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Elizabeth Domangue and Russell Lee Carson

Following the devastation of hurricane Katrina, a university located in the south-eastern United States created a service-learning program. This program was established so that physical education teacher education (PETE) students could provide physical activities to children living in a temporary, government-funded housing community. The purpose of this study was to investigate how the service-learning program shaped preservice teachers’ cultural competency. The participants were 16 PETE students in a curriculum development course. A questionnaire was used to assess changes in the students’ cultural competency. Reflective journals and interviews were qualitative data sources used to identify significant elements of the service-learning program that elicited thoughts about the role of cultural competency in teaching. Findings revealed that there were changes in cultural competency. Triangulation of the data suggested that the service-learning participants identified consistent engagement, exposure to another culture, and an engaged instructor as key contributors to cultural competency within the service-learning program.

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Wesley J. Wilson and K. Andrew R. Richards

in PE ( Curtner-Smith, 2017 ; Curtner-Smith, Hastie, & Kinchin, 2008 ), the structure and function of physical education teacher education (PETE) programs ( Stran & Curtner-Smith, 2009 ), and ongoing socialization in the sociopolitical environments of schools that have historically marginalized the

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Ja Youn Kwon, Pamela H. Kulinna, Hans van der Mars, Audrey Amrein-Beardsley and Mirka Koro-Ljungberg

CSPAPs. To do this, Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) programs will need to prepare future physical education teachers differently. PETE Programs PETE programs play a substantial role in preparing preservice physical education teachers with a strong background in content knowledge, pedagogical

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Fatih Dervent, Phillip Ward, Erhan Devrilmez and Emi Tsuda

that is unknown about the use of instructional tasks. In particular, little is known about how teachers acquire SCK either in physical education teacher education (PETE) programs or in the practice of teaching. There is also little known about how teachers incorporate tasks into their teaching and the

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Jenn M. Jacobs, K. Andrew R. Richards, Zach Wahl-Alexander and James D. Ressler

Guided by the Society of Health and Physical Educators America ( 2017 ) standards for initial licensure, physical education teacher education (PETE) programs are tasked with preparing preservice teachers (PTs) with the knowledge and skills needed to teach effectively ( Graber, Killian, & Woods

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Hal A. Lawson

The following analysis is one-sided and selective. It is an attempt to derive guidelines for the design of teacher education programs from recent work on the occupational socialization of physical educationists. The work cited is limited almost exclusively to that completed by the author and his former students. This can be justified insofar as this analysis doubles as a benchmark for an additive and integrative research program, indicating which questions need to be asked next and signalling the practical significance of past work. The discussion begins with a definitional treatment of occupational socialization prior to identifying guidelines for teacher education programs.

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K. Andrew R. Richards and Kim C. Graber

As illustrated in Chapter 5 ( Ayers & Woods, 2019 ) and Chapter 6 ( Kern, Richards, Ayers, & Killian, 2019 ) of this monograph, physical education teacher education (PETE) faculty members recognize the need to recruit PETE students into their programs. Once that recruitment has taken place, however

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Hal A. Lawson

I offer a critique of Richard Tinning’s analysis of dominant discourses, problem setting, and teacher education pedagogies. I begin by capsulizing his argument. Then I amend his definition of discourse. Next, I take issue with the way he connects discourses to the process of problem setting. After suggesting new avenues for research on problem setting, I disagree with Tinning’s problem setting, raising questions about his categorizations, assumptions, and silences. Finally, I agree with Tinning’s call for alternative pedagogies. After indicating that he has not provided all of the information and assistance we require, I conclude by requesting a practice-centered orientation in future papers.

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Hal A. Lawson

Conceptual and methodological limitations are evident in the previous research on physical education teacher education (PETE) professors. The developing literature on professors in all fields, career theory, and occupational socialization theory may be blended to build a conceptual framework for future research. This framework illuminates influences on and questions about PETE professors’ work lives, role orientations, productivity, and affiliations. It also invites autobiographical, developmental, longitudinal, and action-oriented research perspectives. Several benefits may be derived from research on PETE professors, including improved career-guidance and faculty-development systems.

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Kate Hovey, Diana Niland and John T. Foley

populations, one of the areas that is lacking is the self-efficacy of physical education teacher education (PETE) students to teach outdoor education (OE) skills and concepts. As self-efficacy, and more specifically teacher self-efficacy, is defined as a teacher’s perception of how well they can teach a