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Nicole M.S. Belanger and Julie Hicks Patrick

support (ie, companionship, informational, and esteem support) are still not clearly understood in this population. Thus, the current study examined the differential effects of source and type of social support on the frequency of college studentsphysical activity behaviors. Physical Activity Trends

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Jennifer P. Agans, Oliver W.A. Wilson, and Melissa Bopp

, Piñero JC , Bridges DM . A meta-analysis of college studentsphysical activity behaviors . J Am Coll Health . 2005 ; 54 ( 2 ): 116 – 126 . PubMed ID: 16255324z doi:10.3200/JACH.54.2.116-126 10.3200/JACH.54.2.116-126 16255324 2. Suminski RR , Petosa R , Utter AC , Zhang JJ . Physical

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Leigh Ann Ganzar, Nalini Ranjit, Debra Saxton, and Deanna M. Hoelscher

policies on student physical activity behavior was moderated by economic disadvantage or geographic location of schools. All analyses were conducted in Stata (version 14.2; StataCorp LP, College Station, TX). Results Table  2 presents descriptive statistics for school-level policy variables, and Table  3

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Mireille Blais

Most of the existing ecological studies have been conducted during class instructional time. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe (a) how students (N = 102; grade 2–4) engaged in a strategy named Health Passport taking place mainly outside of school time and (b) how four physical education teachers held students accountable for their involvement in physical activity during a long period of time (3–7 months). An inductive approach guided the data analysis, based on observational notes, interviews, and the content of the students’ Health Passport. The results indicated that children displayed five different profiles of involvement in the completion of the tasks related to their passport. Physical education teachers chose to trust students’ self-management capacity instead of using a formal evaluation to hold them accountable. The experiment of the Health Passport showed that physical education teachers can put together and implement accountability strategies to support students’ regular practice of physical activity at home.

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Senlin Chen and Ang Chen

Expectancy beliefs and task values are two essential motivators in physical education. This study was designed to identify the relation between the expectancy-value constructs (Eccles & Wigfield, 1995) and high school students’ physical activity behavior as associated with their energy balance knowledge. High school students (N = 195) in two healthful-living programs (i.e., combination of physical and health education) responded to measures of expectancy-value motivation, energy balance knowledge, in-class physical activity, and after-school physical activity. The structural equation modeling confirmed positive impact from expectancy beliefs and interest value to in-class physical activity (Path coefficient range from .19 to .26, ps < .01). Cost perception was found exerting a negative impact on after-school physical activity but a positive one on lower level of understanding of energy balance (Path coefficient range from -.33 to -.39, ps < .01). The findings painted a complex but meaningful picture about the motivational impact of expectancy-value constructs on physical activity and energy balance knowledge. School healthful-living programs should create motivational environments that strengthen students’ expectancy beliefs and interest value and alleviate their negative perceptions and experiences.

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Oliver W.A. Wilson, Michael J. Panza, M. Blair Evans, and Melissa Bopp

order to acquire a comprehensive list of sources examining college student physical activity behaviors. Participant inclusion/exclusion criteria were selected to critically analyze literature focused on college student physical activity, focus conclusions on an important developmental period, and limit

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Pierre Van Luchene and Cécile Delens

:10.1080/07448480903221392 10.1080/07448480903221392 5. Keating XD , Guan J , Piñero JC , Bridges DM . A meta-analysis of college studentsphysical activity behaviors . J Am Coll Health . 2005 ; 54 ( 2 ): 116 – 126 . PubMed ID: 16255324 doi:10.3200/JACH.54.2.116-126 16255324 10

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Diane L. Gill

policies were significantly related to student physical activity behavior and that policies had stronger effects for economically disadvantaged schools. Although not specifically identified with sport and exercise psychology, the work of Bess Marcus on physical activity promotion is notable. Marcus and her

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Oliver W.A. Wilson, Scott Graupensperger, M. Blair Evans, and Melissa Bopp

10, 2018. 12. Keating XD , Guan J , Piñero JC , Bridges DM . A meta-analysis of college studentsphysical activity behaviors . J Am Coll Health . 2005 ; 54 ( 2 ): 116 – 126 . PubMed ID: 16255324 doi:10.3200/JACH.54.2.116-126 10.3200/JACH.54.2.116-126 16255324 13. CDC . Nutrition

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Marianne I. Clark and Matthew W. Driller

. , Piñero , J.C. , & Bridges , D.M. ( 2005 ). A meta-analysis of college studentsphysical activity behaviors . Journal of American College Health, 54 ( 2 ), 116 – 126 . PubMed ID: 16255324 doi:10.3200/JACH.54.2.116-126 10.3200/JACH.54.2.116-126 Kim , Y. , Lumpkin , A. , Lochbaum , M