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Sara L. Giovannetti, Jessica R.G. Robertson, Heather L. Colquhoun and Cindy K. Malachowski

needs of their student-athletes? Methods Research Design A cross-sectional electronic survey design was used to gather data through open- and closed-ended questions. Survey questions were developed after an extensive literature review, which included appraisal of comparable surveys, such as the Healthy

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Chelsee A. Shortt, Collin A. Webster, Richard J. Keegan, Cate A. Egan and Ali S. Brian

Participants The selection of PL academics for the survey followed Delphi “expert” nomination recommendations ( Delbecq et al., 1975 ; Green, 2014 ). Using references from the literature analysis in Phase 1 of the study, a list of targeted survey participants ( N  = 53) was created. Information about these

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Scott W. Cheatham

survey and document responses in the knowledge, clinical application, and use of RM devices among allied health professionals in the United States. Methods This cross-sectional descriptive survey study was approved by the California State University Dominguez Hills Institutional Review Board (IRB

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Collin A. Webster, Diana Mîndrilă, Chanta Moore, Gregory Stewart, Karie Orendorff and Sally Taunton

515 individuals who participated in different parts of the study, described in the following sections (see “Procedures” section). Instrumentation We developed an online survey as part of a larger investigation of physical education teachers’ perceptions of CSPAPs. The final version of the survey

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Stephen Harvey and Brendon Hyndman

. 1020) and become commonplace within their educational practices ( Henderson et al., 2017 ; Selwyn, 2016 ; Veletsianos, 2016 ). In this study, we investigate reasons physical education (PE) professionals use Twitter through data generated from a mixed-method survey. We interrogate findings from the

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Johan Pelssers, Emalie Hurkmans, Jeroen Scheerder, Norbert Vanbeselaere, Steven Vos, Tim Smits and Filip Boen

Procedure The present study was part of a larger survey study on social capital, social support, exercise motivation, and exercise involvement among the older adults in Flanders, the Dutch-speaking region of Belgium ( Scheerder et al., 2011 ). This survey study was conducted in collaboration with a social

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K. Andrew R. Richards and Kim C. Graber

of the survey questionnaire that relate to PETE program coordinators’ perceptions of retention. Specific research questions included: (a) How do the strategies that PETE coordinators view as effective compare with those they implement in practice? (b) What barriers do PETE coordinators perceive with

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Suzan F. Ayers and Amelia Mays Woods

strategies? (c) how do PETE coordinators view barriers to engagement in program recruitment? and (d) how frequently do PETE coordinators employ certain marketing strategies to advance recruitment efforts? Methods Data for this study were drawn from the survey described in Chapter 4 ( Richards, Killian

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Erika Rees-Punia, Charles E. Matthews, Ellen M. Evans, Sarah K. Keadle, Rebecca L. Anderson, Jennifer L. Gay, Michael D. Schmidt, Susan M. Gapstur and Alpa V. Patel

activity (PA) and health is based on data collected by various self-reported measures. Although self-reported measures of PA may be influenced by participant comprehension, difficulty recalling events, social desirability bias, and/or other sources of random and systematic error, surveys remain the most

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Ann C. Grandjean

A three-part questionnaire was used to identify professionals in sports nutrition and survey their recommendations on various aspects of sports nutrition. The majority of respondents were women. Over half of the sample reported working in sports nutrition for 6 years or less, and 72% indicated that 40% or less of their job is dedicated to sports nutrition. A portion of the questionnaire assessed the subjects' opinions on various sports nutrition topics. Statements on water and electrolytes generated the most agreement while statements on protein generated the least agreement. There was a positive correlation (p~0.004) between level of education and whether or not the respondents recommended glycogen loading, and a positive correlation (p~0.008) between the subjects' use of dietary supplements and the fact that they recommended supplements to the athletes they counseled. The majority of professionals in this study worked with recreational athletes and were more concerned about encouraging a healthy diet than improving athletic performance.