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Karen Hostetter

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Eric Maylia, John A. Fairclough, Leonard D.M. Nokes and Michael D. Jones

Thigh girth is often used as an indicator of muscle hypertrophy or atrophy during the rehabilitation process following knee surgery. The measurement of thigh girth, using a conventional plastic tape measure, in an attempt to detect muscle hypertrophy or atrophy may be misleading. It is an inaccurate measure of thigh muscle bulk. Although the sample size is small, the results show that measurements are heavily biased by the expectations of observers, with the result that a considerable change in thigh girth is likely to be ignored.

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Gary L. Harrelson, Deidre Leaver-Dunn, A. Louise Fincher and James D. Leeper

The purpose of this study was to examine the inter- and intratester reliability of lower extremity circumference measurements obtained by two testers using the same tape measure and two different tape measures. Twenty-one male high school student-athletes participated in this study. Two testers measured lower extremity circumference at three sites using a standard flexible tape measure and a Lufkin tape measure with a Gulick spring-loaded handle attachment. Measurement sites were medial joint line, 20 cm above medial joint line, and 15 cm below medial joint line. Intraclass correlation coefficients were computed for inter- and intratester comparisons for each measuring device and each measurement site. Results indicated high reliability but a significant difference between the two tape measures. These findings indicate that the reliability of lower extremity circumference measurements is not influenced by tester experience and that the Lufkin tape measure with the Gulick handle attachment is the more accurate of the two tape measures.

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Robert D. Catena, Nigel Campbell, Alexa L. Werner and Kendall M. Iverson

determined the accuracy of the measure. Body height was measured with a stadiometer (accurate to 1 mm). Body weight was measured with a digital scale (accurate to 0.1 kg). Widths and depths on the torso were measured with an anthropometer (accurate to 1 mm). Circumferences were measured with a clinical tape

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Eric Maylia, John A. Fairclough, Leonard D.M. Nokes and Michael D. Jones

The purpose of this study was to assess whether measurements of thigh bulk taken with a tape measure would give an indication of muscle power. Eleven male patients, all undergoing unilateral menisectomies, performed exercises of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles during concentric loading at 60°/s. The patients were tested three times over a 12-week period: one day before the operation and 2 and 12 weeks after the operation. Thigh girth was recorded, using a conventional plastic tape measure, 10 cm from the top of the patella in each of the three test sessions. The results of this study demonstrated that muscle power cannot be predicted from thigh girth measurements.

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Min-Hyeok Kang, Dong-Kyu Lee, Kyung-Hee Park and Jae-Seop Oh

Context:

Ankle-dorsiflexion range of motion has often been measured in the weight-bearing condition in the clinical setting; however, little is known about the relationship between the weight-bearing-lunge test (WBLT) and both ankle kinematics and performance on dynamic postural-control tests.

Objective:

To examine whether ankle kinematics and performance on the Lower Quarter Y-Balance Test (YBT-LQ) are correlated with results of the WBLT using an inclinometer and tape measure.

Design:

Cross-sectional.

Setting:

University motionanalysis laboratory.

Participants:

30 physically active participants.

Interventions:

None.

Main Outcome Measures:

The WBLT was evaluated using an inclinometer and a tape measure. The reach distances in the anterior, posteromedial, and posterolateral directions on the YBT-LQ were normalized by limb length. Ankle dorsiflexion during the YBT-LQ was recorded using a 3-dimensional motion-analysis system. Simple linear regression was used to examine the relationship between the WBLT results and both ankle dorsiflexion and the normalized reach distance in each direction on the YBT-LQ.

Results:

The WBLT results were significantly correlated with ankle dorsiflexion in all directions on the YBT-LQ (P < .05). A strong correlation was found between the inclinometer measurement of the WBLT and ankle dorsiflexion (r = .74, r 2 = .55), whereas the tape-measure results on the WBLT were moderately correlated with ankle dorsiflexion (r = .64, r 2 = .40) during the anterior reach on the YBT-LQ. Only the normalized anterior reach distance was significantly correlated with the results for the inclinometer (r = .68, r 2 = .46) and the tape measure (r = .64, r 2 = .41) on the WBLT.

Conclusions:

Inclinometer measurements on the WBLT can be an appropriate tool for predicting the amount of ankle dorsiflexion during the YBT-LQ. Furthermore, WBLT should be measured in those who demonstrate poor dynamic balance.

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Susan L. Whitney, Larry Mattocks, James J. Irrgang, Pamela A. Gentile, David Pezzullo and Abdulazeem Kamkar

The purpose of this two-part study was to determine if lower extremity girth measurements are repeatable. Sixteen males and 14 females participated in the intra- and intertester reliability portion of this study. Girth was assessed at five different lower extremity sites by two physical therapists using a standard tape measure. Thirty measures (15 by each examiner) were collected on the subject's right leg, and a mean of the three measures was used in the analysis. The measurements were repeated 7 days later. It was found that by using a simple standardized procedure, girth measurements in the clinic can be highly repeatable in experienced clinicians. Part 2 of the study involved testing the right and left legs of 22 subjects to determine if girth of the right and left legs was similar. All subjects had their girth assessed at five sites on their right and left legs during one session. It was found that girth measures on the right and left lower extremities are comparable. In an acutely injured lower extremity, it might be assumed that the girth of both lower extremities is similar.

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Ryan McCann, Kyle Kosik, Masafumi Terada and Phillip Gribble

measurements to assess edema accumulation. 22 The examiner placed the patient’s ankle in neutral dorsiflexion and instructed the participant to maintain that position. The examiner then wrapped a tape measure around the ankle, beginning midway between the tibialis anterior tendon and the lateral malleolus

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Berkiye Kirmizigil, Jeffry Roy Chauchat, Omer Yalciner, Gozde Iyigun, Ender Angin and Gul Baltaci

. Chronological and training ages were asked. Body height was measured with a tape measure. Body weight was measured by a scale. Body mass index was calculated by using the following formula: weight (kg)/height (m) 2 . Perceived Soreness A visual analog scale ranging from 0 (“no pain”) to 10 (“unbearable

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Paul J. Read, Jon L. Oliver, Gregory D. Myer, Mark B.A. De Ste Croix and Rhodri S. Lloyd

this specified direction ( 31 ) and the practicalities of performing a range of tests in a time-efficient manner using a large sample of players. Single-Leg Hop for Distance Hop distances were recorded using a tape measure that was taped to the floor and marked out for a length of 3 m. Participants