Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 134 items for :

  • "team identification" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Nicolas Pontes, Vivian Pontes, Hyun Seung Jin, and Chris Mahar

), most have studied only one type of articulation ( Grohs et al., 2004 ; Kim et al., 2015 ; Quester & Thompson, 2001 ); and, surprisingly, none of these studies have examined how sport fans with different levels of team identification process the various types of articulation messages. Addressing this

Restricted access

Yonghwan Chang, Daniel L. Wann, and Yuhei Inoue

’ identification with a specific team or team identification (team ID). In other words, those who have a stronger team ID (i.e., individuals perceive themselves as fans of the team and view the team as a representation of themselves; Branscombe & Wann, 1992 ) are more likely to experience the state of being in

Restricted access

Wonseok Jang, Yong Jae Ko, Daniel L. Wann, and Daehwan Kim

level of team identification, and the amount of energy that spectators gain is expected to determine their levels of happiness. Furthermore, this study proposed that the effect of team identification on spectators’ happiness would be moderated by game outcome (winning vs. losing). Specifically, we

Restricted access

Ben Larkin and Janet S. Fink

Team identification—loosely defined as a psychological connection to a sport team ( Wann, 2006 )—has been covered extensively in sport management literature. For example, a wealth of research has been put into understanding both the outcomes of team identification (e.g.,  Branscombe & Wann, 1992

Restricted access

Elizabeth B. Delia, Jeffrey D. James, and Daniel L. Wann

Scholars have increasingly studied consumers’ identification with a sport team alongside well-being. The primary aim of this research is to understand how team identification may impact consumers’ lives ( Doyle, Filo, Lock, Funk, & McDonald, 2016 ; Inoue, Berg, & Chelladurai, 2015 ). Through

Restricted access

Dae Hee Kwak and Sean Pradhan

the theories of compensatory consumption and identity threat, we hypothesized that different advertisements and individuals’ level of team identification would impact their evaluations of the advertiser. Team Identification and Identity Threat Social identity theory provides a useful theoretical

Restricted access

Elizabeth B. Delia

identification often translate into positive behavioral outcomes for sport entities themselves ( Lock & Heere, 2017 ). Despite the benefits of team identification for fans and the sport entities they identify with, there are also negative consequences of team identification. Negative consequences of team

Restricted access

Yonghwan Chang, Vicki Schull, and Lisa A. Kihl

secure their self-esteem and social acceptance through the recognition and mental negotiation of their multifaceted social characteristics. The activation of implicit team identification Among numerous types of social identity, the concept of team identification (team ID) has evolved in the sport

Restricted access

Ted Hayduk III, Natasha Brison, and Joris Drayer

’ perceptions of, and behavioral intentions related to, ticketing platforms. In concert, the aim of this analysis is to investigate the moderating roles of Team Identification (ID) and Sport Fandom . To do so, the analysis conducts and analyzes data from an online experiment involving N  = 403 sport

Restricted access

Harry H. Kwon, Galen Trail, and Jeffrey D. James

The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential mediating effect of perceived value in the relationship between team identification and intent to purchase collegiate team-licensed apparel. Direct effect, partially mediated, and fully mediated models were compared. The respondents were students (N = 110) attending a large university in the southeastern United States. Participants first completed the Team Identification Scale and then viewed a slide depicting an article of licensed merchandise (t-shirt). Participants next completed the Perceived Value and Purchase Intention Scales. Goodness-of-fit statistics indicated that the direct effect model did not fit the data. The partially mediated and the fully mediated models fit equally well; the latter was more parsimonious and thus was chosen for further analysis. Team identification explained 13.2% of the variance in perceived value; perceived value explained 42.6% of the variance in purchase intentions. The findings indicate that team identification alone did not drive the purchase intentions in this study; it is important to take into account the perceived value of the team-licensed merchandise.