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Marcia Matanin and Connie Collier

The purpose of this study was to explore and describe three preservice teachers’ beliefs as they evolved throughout a 4-year teacher preparation program. Data collection spanned 5 years and included formal interviews, open-ended questionnaires, and document analysis of reflective writings. The results indicated that participants assimilated program messages into their beliefs about teaching physical education relative to elementary content, teaching effectiveness, and the importance of planning. Participants were less likely to assimilate program messages about classroom management and the purpose of physical education due to the impact of their own biographies. Participants were in favor of emphasizing effort and participation and rejected the program philosophy on assessment of student learning. Data suggest that participants’ K–12 school experiences as well as their lived experiences play a powerful role in the formation of their beliefs about teaching physical education.

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Paul G. Schempp

This study determined changes in physical education student teachers’ beliefs (perceptions) of control over student learning. A pre-post student teaching design was used to detect changes in beliefs of 44 volunteer physical education student teachers. Beliefs in control over learning outcomes were measured by the Teacher Locus of Control scale. Pretesting was completed 5 weeks prior to teaching, and posttesting was administered at the completion of the 10-week student teaching experience. Data were gathered over a 2-year period. Data analyzed via a paired t-test indicated the student teachers’ belief of responsibility for student learning was decreased. Specifically, total responsibility for student outcomes and responsibility for student failure showed significant p < .05) decreases. No change in beliefs regarding control over student success was detected. A multiple regression analysis revealed significant p < .05) gender differences on the postteaching composite score. It appeared that males showed a significantly greater overall decrease in perceptions of beliefs of control over student learning.

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Nathalie Aelterman, Maarten Vansteenkiste, Lynn Van den Berghe, Jotie De Meyer and Leen Haerens

The present intervention study examined whether physical education (PE) teachers can learn to make use of autonomy-supportive and structuring teaching strategies. In a sample of 39 teachers (31 men, M = 38.51 ± 10.44 years) and 669 students (424 boys, M = 14.58 ± 1.92 years), we investigated whether a professional development training grounded in self-determination theory led to changes in (a) teachers’ beliefs about the effectiveness and feasibility of autonomy-supportive and structuring strategies and (b) teachers’ in-class reliance on these strategies, as rated by teachers, external observers, and students. The intervention led to positive changes in teachers’ beliefs regarding both autonomy support and structure. As for teachers’ actual teaching behavior, the intervention was successful in increasing autonomy support according to students and external observers, while resulting in positive changes in teacher-reported structure. Implications for professional development and recommendations for future research are discussed.

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Ping Xiang, Susan Lowy and Ron McBride

The present study focused on preservice classroom teachers’ beliefs about elementary physical education and the impact of a field-based elementary physical education methods course on their beliefs. Participants (N = 97) completed questionnaires at the beginning and at the end of the course. Results indicated that the preservice classroom teachers held similar beliefs about the values and purposes of elementary physical education as were shared by physical education professionals. The methods course had a positive impact on the participants’ beliefs but no impact on their disposition toward teaching elementary physical education. Teaching physical education in an elementary school setting and observing physical education classes were the two most important components of the course that contributed to changes in the participants’ beliefs.

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Déirdre Ní Chróinín and Mary O’Sullivan

This longitudinal research explored beginning elementary classroom teachers’ beliefs about learning to teach physical education (PE) across time. Understanding how beliefs shape the process of learning to teach PE can inform the design of more impactful physical education teacher education (PETE). We mapped beliefs over six years including the three years of an undergraduate elementary teacher education program and the first three years teaching in schools through reflective writing tasks and semistructured interviews. Across time these beginning teachers believed that learning to teach PE required active participation in PE content, building of a resource bank of content ideas, and practice of teaching the content. Building competence in PE content through active participation combined with development of more complex understandings of PE content through PETE pedagogies can better support elementary teachers learning to teach PE.

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Pamela Hodges Kulinna, Stephen Silverman and Xiaofen Deng Keating

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between teachers’ belief systems toward physical activity and fitness and what is taught in their classes. Forty-two physical education teachers were selected based on high physical activity and fitness or low physical activity and fitness belief system scores on a previously validated instrument. Each teacher was observed twice to measure instructional behaviors related to physical activity and fitness. The relationship between their belief systems and actions was determined. There were no significant differences between the high physical activity and fitness belief system and low physical activity and fitness belief system groups in the percent of class time spent in moderate to vigorous physical activity, fitness activities, or teacher behaviors related to fitness.

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Laura Prior and Matthew Curtner-Smith

the effects of socialization on teachersbeliefs and values and subsequent curriculum design is dated, has been incidental, and carried out in the secondary setting. Comparatively, little research had been conducted in the elementary setting, and, to our knowledge, there is no published work

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Risto Marttinen, Dillon Landi, Ray N. Fredrick III and Stephen Silverman

successfully into their teaching may be ill conceived” ( McCaughtry et al., 2008 , p. 85). Rather, teachers want to have a say in what happens in their gymnasia. Put quite directly, “Teacher beliefs play a critical role in technology integration. Whether beliefs guide actions or actions inform beliefs

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Michalis Stylianou, Pamela Hodges Kulinna, Donetta Cothran and Ja Youn Kwon

This study was informed by the literature on teaching metaphors and the theory of occupational socialization. Its purpose was to examine in-service Physical Education teachers’ initial (before entering the profession), current, and ideal metaphors of teaching, related factors, and potential differences in participants’ metaphors based on their teaching experience. A mixed-methods approach was employed for this study, including a modified version of an existing survey (N = 66; Alger, 2009) and interviews (N = 13). Descriptive statistics indicated that while participants predominantly embraced teacher-centered metaphors initially, about half of them reported their current and ideal metaphors as student-centered. Constant comparison and analytic induction techniques revealed three themes and several subthemes: (a) fluidity (own definitions, combination of metaphors), (b) formation of initial views of teaching (acculturation, professional socialization), and (c) evolutionary forces and constraints (experience, pressure of test scores, time allocation, resources). These results have implications both for preservice and in-service teacher education programs.

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Sarah A. Doolittle, Paul B. Rukavina, Weidong Li, Mara Manson and Angela Beale

Using the Social Ecological Constraints model, a qualitative multiple case study design was used to explore experienced and committed middle school physical education teachers’ perspectives on overweight and obese students (OWS), and how and why they acted to include OWS in physical education and physical activity opportunities in their school environments. Three themes emerged. 1) OWS are “the same, but different.” Teachers attempted to treat all students the same, but perceived variations among OWS’ participation in PE and related individual constraints. 2) Teachers’ concerns lead to individual goals and specific actions. Teachers identified specific goals and approaches to help individual OWS who needed extra attention. 3) OWS are a responsibility and challenge. Many of these teachers felt a responsibility to devote extra time and effort to help struggling OWS to succeed. These teachers avoided obesity bias, and exhibited beliefs and actions similar to a caring perspective.