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Shelby J. Martin and Timothy Anderson

.2% sought treatment for their eating problem, while 62.4% sought services for other mental health problems ( Mond, Hay, Rodgers, & Owen, 2007 ). The ego-syntonic nature of EP, as well as the higher rates of stigma associated with eating disorders than other mental illnesses ( Stewart, Keel, & Schiavo, 2006

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Rachel S. Wahto, Joshua K. Swift and Jason L. Whipple

The purposes of this study were to (a) examine the relationships between public stigma, self-stigma, and mental health help-seeking attitudes in college studentathletes, and (b) test whether referral source would have an impact on student-athletes’ willingness to seek mental health help. Participating college student-athletes (n = 43) completed an online survey including measures of stigma (public and self), attitudes, and willingness to seek mental health help. The results indicated that public stigma and self-stigma predicted a significant proportion of variance in attitudes (66%) above and beyond gender and treatment-use history. In addition, student-athletes were more willing to seek help when referred by a family member compared with a coach (d = 0.89), a teammate (d = 1.05), or oneself (d = 1.28). The results have important implications for helping student-athletes seek mental health help when there is a need.

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Robert C. Hilliard, Lorenzo A. Redmond and Jack C. Watson II

appear to be underutilized by student-athletes ( López & Levy, 2013 ; Moreland et al., 2018 ). Although numerous barriers have been identified for student-athletes seeking mental health services ( López & Levy, 2013 ; Moore, 2017 ; Moreland et al., 2018 ; Watson, 2006 ), stigma has been consistently

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Gavin Breslin, Stephen Shannon, Kyle Ferguson, Shauna Devlin, Tandy Haughey and Garry Prentice

visible in athlete populations, with a lack of help-seeking behaviors being attributed to stigma wherein help-seeking is considered a sign of weakness in a culture of competition and high performance ( Putukian, 2016 ). Despite an upsurge of population-wide government-funded mental health awareness

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Matthew D. Bird, Graig M. Chow, Gily Meir and Jaison Freeman

numerous barriers they face when seeking help. Barriers faced by student-athletes include stigma ( Gulliver, Griffiths, & Christensen, 2012 ), a lack of time ( Lopez & Levy, 2013 ), and a less favorable attitude toward help-seeking when compared to non-athletes ( Watson, 2005 ). Online counseling (OC

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Adam Kern, William Heininger, Emily Klueh, Stephanie Salazar, Barbara Hansen, Trish Meyer and Daniel Eisenberg

Student-athletes experience mental health problems, but they often encounter barriers to seeking help. This study reports findings from the pilot phase of Athletes Connected (AC), a new research and practice program at the University of Michigan addressing mental health and help-seeking behaviors among collegiate student-athletes. Members of the AC team gave presentations consisting of contact- and education-based interventions to every varsity athletic team at a large Division I Midwestern university, along with pre- and postsurvey questionnaires to measure their efficacy. The presentations included an educational overview of mental health, two videos highlighting former student-athletes’ struggles with mental illnesses, and a discussion at the end with the former athletes portrayed in the videos. A total of 626 student-athletes completed the pre- and postsurveys. Results indicated significant increases in knowledge and positive attitudes toward mental health and help-seeking. These results suggest that brief contact- and education-based interventions may be helpful in reducing stigma and promoting help-seeking behavior among college student-athletes.

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Shaun E. Edmonds and Susan G. Zieff

In recent years, individuals who do not conform to healthist body shape and weight norms are the target of an increasingly fervent moral panic about “obesity” (Gard & Wright, 2005). As a subculture within the gay male community (Wright, 1997a), the “Bear” community offers a site for examining biopolitical resistance to the pervasive body ideals (and associated fat stigma) embedded within, and perpetuated by, mainstream gay values. Utilizing in-depth interviews and participant observation, this study explores the ways in which Bears negotiate physical activity and body image within the ostensibly fat-positive Bear community. In analyzing the stories and spaces of the Bear community, I find diverse experiences that reveal a complex relationship between sexuality, body image, and engagement in physical activity.

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Isobelle J.R. Biggin, Jan H. Burns and Mark Uphill

Research suggests elite athletes have an equal—or, in some circumstances, possibly higher—probability of developing mental ill-health as the general population. However, understanding of these issues among athletes and coaches remains largely limited. The perceptions of mental-health problems among 19 elite athletes and 16 coaches were explored using two concurrent three-round Delphi surveys whose responses were compared. Athletes and coaches expressed different opinions and experiences of mental ill-health among elite athletes. However, both groups felt the pressure athletes place on themselves is a significant contributing factor and that obsessional compulsive tendencies and anxiety may be particularly prevalent. While associated stigma was thought to be a barrier to seeking support, both groups felt sport and clinical psychologists would provide the most appropriate support, with coaches playing an important signposting role. Implications for athletes, coaches, and clinical and sport psychologists are explored and suggestions for future research are presented.

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Kelly P. Arbour, Amy E. Latimer, Kathleen A. Martin Ginis and Mary E. Jung

This study examined whether the positive impressions formed of able-bodied exercisers extend to people with a physical disability. Participants (226 women and 220 men) read a description of a man or woman with a spinal cord injury who was described as an exerciser, nonexerciser, or control, and then rated the target (i.e., the person being described in the vignette) on 17 personality and 9 physical dimensions. Results revealed significantly more favorable ratings for the exerciser than both the nonexerciser and control on almost all dimensions. Additionally, the male control target was rated more favorably than the female counterpart on three personality and two physical attributes. Evidently, the exerciser stereotype may undermine negative impressions of people with physical disabilities.

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Emily Kroshus, Jessica Wagner, David L. Wyrick and Brian Hainline

, & Gross, 2016 ). Early and appropriate mental health care is critical for limiting the morbidity of mental illness ( Kessler et al., 2007 ). Barriers to care seeking are often heightened among athletes due to perceived stigma or a belief that care seeking would decrease athletic participation