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Shawn Forde and Brian Wilson

American journalist Dave Zirin, King describes Zirin as a ‘radical sports journalist,’ who consistently addresses sport-related social issues (e.g., power relations, inequality, and human rights in sport) in his blog, books, and also in mainstream venues like Sports Illustrated . King’s view on the

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Tywan G. Martin, Jessica Wallace, Young Ik Suh, Kysha Harriell and Justin Tatman

A number of media reports have surfaced over the last couple of years citing many concerns about sport-related concussion (SRC) and its short- and long-term consequences. In particular, American football has received a significant amount of media coverage in this area. Published empirical studies

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Jeffrey J. Milroy, Stephen Hebard, Emily Kroshus and David L. Wyrick

seeking is delayed ( Asken, McCrea, Clugston, Snyder, & Houck, 2016 ). At present time, it is estimated that between 12% and 60% of athletes delay seeking care after sustaining a concussion. Differences in sport-related concussion (SRC) care seeking have been attributed to a number of different immutable

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Ryan D. Henke, Savana M. Kettner, Stephanie M. Jensen, Augustus C.K. Greife and Christopher J. Durall

Clinical Scenario Historically, adolescent athletes with sport-related concussion (SRC) have been advised to abstain from physical activity until asymptomatic, at which point they may begin a graduated return to sport protocol. 1 Some researchers, however, have proposed that subsymptom

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Tamara C. Valovich McLeod, Megan N. Houston and Cailee E. Welch

Concussions resulting from sports and recreational activities are a significant concern in the pediatric population. The number of children and adolescents sustaining sport-related concussions is increasing and, as a result, legislation has been passed in all 50 states to ensure appropriate recognition and referral of pediatric athletes following concussion. The developing brain may make the diagnosis, assessment, and management of concussion more challenging for health care providers and requires the use of specific age-appropriate assessment tools. Concussion management must also include considerations for cognitive and physical rest, a collaborative concussion management team that includes medical and school personnel, and more conservative stepwise progressions for returning to school and to physical activity.

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Bradley J. Baker, Jeremy S. Jordan and Daniel C. Funk

behavioral intention as a proxy for behavior may be inappropriate, resulting in misleading conclusions ( Yoshida, Heere, & Gordon, 2015 ). The primary purpose of this study was to analyze the satisfaction–repeat patronage behavior relationship in the context of a sport-related experience product, namely a

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Sun J. Kang, Jae-Pil Ha and Marion E. Hambrick

The popularity of smartphones has led to the creation of sport-related mobile applications in the areas of games, fitness, information, and events for sport consumers. The main purpose of this study was to examine why college students use sport-related mobile applications and what benefits they received from their usage. The study employed the Motivation Scale for Sport Online Consumption and the Technology Acceptance Model to understand this usage in more detail. Using a mixed-method approach, the study revealed that college students identified fanship, convenience, and information as primary motives for using their sport-related mobile applications. For college students who are sport fans, supporting their fanship through these applications represents an important aspect of their lifestyle. Sport managers and sport application developers will benefit from understanding users’ intentions and motives as the market for sport-related applications continues to grow.

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Cheryl Mallen, Julie Stevens and Lorne J. Adams

This study systematically examined the extent of environmental sustainability (ES) research within the sport-related journal sample of academic literature to identify areas of under-emphasis and recommend directions for future research. The data collection and analysis followed a content analysis framework. The investigation involved a total of 21 sport-related academic journals that included 4,639 peer-reviewed articles published from 1987 to 2008. Findings indicated a paucity of sport-ES research articles (n = 17) during this time period. Further analysis compared the sport-ES studies within the sample to research in the broader management literature. A research agenda is suggested to advance sport-ES beyond the infancy stage.

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Michael McCrea and Matthew R. Powell

This article reviews the essential components of a practical, evidenced-based approach to the management of sport-related concussion in an ambulatory care setting. The model presented is based on the core philosophy that concussion assessment and management be approached from the biopsychosocial perspective, which recognizes the medical/physiological, psychological, and sociological factors that influence recovery and outcome following concussion. Based on the biopsychosocial paradigm, we outline a care delivery model that emphasizes an interdisciplinary approach in which the clinical neuropsychologist is a key participant. We discuss the importance of nonmedical, psychoeducational interventions introduced during the acute phase to facilitate recovery after sport-related concussion. Finally, using the local experience of our “Concussion Clinic” as a backdrop, we offer two separate case studies that demonstrate the value of this model in evaluating and managing athletes after sport-related concussion. The overall objective of this paper is to provide an adaptable template that neuropsychologists and other healthcare providers can use to improve the overall care of athletes with sport-related concussion and civilians with mild traumatic brain injury.

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Joachim Kimmerle, Kim-Kristin Gerbing, Ansgar Thiel and Ulrike Cress

This research note provides an explorative analysis of sport-related knowledge exchange about Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) on the Internet. Data are taken from a qualitative content analysis of the largest German-speaking Internet sport portal. Knowledge exchange about CAM in these Internet fora is characterized by the following phenomena: Users expected CAM to improve their performance and discussed a great variety of treatments based on primarily anecdotal knowledge. In addition, two main types of users (helpers and help-seekers) dominated the exchanges. The main reasons for seeking alternative medical help on the Internet were cases of prolonged illness and dissatisfaction with biomedical care.