Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 2,129 items for :

  • "supplement" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Protein Supplementation in Addition to Strength Training Programs for Improving Body Composition in Older Adults: What Else Is Left to Know? A Brief Update Review of the Current Evidence

Júlio Benvenutti Bueno de Camargo

( Berner et al., 2013 ; Krok-Schoen et al., 2019 ; Levine et al., 2014 ). Therefore, scientifically proven strategies that facilitate the ingestion of this macronutrient by older adults may be of great relevance in the clinical practice of health professionals. Adding protein supplementation (PS) to the

Restricted access

Protein Supplementation for Strength and Functionality in Older Adults: Is There Still Any Doubt? A Brief Update Review

Júlio Benvenutti Bueno de Camargo and Alexandre Ferraz de Oliveira

example, the reduced appetite usually observed in older subjects may turn increased protein consumption challenging. In this sense, protein supplementation (PS) may be a viable strategy due to its higher palatability, high protein density, easy management, and high leucine content (e.g., 3.8 g of leucine

Restricted access

Acute Ketone Salts–Caffeine–Taurine–Leucine Supplementation but not Ketone Salts–Taurine–Leucine, Improves Endurance Cycling Performance

Manuel D. Quinones and Peter W.R. Lemon

developed ketone supplements that induce a state of mild–modest nutritional ketosis acutely (approximately 1 hr). Importantly, this differs from dietary ketosis because these supplements allow a state of ketosis to be achieved with replete glycogen stores. Therefore, supplemental hyperketonemia has the

Restricted access

Individual Participant Data Meta-Analysis Provides No Evidence of Intervention Response Variation in Individuals Supplementing With Beta-Alanine

Gabriel Perri Esteves, Paul Swinton, Craig Sale, Ruth M. James, Guilherme Giannini Artioli, Hamilton Roschel, Bruno Gualano, Bryan Saunders, and Eimear Dolan

Beta-alanine (BA) supplementation is an established nutritional strategy to improve exercise capacity ( Saunders et al., 2017 ). This is likely due to its capacity to increase muscle carnosine (MCarn) content ( Rezende et al., 2020 ), which acts as an intracellular buffering agent ( Blancquaert et

Restricted access

Branched-Chain Amino Acid Supplementation Before Squat Exercise and Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

Yoshiharu Shimomura, Asami Inaguma, Satoko Watanabe, Yuko Yamamoto, Yuji Muramatsu, Gustavo Bajotto, Juichi Sato, Noriko Shimomura, Hisamine Kobayashi, and Kazunori Mawatari

The authors examined the effect of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation on squat-exercise-induced delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) using 12 young, healthy, untrained female participants. The experiment was conducted with a crossover double-blind design. In the morning on the exercise-session day, the participants ingested either BCAA (isoleucine:leucine:valine = 1:2.3:1.2) or dextrin at 100 mg/kg body weight before the squat exercise, which consisted of 7 sets of 20 squats/set with 3-min intervals between sets. DOMS showed a peak on Days 2 and 3 in both trials, but the level of soreness was significantly lower in the BCAA trial than in the placebo. Leg-muscle force during maximal voluntary isometric contractions was measured 2 d after exercise (Day 3), and the BCAA supplementation suppressed the muscle-force decrease (to ~80% of the value recorded under the control conditions) observed in the placebo trial. Plasma BCAA concentrations, which decreased after exercise in the placebo trial, were markedly elevated during the 2 hr postexercise in the BCAA trial. Serum myoglobin concentration was increased by exercise in the placebo but not in the BCAA trial. The concentration of plasma elastase as an index of neutrophil activation appeared to increase after the squat exercise in both trials, but the change in the elastase level was significant only in the placebo trial. These results suggest that muscle damage may be suppressed by BCAA supplementation.

Restricted access

Cordyceps Sinensis (CordyMax Cs-4) Supplementation Does Not Improve Endurance Exercise Performance

Allen C. Parcell, Jason M. Smith, Shane S. Schulthies, J. William Myrer, and Gilbert Fellingham

