Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 486 items for :

Clear All
Restricted access

Zeynep Hazar Kanik, Seyit Citaker, Canan Yilmaz Demirtas, Neslihan Celik Bukan, Bulent Celik and Gurkan Gunaydin

interventions have previously been examined in an attempt to alleviate the associated side effects of this type of exercise. 2 , 5 , 6 However, there is still no gold standard treatment for DOMS. Kinesio taping (KT) for lymphatic drainage is an alternative intervention for the treatment of DOMS. According to

Restricted access

Erika Hunt and Sandra Short

Objective:

To study athletes perceptions of adhesive ankle taping.

Design:

A qualitative study where athletes were interviewed regarding adhesive ankle taping.

Setting:

The University of North Dakota in Grand Forks, ND, USA.

Participants:

Eleven collegiate athletes, all currently taping their ankles, representative of three groups: recent injury, past injury, and no prior injury.

Results:

Taping resulted in feelings of increased confidence, increased strength, and decreased anxiety for injury or reinjury. Differences were found in responses given by the participants in the three groups.

Conclusions:

Taping has a psychological impact on athletes. Athletic trainers should make sure they educate athletes about the uses and functions of adhesive tape.

Restricted access

Che-Hsiu Chen, Tsun-Shun Huang, Huei-Ming Chai, Mei-Hwa Jan and Jiu-Jenq Lin

Context:

Recent studies have shown that the static stretch (SS) may adversely affect leg-muscle performance.

Objectives:

The authors examined the short-term effects of 2 stretching exercises on hamstrings muscle before and after exercise.

Design:

Crossover.

Setting:

Laboratory.

Participants:

9 healthy, physically active men.

Interventions:

There were 3 protocols in a randomized order with a 7-d interval: nonstretching (CON protocol), hamstrings static stretching (SS) with proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF), and SS with kinesio-taping application on the hamstrings.

Main Outcome Measures:

Outcome measures included first-felt and maximum tolerant-felt range of motion (FROM and TROM), maximal knee-flexion peak torque (PT) at 180°/s, and hamstrings muscle stiffness.

Results:

Groups were not different at prestretching in terms of hamstrings flexibility, PT, and muscle stiffness. At poststretching, both stretching protocols showed significant increases in FROM and TROM (P < .05). Stiffer hamstrings muscle and decreased PT were found in both SS+PNF and CON protocols (P < .05). However, there was no significant difference in the SS+Taping protocol (P > .05).

Conclusion:

The stretching protocols improve hamstrings flexibility immediately, but after exercise hamstrings peak torque is diminished in the SS+PNF but not in the SS+Taping group. This means that SS+Taping can prevent negative results from exercise, which may prevent muscle injury.

Restricted access

Marjan Someeh, Ali Asghar Norasteh, Hassan Daneshmandi and Abbas Asadi

Context:

Ankle sprains or chronic ankle instability (CAI) is common in athletes and a common method for decreasing the effects of ankle instable is using tape.

Objective:

To determine whether Mulligan ankle taping (MAT) influenced the functional performance (FP) tests in athletes with and without CAI.

Design:

A cross-sectional study using a within-subject experimental design between four ankle conditions (taped and untaped, athletes with and without CAI).

Setting:

Research laboratory.

Participants:

Sixteen professional athletes with unilateral CAI (10 men and 6 women; age 23.2 ± 3 years, height 175.4 ± 10.3 cm, weight 73 ± 14.5 kg, and body mass index 23.8 ± 3.6%) and 16 uninjured professional athletes (10 men and 6 women; age 22.8 ± 1.7 years, height 173.6 ± 12.2 cm, weight 66.4 ± 11.4 kg, and body mass index 22.2 ± 3.3%) volunteered to participant in this study.

Intervention:

Mulligan ankle taping.

Main Outcome Measures:

FP tests including single leg hopping course, Figure-of-8 hop and side hop were measured for both the groups in two conditions: taped and untaped.

