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Anthony Rossi, Tina Claiborne, and Jamie Fetter

Key Points ▸ Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the leading cause of sudden death in young athletes and occurs three times more often in athletes than in nonathletes. ▸ Physical exams, personal history, and family history alone may not be enough to identify risk factors. ▸ Of patients with SCD, 80% are

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Ralph A. Vernacchia, James R. Reardon, and David R. Templin

This study presents the case of a male university basketball player who died of a heart attack caused by an abnormal heart rhythm (Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome) and describes the various emotional stages his teammates and coaches experienced during the days and months following this tragic incident. The team’s emotional responses to their teammates’ sudden death were categorized into several stages: shock, confusion, and denial; performance resolve; realization of loss; glorification and memorialization; closure and relief; avoidance and debriefing; reentry and acceptance. A modified critical incident stress debriefing process was used by educational and clinical sport psychologists who collaborated to manage and provide care-giving services to team members and coaches.

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Anthony Rossi, Tina Claiborne, and Jamie Fetter

M , Basso C , Thiene G . Sudden cardiac death in athletes: can it be prevented by screening? Herz . 2009 ; 34 ( 4 ) 259 – 266 . PubMed doi:10.1007/s00059-009-3236-3 8. Patel V , Elliott P . Sudden death in athletes . Clin Med . 2012 ; 12 ( 30 ): 253 – 256 doi:10.7861/clinmedicine

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Riana R. Pryor, Robert A. Huggins, and Douglas J. Casa

The aim of the recent Inter-Association Task Force held in Washington, D.C. at the 2013 Youth Safety Summit determined best practice recommendations for preventing sudden death in secondary school athletics. This document highlights the major health and safety practices and policies in high school athletics that are paramount to keep student athletes safe. The purpose of this commentary is to review the findings of the document developed by the task force and to provide possible areas where research is needed to continue to educate medical practitioners, players, coaches, and parents on ways to prevent tragedies from occurring during sport.

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Column-editor : Robert I. Moss

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Malissa Martin, Suzanne M. Higgins, Eileen B. Radovan, and Rachel P. Streff

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John R. Mitrano

While researchers have examined the economic effects of sport franchise relocation on cities and municipalities, little research has explored the social psychological effects of relocation on the fans from the cities being abandoned. Through the use of “Virtual Participant Observation” and “Inter(net)viewing,” this paper examines the meanings fans attach to franchise relocation decisions and how they make sense of and adjust to the impending loss of a civic institution such as a sport franchise. The paper also examines the root metaphors created and used by fans in the expression of their feelings, experiences, and interpretations of (a) the relocation decision, (b) the relationship of the owners and team, and (c) the relationship of the fans and team. These metaphors enable fans to make sense of a particularly disruptive situation (i.e., franchise relocation)—a decision which violates normative American cultural assumptions, core tenets, and values.

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Grace Katt and Kevin C. Miller

Exertional heat stroke (EHS) is the most severe form of exertional heat illness (EHI) and is diagnosed when an athlete’s body’s core temperature exceeds 40.5 °C (105 °F) and they display central nervous system dysfunction. 1 EHS is one of the leading causes of sudden death in athletes. 2 In