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Joachim Hüffmeier, Joyce Elena Schleu and Christoph Nohe

Whether people work harder in teams compared with individually (i.e., effort gains in teams) is among the oldest research questions in psychology as a whole and, specifically, in sports and social psychology (e.g.,  Köhler, 1926 ; Moede, 1914 ). 1 To find out whether and under which conditions

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Mitesh S. Patel, David A. Asch, Roy Rosin, Dylan S. Small, Scarlett L. Bellamy, Karen Hoffer, David Shuttleworth, Victoria Hilbert, Jingsan Zhu, Lin Yang, Xingmei Wang and Kevin G. Volpp

 al 12 conducted a randomized trial among college students to compare social comparison versus social support. They found that social comparison was more effective at increasing physical activity but that its impact was not affected by individual or team incentives. However, these incentives were

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Luc J. Martin, Jessi Wilson, M. Blair Evans and Kevin S. Spink

Although cliques are often referenced in sporting circles, they have received little attention in the group dynamics literature. This is surprising given their potential influence on group-related processes that could ultimately influence team functioning (e.g., Carron & Eys, 2012). The present study examined competitive athletes’ perceptions of cliques using semistructured interviews with 18 (nine female, nine male) intercollegiate athletes (Mage = 20.9, SD = 1.6) from nine sport teams. Athletes described the formation of cliques as an inevitable and variable process that was influenced by a number of antecedents (e.g., age/tenure, proximity, similarity) and ultimately shaped individual and group outcomes such as isolation, performance, and sport adherence. Further, athletes described positive consequences that emerged when existing cliques exhibited more inclusive behaviors and advanced some areas of focus for the management of cliques within sport teams. Results are discussed from both theoretical and practical perspectives.

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Mark W. Bruner, Mark Eys, Jeremie M. Carreau, Colin McLaren and Rachel Van Woezik

foundation of knowledge documenting the personal and team outcomes associated with athletes engaged in task-cohesive and socially cohesive groups (see Eys & Brawley, 2018 , for a review). Given the considerable benefits of this emergent group property, examining how to effectively enhance cohesion in teams

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Sadjad Soltanzadeh and Mitchell Mooney

( Gianni, D’Ambrogio, & Tolk, 2014 ; Sage & Armstrong 2000 ), physics ( Makarov 2014 ), science and technology studies ( Latour, 1992 ), and in modelling and evaluating team performance and injury management in sport ( Hulme & Finch 2015 ; Mooney, Charlton, Soltanzadeh, & Drew, 2017 ; Soltanzadeh

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Cornelia Frank, Gian-Luca Linstromberg, Linda Hennig, Thomas Heinen and Thomas Schack

Success in team sports heavily depends on individuals acting together in a coordinated fashion toward a common goal (for reviews, see Araújo & Bourbousson, 2016 ; Eccles & Tenenbaum, 2004 ; Eccles, & Tran Turner, 2014 ; Schmidt, Fitzpatrick, Caron, & Mergeche, 2011 ; Sebanz, Bekkering

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Levi Heimans, Wouter R. Dijkshoorn, Marco J.M. Hoozemans and Jos J. de Koning

value of drafting is explicitly addressed during a team pursuit in track cycling. In this Olympic discipline, 4 cyclists try to cover a distance of 4000 m together, as fast as possible. The team members benefit from each other by means of rotations of the first cyclist to the fourth position every 250 m

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Henry Wear and Bob Heere

, 2008 ; Gladden & Funk, 2002 ; Kunkel, Funk, & King, 2014 ; Ross, 2006 , 2007 ), we still know little of how marketers can develop a new brand ( Grant, Heere, & Dickson, 2011 ; Kunkel, Doyle, Funk, Du, & McDonald, 2016 ). The study of new sport teams has received increasing focus in the sport

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Patrick Ward, Aaron J. Coutts, Ricard Pruna and Alan McCall

and the team as a collective. The gold standard is likely to follow an evidence-led approach 1 , 2 using the integration of coaching expertise, athlete values, and the best relevant research evidence into the decision-making process for the day-to-day service delivery to players. 2 The aim of this

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Colin D. McLaren and Kevin S. Spink

Although performance has been a focus of group-dynamics research (e.g.,  Lewin, 1936 ), there is a limited knowledge base examining social structures differentiating teams that are more or less successful in achieving optimal performance. Balkundi and Harrison ( 2006 ) suggest that one of the ways