Results:

There were significant differences between injured and uninjured athletes in all FP tests (P < .05). MAT significantly improved FP tests in both groups (P < .05).

Conclusion:

We found that MAT can improve FP tests in athletes with CAI and uninjured athletes. Therefore, it seems that MAT can be an effective method for enhancing athletes’ performance in sports that require lateral movements.

Restricted access

Neslihan Duruturk, Nihan Ozunlu Pekyavas, Atakan Yρlmaz and Metin Karatas

Objective:

Aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacities are important components of athletic performance. The use of Kinesio Taping® (KT) as a supplementary treatment in athletic settings has increased in the recent years. KT can facilitate muscle contraction, which may be useful for improving performance. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the application of KT to the quadriceps muscle has any effect on anaerobic and aerobic performance in young healthy individuals.

Design:

Randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical study.

Setting:

Baskent University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation.

Patients:

Thirty-two healthy male participants were randomly assigned to either the KT group or a sham KT (SKT) group.

Interventions:

The KT muscle facilitation technique was applied to the quadriceps muscle bilaterally and measurements were taken 45 min later to ensure full adhesion.

Main Outcome Measures:

The Wingate cycle ergometer test was used to assess peak anaerobic power (peak AnP, in Watts) and exercise capacity (Watt/kg), while the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) was used to assess aerobic exercise capacity of the participants. Comparisons between groups were performed using the nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test, while those between baseline and posttaping used the nonparametric Wilcoxon test.

Results:

No significant difference was found between the two groups in the aerobic or anaerobic test parameters (p > .05). Within the groups, a significant improvement in time factors in peak AnP (929.7 2 ± 184.37 W to 1043.49 ± 224.42 W) was found only in the KT group (p = .028) and no other parameter was significantly different (p > .05).

Conclusions:

KT applied to the quadriceps muscle can positively improve anaerobic exercise performance and athletic performance capacity. However, KT did not affect aerobic capacity. Further research is needed to show that KT can improve and support anaerobic and aerobic exercise capacity in healthy participants or athletes.

Restricted access

Dorianne Schuitema, Christian Greve, Klaas Postema, Rienk Dekker and Juha M. Hijmans

such as taping, rocker shoes, and (ankle-)foot orthoses ([A]FOs) including night splints. 11 Mechanical treatments are promising due to the low risk of complications, good accessibility, and high capacity to relieve the mechanical load on the plantar fascia during functional tasks of daily life. The

Restricted access

Rumit S. Kakar, Hilary B. Greenberger and Patrick O. McKeon

of anterior knee pain has long been thought to be due to increased patellofemoral joint forces as a result of biomechanical changes to the alignment of the patella as it sits in the trochlear groove. 5 , 7 , 8 As a corrective intervention, patellar taping is often incorporated into treatment

Restricted access

Feng-Hua Tsai, I-Hua Chu, Chun-Hao Huang, Jing-Min Liang, Jia-Hroung Wu and Wen-Lan Wu

supports and taping are permitted for medical reasons, if they are tidy and not hazardous to the opponent. There is a vast array of different taping methods that can be used for problems with different anatomical locations. The exact application of each technique may be different, depending on the

Restricted access

Katie J. Lyman, Michael McCrone, Thomas A. Hanson, Christopher D. Mellinger and Kara Gange

of cryotherapy are duration of treatment, amount of adipose tissue, anatomical location, and modality employed. 2 In addition, a barrier between the ice and skin, such as a cast, splint, or tape, may require longer treatment applications to achieve any therapeutic benefits. 18 – 21 Consequently

Restricted access

Jason Cline, Abbey Thomas Fenwick, Tricia Turner, Susan Arthur and Erik A. Wikstrom

Maintaining balance is critical for daily life and sport and worse postural control is linked with an increased risk of recurrent ankle injury. 9 , 10 A wide range of therapeutic interventions are used to treat lateral ankle sprains and CAI. External supports (e.g., taping and bracing) 11 , 12 and balance