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Steven Couture, Benoit Lamarche, Eliane Morissette, Veronique Provencher, Pierre Valois, Claude Goulet, and Vicky Drapeau

The objectives of this study were to evaluate high school coaches’ knowledge in sports nutrition and the nutritional practices they recommend to their athletes. Forty-seven high school coaches in “leanness” and “non-leanness” sports from the greater region of Quebec (women = 44.7%) completed a questionnaire on nutritional knowledge and practices. “Leanness sports” were defined as sports where leanness or/and low bodyweight were considered important (e.g., cheerleading, swimming and gymnastics), and “non-leanness sports” were defined as sports where these factors are less important (e.g., football). Participants obtained a total mean score of 68.4% for the nutrition knowledge part of the questionnaire. More specifically, less than 30% of the coaches could answer correctly some general nutrition questions regarding carbohydrates and lipids. No significant difference in nutrition knowledge was observed between coaches from “leanness” and “non-leanness” sports or between men and women. Respondents with a university education scored higher than the others (73.3% vs. 63.3%, p < .05). Coaches who participated in coaching certification also obtained better results than those without a coaching certification. The most popular source of information about nutrition used by coaches was the Internet at 55%. The two most popular nutrition practices that coaches recommended to improve athlete performance were hydration and consumption of protein-rich foods. Recommendation for nutritional supplements use was extremely rare and was suggested only by football coaches, a nonleanness sport. Findings from this study indicate that coaches need sports nutrition education and specific training.

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Rachel Lohman, Amelia Carr, and Dominique Condo

); therefore, little is currently known about this particular aspect of players’ nutritional intake. Sports nutrition knowledge is an understanding of the nutritional considerations and strategies specific to sports performance ( Spronk et al., 2015 ). It is one factor that can influence athletes’ nutritional

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Luc J.C. van Loon, Arie K. Kies, and Wim H.M. Saris

With the increasing knowledge about the role of nutrition in increasing exercise performance, it has become clear over the last 2 decades that amino acids, protein, and protein hydrolysates can play an important role. Most of the attention has been focused on their effects at a muscular level. As these nutrients are ingested, however, it also means that gastrointestinal digestibility and absorption can modulate their effcacy significantly. Therefore, discussing the role of amino acids, protein, and protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition entails holding a discussion on all levels of the metabolic route. On May 28–29, 2007, a small group of researchers active in the field of exercise science and protein metabolism presented an overview of the different aspects of the application of protein and protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition. In addition, they were asked to share their opinions on the future progress in their fields of research. In this overview, an introduction to the workshop and a short summary of its outcome is provided.

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Ronald J. Maughan

or particularly sports nutrition is especially prone to these problems is hard to know. It seems though, from the diverse topics encompassed by some of these activities, that the problem is more widespread. It behooves us all to be vigilant and to alert young and less experienced colleagues to the

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Claire Blennerhassett, Lars R. McNaughton, Lorcan Cronin, and S. Andy Sparks

nutrition knowledge of a group of experienced ultraendurance athletes. The study was approved by the departmental ethics committee. Phase 1: Adaptation of a Sports Nutrition Knowledge Questionnaire Participants Three groups with varying levels of sports nutrition knowledge were recruited to assess the

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Krystle E. Zuniga, Darcy L. Downey, Ryan McCluskey, and Carley Rivers

The majority of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) programs do not have a sports nutritionist, leaving athletes to gather information from resources that vary in reputability. The objective of this study was to identify a need for the development of accessible and reputable resources of nutrition information by assessing the current use of nutrition information resources, dietary habits, and sports nutrition knowledge among Division I collegiate athletes. Seventy-two athletes across eight sports completed questionnaires concerning nutrition resources used, dietary habits, and sports nutrition knowledge. In addition, interest levels in a mobile device application for delivery of nutrition information and tools were assessed. Primary sources for nutrition information included parents and family, athletic trainers (AT), and the internet/media, and athletes felt most comfortable discussing nutrition with parents and family, ATs, and strength and conditioning specialists. Performance on a sports nutrition knowledge questionnaire indicated a general lack of nutrition knowledge, and the high frequency of “unsure” responses suggested a lack of confidence in nutrition knowledge. Athletes conveyed a high likelihood that they would use a mobile device application as a nutrition resource, but were more interested in access to nutrition topics than tools such as a food log. We found that college athletes possess minimal sports nutrition knowledge, obtain nutrition information from nonprofessional resources, and were interested in utilizing a mobile device application as a resource. Further research is needed to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of alternative resources, such as a mobile device application, to deliver nutrition information and improve nutrition knowledge.

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Matthew David Cook and Mark Elisabeth Theodorus Willems

, M.J. , Mundel , T. , Hurst , S.M. , Hurst , R.D. , & Stannard , S.R. ( 2012 ). Effect of New Zealand blueberry consumption on recovery from eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage . Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 9 , 19 . PubMed ID: 22564864 doi:10

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Martin C. Waller, Deborah A. Kerr, Martyn J. Binnie, Emily Eaton, Clare Wood, Terreen Stenvers, Daniel F. Gucciardi, Carmel Goodman, and Kagan J. Ducker

the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority “check your substances” website (4.03 ± 1.10), sports nutrition staff (3.68 ± 1.10), and medical staff (3.40 ± 1.31; see Figure  3 ). Figure 3 —Sources of influence to use or not use sports and nutritional supplements. ASADA = Australian Sports Anti

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Jean Storlie

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José O. Ortega

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