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Milena M. Parent

next day, Amanda dug into the files on her predecessor’s computer, looking for anything resembling a strategic or operational plan. She found mention of a strategic plan in the previous year’s AGM as an appendix to the AGM’s minutes. The one-page document looked to be very high level. The vision

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David Bellar, Todd A. Gilson, and James C. Hannon

Higher education is in a period of flux. For many public institutions, state support has decreased over the past decade, resulting in the notion of doing more with less. Using an inverted triangle approach, this article examines how both institutions and departments are coping with their present reality using innovative and entrepreneurial ideas. First, the story of how public institutions in the state of Illinois are responding to decreased state appropriations and declining K–12 enrollments is discussed. Second, a rich example of how one institution completed the strategic planning process—from conceptualization to implementation—is shared. Finally, one department’s multifaceted plan to handle declining state support is shared.

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Jamee Pelcher, Sylvia Trendafilova, and Vassilios Ziakas

. The Task Ahead Jackie is facing the task of developing a strategic plan for hosting a sustainable golf tournament. Evaluation and planning helps course managers to balance the demands of golf with their responsibility to the natural environment. An initial site assessment followed by an environmental

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Suzannah Armentrout, Jen Zdroik, and Julia Dutove

Operational Planning Every business must have a strategy, and a strategic plan is a key determinant for how an organization will perform ( Lussier & Kimball, 2020 ). Strategic planning is explained by Lussier and Kimball ( 2020 ) as when executives develop a mission statement and corresponding long

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Trevor Slack and Bob Hinings

Edited by Lucie Thibault

While it is one of the central topics in the study of organizations, the concept of strategy has received little attention in the sport management literature. This paper is, in part, designed to help fill some of this void. Specifically, the purpose of the paper is to empirically verify a framework proposed by Thibault, Slack, and Hinings (1993) for the analysis of strategy in nonprofit sport organizations and to locate a sample of national level sport organizations within this framework according to their strategic type. The results of the study support the existence and utility of the two dimensions identified in Thibault et al.'s framework. They also reveal that there are common characteristics within the organizations that constitute each of the framework's four strategic types. The identification of these characteristics provides us with a preliminary understanding of the strategic initiatives being pursued by those sport organizations.

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Gil Fried

Gil Giles has a passion for softball and wanted to turn his passion into his second career. After retiring from the police force he decided to invest at least $2.8 million (including borrowing $1.7 million) in building a six field sportsplex. Although the research and the numbers did not support his decision, his passion was so strong that he decided to take the risk. While he enjoys the thought of owning a sports facility, the reality of day to day management and paying the bills is another story. This case study examines the financial and strategic underpinning for building the facility. From analyzing potential revenue streams and expenses to the profit margin for concession goods, Gil will need to pinch every penny to make his facility financially viable. Luckily he hired a manager to help run the facility, but if he had several rain-outs, or fails to attract the leagues he hopes for, his financial plans could be ruined. Is it ever safe to have a business model with such thin margins?

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Kristen A. Morrison and Katie E. Misener

, competitive advantage, and position (e.g.,  Pettigrew, 1985 , 2012 ; Porter, 1980 ). In order to develop effective organizational strategies, nonprofit leaders may engage in a deliberative strategic planning process in order to “produc[e] fundamental decisions and actions that shape and guide what an

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Frederik Ehlen, Jess C. Dixon, and Todd M. Loughead

importance of vision and values as being fundamental to the nature of strategic leadership and in setting an organization’s sense of direction. Additionally, the interview highlights the importance of strategic planning to create corporate value. Interviewer: How did you become the CEO of MLSE? Peddie: It

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Jamee A. Pelcher and Brian P. McCullough

This past April 22 (Earth Day), Smallville University (SU) President Williams expanded the campus’ environmental sustainability commitment by mandating that all departments on campus must have a strategic plan in place to address their respective environmental impacts by 2020 to establish specific

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Kylie McNeill, Natalie Durand-Bush, and Pierre-Nicolas Lemyre

, wherein coaches (a) set personal goals and preferred standards and create strategic plans to achieve them (i.e.,  forethought/preparation ), (b) carry out their plans and monitor their performance (i.e.,  performance/execution ), and (c) evaluate their performance outcomes and adapt their plans as needed