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Desmond McEwan, Bruno D. Zumbo, Mark A. Eys and Mark R. Beauchamp

Teamwork is often noted as an important variable within the vernacular of sport. Coaches frequently emphasize the importance of players working together, with athletes similarly attributing team outcomes to the extent to which they work well with their teammates. Despite this seeming importance of

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Dustin A. Hahn, Matthew S. VanDyke and R. Glenn Cummins

fantasy sport audiences for quite some time ( Tedesco, 1997 ). Likewise, advances in technology employed in the production of sport broadcasts have altered the onscreen presentation of sports to include information about individual players, teams, scores, and more via on-screen graphics ( Nachman

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Sadjad Soltanzadeh and Mitchell Mooney

( Gianni, D’Ambrogio, & Tolk, 2014 ; Sage & Armstrong 2000 ), physics ( Makarov 2014 ), science and technology studies ( Latour, 1992 ), and in modelling and evaluating team performance and injury management in sport ( Hulme & Finch 2015 ; Mooney, Charlton, Soltanzadeh, & Drew, 2017 ; Soltanzadeh

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John Harris and Mark Lyberger

The Ryder Cup is undoubtedly the biggest and most prestigious team competition in golf but has received little attention from scholars with an interest in sport communication. This commentary examines print- and electronic-media accounts of the 2006 event and looks at how the Ryder Cup is used to (re)present images of the U.S. nation. The analysis highlights how the defeat was positioned within a broader narrative of a supposed “crisis” in U.S. sport and was also linked to a discourse of larger cultural decline.

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Cornelia Frank, Gian-Luca Linstromberg, Linda Hennig, Thomas Heinen and Thomas Schack

Success in team sports heavily depends on individuals acting together in a coordinated fashion toward a common goal (for reviews, see Araújo & Bourbousson, 2016 ; Eccles & Tenenbaum, 2004 ; Eccles, & Tran Turner, 2014 ; Schmidt, Fitzpatrick, Caron, & Mergeche, 2011 ; Sebanz, Bekkering

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Levi Heimans, Wouter R. Dijkshoorn, Marco J.M. Hoozemans and Jos J. de Koning

value of drafting is explicitly addressed during a team pursuit in track cycling. In this Olympic discipline, 4 cyclists try to cover a distance of 4000 m together, as fast as possible. The team members benefit from each other by means of rotations of the first cyclist to the fourth position every 250 m

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Patrick Ward, Aaron J. Coutts, Ricard Pruna and Alan McCall

and the team as a collective. The gold standard is likely to follow an evidence-led approach 1 , 2 using the integration of coaching expertise, athlete values, and the best relevant research evidence into the decision-making process for the day-to-day service delivery to players. 2 The aim of this

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Henry Wear and Bob Heere

, 2008 ; Gladden & Funk, 2002 ; Kunkel, Funk, & King, 2014 ; Ross, 2006 , 2007 ), we still know little of how marketers can develop a new brand ( Grant, Heere, & Dickson, 2011 ; Kunkel, Doyle, Funk, Du, & McDonald, 2016 ). The study of new sport teams has received increasing focus in the sport

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Frazer Atkinson, Sandra E. Short and Jeffrey Martin

In sport psychology research, efficacy beliefs are considered critical psychological factors that influence performance ( Feltz, Short, & Sullivan, 2008 ). In the current study, the relationship between athletes’ perceptions of their coaches’ efficacy and perceptions of their team’s efficacy were

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Samuel T. Forlenza, Scott Pierce, Robin S. Vealey and John Mackersie

this study, therefore, was to identify specific actions that coaches can do to build confidence in their athletes and teams from the perspective of athletes themselves. Much of the confidence research in the sport psychology field stems from Bandura’s ( 1997 ) notion of self-efficacy beliefs, which