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Daniel B. Bornstein, Russell R. Pate, and David M. Buchner

Background:

Efforts to increase population levels of physical activity are increasingly taking the form of strategic plans at national, state/regional, and local levels. The processes employed for developing such plans have not been described previously. The purpose of this article is to chronicle the processes employed in and lessons learned from developing the US National Physical Activity Plan (NPAP).

Methods:

The Coordinating Committee oversaw development of the NPAP. Key steps in the process included creating a private–public coalition based in the private sector, organizing the NPAP around 8 societal sectors, reviewing the evidence base for promotion of physical activity in each sector, conducting a national conference to initiate development of the NPAP’s core content, ensuring broad participation in developing and refining the NPAP, and launching the NPAP through a press event that attracted national attention.

Results and Conclusion:

The 3-year effort to develop the NPAP was guided by a private–public collaborative partnership involving private sector organizations and government agencies. Launched in May 2010, the NPAP included more than 250 evidence-based recommendations for changes to policy and practice at the national, state, and local levels across 8 societal sectors.

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Trevor Slack and Bob Hinings

Edited by Lucie Thibault

While it is one of the central topics in the study of organizations, the concept of strategy has received little attention in the sport management literature. This paper is, in part, designed to help fill some of this void. Specifically, the purpose of the paper is to empirically verify a framework proposed by Thibault, Slack, and Hinings (1993) for the analysis of strategy in nonprofit sport organizations and to locate a sample of national level sport organizations within this framework according to their strategic type. The results of the study support the existence and utility of the two dimensions identified in Thibault et al.'s framework. They also reveal that there are common characteristics within the organizations that constitute each of the framework's four strategic types. The identification of these characteristics provides us with a preliminary understanding of the strategic initiatives being pursued by those sport organizations.

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Jason R. Carter, Nancy I. Williams, and Wojtek J. Chodzko-Zajko

Building departmental visibility and support is essential to the success of any kinesiology unit. This paper provides an overview of different strategies taken by three American Kinesiology Association member departments to advance their respective units. Each program was faced with unique institutional goals and structures, yet each institutional example highlights the shared theme of building strategic partnerships and cultivating a culture of entrepreneurship and innovation. Common strategies across the three institutions included a genuine understanding of university priorities and politics, chair and faculty leadership, strong internal and external communication, a willingness to lead and think creatively, and maintaining a focus on academic and educational excellence.

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Kristen A. Morrison and Katie E. Misener

, competitive advantage, and position (e.g.,  Pettigrew, 1985 , 2012 ; Porter, 1980 ). In order to develop effective organizational strategies, nonprofit leaders may engage in a deliberative strategic planning process in order to “produc[e] fundamental decisions and actions that shape and guide what an

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Frederik Ehlen, Jess C. Dixon, and Todd M. Loughead

importance of vision and values as being fundamental to the nature of strategic leadership and in setting an organization’s sense of direction. Additionally, the interview highlights the importance of strategic planning to create corporate value. Interviewer: How did you become the CEO of MLSE? Peddie: It

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Jamee A. Pelcher and Brian P. McCullough

This past April 22 (Earth Day), Smallville University (SU) President Williams expanded the campus’ environmental sustainability commitment by mandating that all departments on campus must have a strategic plan in place to address their respective environmental impacts by 2020 to establish specific

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Kylie McNeill, Natalie Durand-Bush, and Pierre-Nicolas Lemyre

, wherein coaches (a) set personal goals and preferred standards and create strategic plans to achieve them (i.e.,  forethought/preparation ), (b) carry out their plans and monitor their performance (i.e.,  performance/execution ), and (c) evaluate their performance outcomes and adapt their plans as needed

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Mary E. Rudisill

Over the past 35 years, institutions of higher education have been involved in strategic planning in an attempt to promote their priorities and remain competitive in challenging economic times. Efforts have been made to improve the process and effectiveness of strategic planning over those years. Although strategic planning can be effective, the plan must be created properly and also implemented in an effective manner. Since online learning has become an increasingly important revenue source for many institutions of higher education, as well as an alternative way to provide instruction to students, it is typically included within institutional strategic plans and prioritized for growth. Ensuring that faculty “buy-in” to this goal and strategic priorities requires significant faculty engagement. In this paper, options for implementation and ways to promote engagement are discussed within a case study of how Auburn University kinesiology faculty took part in educational transformation and innovation by connecting to the campus mission.

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Meera Sreedhara, Karin Valentine Goins, Christine Frisard, Milagros C. Rosal, and Stephenie C. Lemon

improve opportunities for PA in communities. Interventions that increase utilization of strategic planning processes among LHDs to address land use and transportation systems require further investigation. Perceived and objective safety are well-known barriers to active transportation, 35 , 36 but a

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Ole Winthereik Mathorne, Kristoffer Henriksen, and Natalia Stambulova

representing the triangle organizations. The CSF model (Figure  2 ) has its starting point in the preconditions (e.g., financial, human, facilities, and time) provided by each organization in the collaboration. Then, the model illustrates how the processes (e.g., strategic planning, communication, coordination