It is purported that supplementation with Cordyceps Sinensis (CordyMax Cs-4) will improve oxidative capacity and endurance performance. The intent of this investigation was to examine the effects of CordyMax Cs-4 supplementation on VO2peak, ventilatory threshold, and endurance performance in endurance-trained cyclists. Twenty-two male cyclists participated in 5 weeks of supplementation with CordyMax Cs-4 tablets (3 g/d). Training intensity was maintained by weekly documentation and reporting throughout the 5-week period. Subjects completed a VO2peak test and work-based time trial prior to and following the supplementation period. VO2peak was similar within and between placebo (PLA) and treatment (CS) groups prior to (59.9 ± 5.9 vs. 59.1 ± 5.4 ml/kg/min, respectively) and following (60.1 ± 5.5 vs. 57.1 ± 5.8 ml/kg/min, respectively) the supplementation period. Ventilatory threshold (VT) was measured at 72 ± 10% of VO2peak in P and T prior to supplementation and did not change in either group following the supplementation. PLA completed the time trial in 61.4 ± 2.4 min compared to 62.1 ± 4.0 min in T. Time trial measurements did not differ between groups, nor did they change in response to supplementation. It is concluded that 5 weeks of CordyMax Cs-4 supplementation has no effect on aerobic capacity or endurance exercise performance in endurance-trained male cyclists.

Open access

International Olympic Committee Expert Group Statement on Dietary Supplements in Athletes

International Olympic Committee Expert Group on Dietary Supplements in Athletes

Dietary supplements encompass a wide range of products, including essential nutrients (vitamins, minerals, proteins, amino acids, etc.), herbals and botanicals, and specific products with potential for maintenance of health and optimisation of performance. The use of dietary supplements is

Restricted access

The Effect of Beta-Alanine Supplementation on Isokinetic Force and Cycling Performance in Highly Trained Cyclists

Samuel T. Howe, Phillip M. Bellinger, Matthew W. Driller, Cecilia M. Shing, and James W. Fell

Beta-alanine may benefit short-duration, high-intensity exercise performance. The aim of this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study was to examine the effects of beta-alanine supplementation on aspects of muscular performance in highly trained cyclists. Sixteen highly trained cyclists (mean ± SD; age = 24 ± 7 yr; mass = 70 ± 7kg; VO2max = 67 ± 4ml·kg−1·min–1) supplemented with either beta-alanine (n = 8, 65 mg·kg−1BM) or a placebo (n = 8; dextrose monohydrate) over 4 weeks. Pre- and postsupplementation cyclists performed a 4-minute maximal cycling test to measure average power and 30 reciprocal maximal isokinetic knee contractions at a fixed angular velocity of 180°·sec−1 to measure average power/repetition, total work done (TWD), and fatigue index (%). Blood pH, lactate (La) and bicarbonate (HCO3 -) concentrations were measured preand postisokinetic testing at baseline and following the supplementation period. Beta-alanine supplementation was 44% likely to increase average power output during the 4-minute cycling time trial when compared with the placebo, although this was not statistically significant (p = .25). Isokinetic average power/repetition was significantly increased post beta-alanine supplementation compared with placebo (beta-alanine: 6.8 ± 9.9W, placebo: –4.3 ± 9.5 W, p = .04, 85% likely benefit), while fatigue index was significantly reduced (p = .03, 95% likely benefit). TWD was 89% likely to be improved following beta-alanine supplementation; however, this was not statistically significant (p = .09). There were no significant differences in blood pH, lactate, and HCO3 between groups (p > .05). Four weeks of beta-alanine supplementation resulted in worthwhile changes in time-trial performance and short-duration muscular force production in highly trained cyclists.

Restricted access

Caffeine Ingestion Improves Performance During Fitness Tests but Does Not Alter Activity During Simulated Games in Professional Basketball Players

Javier Raya-González, Aaron T. Scanlan, María Soto-Célix, Alejandro Rodríguez-Fernández, and Daniel Castillo

basketball teams, other strategies such as ingestion of ergogenic supplements are also adopted to further augment player performance. 4 It is well documented that caffeine supplementation provides performance benefits when performing high-intensity actions (eg, sprinting, jumping, changing direction

Restricted access

Dietary β-Alanine Intake Assessed by Food Records Does Not Associate With Muscle Carnosine Content in Healthy, Active, Omnivorous Men and Women

Nathalia Saffioti Rezende, Giulia Cazetta Bestetti, Luana Farias de Oliveira, Bruna Caruso Mazzolani, Fabiana Infante Smaira, Alina Dumas, Paul Swinton, Bryan Saunders, and Eimear Dolan

(MCarn) synthesis ( Harris et al., 2006 ), with meta-analytic data concluding that BA supplementation increases MCarn content ( Rezende et al., 2020 ), and represents a safe ( Dolan, Swinton et al., 2019 ) and effective ( Saunders, Elliott-Sale et al., 2017 ) strategy to enhance sustained, high