 4 of the Journal of Sport Management, sport events are increasingly contributing to the economic and social development of cities, regions, and countries. The justification to host large-scale sport events is often done on the role these events play in building social capital, attracting tourists, foster trade relations, enhance the host destination’s brand, and serve as catalysts for the development and improvements of infrastructures. It is imperative to understand the unique challenges of managing and marketing special sport events. We believe that Part I of the special issue on special sport events and this collection of articles (Part II) address many of the challenges related to these sport events. In the following pages, we outline the articles featured in the second issue devoted to the topic of special sport events.

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Larry Dwyer and Liz Fredline

Cities, regions, and countries are making increasing use of special sport events in their economic and social development mix. Governments and event organizers often justify special sport events on the grounds that such events can build social capital, attract visitors, foster trade, enhance the host destination’s brand, and serve as catalysts for the development of new infrastructure. As a result of the proliferation of special sport events, there is an increasing need to determine the means via which events do (and do not) contribute to their stated social and economic development objectives. Consequently, it is vital to understand the unique challenges of managing and marketing special sport events.

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Alana Thomson, Kristine Toohey, and Simon Darcy

The promise of a mass sport participation legacy as an outcome of hosting a large-scale sport event is commonly featured in bid documents and the political rhetoric surrounding large-scale sport events ( Reis, Frawley, Hodgetts, Thomson, & Hughes, 2017 ; Toohey, 2008 ). In this article, we

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Gareth J. Jones, Elizabeth Taylor, Christine Wegner, Colin Lopez, Heather Kennedy, and Anthony Pizzo

Sport events have long been utilized as platforms for bridging social divides and promoting community development ( Welty Peachey, Borland, Lobpries, & Cohen, 2015 ). Although positive social outcomes are often assumed to be inherent by-products of sport events, previous research highlights the

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Michelle Hayes, Kevin Filo, Caroline Riot, and Andrea Geurin

continue to scrutinize athletes’ time spent on social media during major sport events, with some suggesting that social media use could be affecting athlete performance and calling for social media bans during competitions ( Fynes-Clinton, 2012 ). Others have suggested that athletes replicate their daily

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David Fechner, Kevin Filo, Sacha Reid, and Robyn Cameron

America in 2017 ( International Event Group, 2018 ). In its early stages, sport event sponsorship was associated with a partnership between global brands and spectator sport events, such as the Olympic Games or FIFA World Cup ( Smith et al., 2016 ). However, sponsoring small-scale events has emerged as a