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Jeralyn J. Plack and Carol A. French

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Ja Youn Kwon, Pamela H. Kulinna, Hans van der Mars, Audrey Amrein-Beardsley and Mirka Koro-Ljungberg

of physical education are advocates for CSPAP in schools, teachers who actually implement CSPAP in schools, need to be adequately prepared and assessed for it. The role of PETE programs should evolve to embrace this expanded role of physical education teachers as well as the role of teacher

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Andrea R. Taliaferro, Lindsay Hammond and Kristi Wyant

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of completion of an adapted physical education (APE) course with an associated on-campus practicum on preservice physical educators’ self-efficacy beliefs toward the inclusion of individuals with specific disabilities (autism, intellectual disabilities, physical disabilities, and visual impairments). Preservice students in physical education teacher education (N = 98) at a large U.S. Midwestern university enrolled in 1 of 2 separate 15-wk APE courses with an associated 9-wk practicum experience were surveyed at the beginning, middle, and conclusion of each course. Results of 4 separate 2-factor fixed-effect split-plot ANOVAs revealed significant improvements in self-efficacy beliefs from Wk 1 to Wk 8 and from Wk 1 to Wk 15 across all disability categories. Significant differences between courses were found only for autism in Time 1.

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Timothy A. Brusseau, Sean M. Bulger, Eloise Elliott, James C. Hannon and Emily Jones

This paper discusses lessons learned from the process of conducting community-based research with a focus on issues and topics of potential importance to leaders of departments of kinesiology. This paper is written from the perspective of physical education teacher education faculty implementing comprehensive school physical activity programming. Specifically, the paper focuses on the intersection of physical education and public health, the reconceptualization of training physical education teachers, related opportunities for community-engaged learning, and the process of relationship building in schools and communities. It is the authors’ intent that this paper will stimulate discussions relative to these topics among leaders of and faculty within kinesiology departments.

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Margaret Stran and Matthew Curtner-Smith

The purpose of this study was to (a) examine how two preservice teachers (PTs) interpreted and delivered the sport education (SE) model during their student teaching and (b) discover factors that led to the their interpreting and delivering the model in the ways they did. The theoretical framework used to guide data collection and analysis was occupational socialization. Data were collected using a variety of qualitative techniques and analyzed using standard interpretive methods. Results revealed that high quality SE-Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) facilitated both a commitment to the model and the ability to teach the full version of it for a teaching-oriented and moderately coaching-oriented PT. Key elements of SE-PETE responsible for this commitment and competence appeared to be the teaching of prescribed mini-seasons before student teaching, the conditions encountered by PTs during teaching practice, and a host of PETE faculty characteristics congruent with the general PETE occupational socialization literature.

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Donna L. Goodwin and Brenda Rossow-Kimball

There has been little critical exploration of the ethical issues that arise in professional practice common to adapted physical activity. We cannot avoid moral issues as we inevitably will act in ways that will negatively affect the well-being of others. We will make choices, which in our efforts to support others, may hurt by violating dignity or infringing on rights. The aim of this paper is to open a dialogue on what constitutes ethical practice in adapted physical activity. Ethical theories including principlism, virtue ethics, ethics of care, and relational ethics provide a platform for addressing questions of right and good and wrong and bad in the field of adapted physical activity. Unpacking of stories of professional practice (including sacred, secret, and cover stories) against the lived experiences of persons experiencing disability will create a knowledge landscape in adapted physical activity that is sensitive to ethical reflection.

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Phillip Ward

Teacher preparation programs can be situated in the middle of a teacher pipeline, the purpose of which is to provide competent and qualified physical educators to teach in our nation’s schools (see Figure  1 ). At the exit end of the pipeline, jobs for physical education teachers are plentiful

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Patricia I. Hogan

A prominent theme of educational reform involves focusing on developing students’ thinking abilities. This theme is germane to improving the quality of teacher preparation programs in all subject areas including adapted physical education (APE). Perhaps schools of education in general and APE teacher preparation programs in particular can learn from some progressive and prominent medical schools regarding the development of curricula, programs, and experiences to improve quality of personnel. These medical schools have introduced a conceptually significant innovation—the problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. It is the purpose of this article to introduce the concept of PBL as a potential model for graduate level personnel preparation in APE.