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Barıs Seven, Gamze Cobanoglu, Deran Oskay and Nevin Atalay-Guzel

changeable velocities and can be used for measurement of agonist–antagonist strength. 8 In literature, there are some studies that have used isokinetic dynamometers for wrist strength measurement. 9 – 11 However, the number of the studies regarding test–retest reliability of isokinetic dynamometer is

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Antonio Dello Iacono, Stephanie Valentin, Mark Sanderson and Israel Halperin

a strain gauge. This test does not depend on a force plate, can be easily administered without a complex setup, and assesses the horizontal forces component. Our aims were to examine the test–retest reliability of the IHPT PF outputs across 2 days and establish criterion validity by comparing the

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Brendan T. O’Keeffe, Alan E. Donnelly and Ciaran MacDonncha

analyzed on the log-transformed scale ( 7 ). The test–retest reliability of measures taken on both groups was explored using relative and absolute indices, and the results were then compared. Paired samples t tests (Wilcoxon signed-rank tests for nonparametric data) were used to determine systematic bias

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Gemma N. Parry, Lee C. Herrington and Ian G. Horsley

the reliability of CMPU as a testing protocol for upper-limb performance. The aim of this study, therefore, was to investigate the test–retest reliability of force plate–derived measures of CMPU in active males. A secondary aim was to explore the SDD that occurred between trials for meaningful changes

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Byron L. Zamboanga, Nathan T. Kearns, Janine V. Olthuis, Heidemarie Blumenthal and Renee M. Cloutier

key properties, such as test-retest reliability, have yet to be addressed. A preliminary test of the prospective stability of the recently established 7-factors/motives was thus the first aim of the current study. Elevated alcohol consumption is prevalent during emerging adulthood ( Andrews & Westling

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Ann Forsyth, J. Michael Oakes and Kathryn H. Schmitz

Background:

The Twin Cities Walking Study measured the associations of built environment versus socioeconomic and psychosocial variables with total physical activity and walking for 716 adults.

Methods:

This article reports on the test–retest reliability of the survey portion of the study. To test the reliability of the study measures, 158 respondents completed measures twice within 1 to 4 weeks. Agreement between participants’ responses was measured using Pearson r and Spearman rho, and kappa statistics.

Results:

Demographic questions are highly reliable (R > .8). Questions about environmental and social features are typically less reliable (rho range = 0.42– 0.91). Reliability of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (last 7 days version) was low (rho = 0.15 for total activity).

Conclusions:

Much of the survey has acceptable-to-good reliability. The low test–retest reliability points to potential limitations of using a single administration of the IPAQ to characterize habitual physical activity. Implications for sound inference are accordingly complicated.

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Michael D. Ross and Elizabeth G. Fontenot

Context:

The standing heel-rise test has been recommended as a means of assessing calf-muscle performance. To the authors' knowledge, the reliability of the test using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) has not been reported.

Objective:

To determine the test-retest reliability of the standing heel-rise test.

Design:

Single-group repeated measures.

Participants:

Seventeen healthy subjects.

Settings and Infevention:

Each subject was asked to perform as many standing heel raises as possible during 2 testing sessions separated by 7 days.

Main Outcome Measures:

Reliability data for the standing heel-rise test were studied through a repeated-measures analysis of variance, ICC2, 1 and SEMs.

Results:

The ICC2,1 and SEM values for the standing heel-rise test were .96 and 2.07 repetitions, respectively.

Conclusions:

The standing heel-rise test offers clinicians a reliable assessment of calfmuscle performance. Further study is necessary to determine the ability of the standing heel-rise test to detect functional deficiencies in patients recovering from lower leg injury or surgery

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Robert C. Manske, Barbara Smith and Frank Wyatt

Context:

Athletes are often examined for return to sports using a functional-testing algorithm. No research has determined whether a closed kinetic chain (CKC) isokinetic testing bout influences the reliability of functional tests.

Objective:

To determine whether a concentric CKC isokinetic test bout alters test–retest reliability of lower extremity functional testing.

Design:

Subjects participated in velocity-spectrum CKC isokinetic bouts on 2 days 1 week apart.

Setting:

Hospital-based clinic.

Participants:

28 normal subjects (mean age 26.7 years, height 27.2 cm, weight 75.8 kg).

Analysis and Results:

Means and SDs were determined. Intraclass correlation coefficients were used to calculate test–retest reliability and between days 1 and 2 ranged from .91 to .98.

Conclusions:

Even after a CKC isokinetic test bout, test–retest reliability of functional tests is very high. Future research should determine test–retest reliability of functional tests for patients with lower extremity pathology.

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Todd G. Goldbeck and George J. Davies

Context:

Functional testing of patients is essential to clinicians because it provides objective data for documentation that can be used for serial reassessment and progression through a rehabilitation program. Furthermore, new tests should require minimal time, space, and money to implement.

Purpose:

To determine the test-retest reliability of the Closed Kinetic Chain (CKC) Upper Extremity Stability Test.

Participants:

Twenty-four male college students.

Methods:

Each subject was tested initially and again 7 days later. Each subject performed 1 submaximal test followed by 3 maximal efforts. A 45-second rest was given after each 15-second test. The 2 maximal-test scores were averaged and compared with those from the retest.

Results:

The intraclass correlation coefficient was .922 for test-retest reliability. A paired-samples t test (.927) was conducted, and the coefficient of stability was .859. The results indicate that the CKC Upper Extremity Stability Test is a reliable evaluation tool.

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John R. Sirard, Ann Forsyth, J. Michael Oakes and Kathryn H. Schmitz

Background:

The purpose of this study was to determine 1) the test-retest reliability of adult accelerometer-measured physical activity, and 2) how data processing decisions affect physical activity levels and test-retest reliability.

Methods:

143 people wore the ActiGraph accelerometer for 2 7-day periods, 1 to 4 weeks apart. Five algorithms, varying nonwear criteria (20 vs. 60 min of 0 counts) and minimum wear requirements (6 vs. 10 hrs/day for ≥ 4 days) and a separate algorithm requiring ≥ 3 counts per min and ≥ 2 hours per day, were used to process the accelerometer data.

Results:

Processing the accelerometer data with different algorithms resulted in different levels of counts per day, sedentary, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Reliability correlations were very good to excellent (ICC = 0.70−0.90) for almost all algorithms and there were no significant differences between physical activity measures at Time 1 and Time 2.

Conclusions:

This paper presents the first assessment of test-retest reliability of the Actigraph over separate administrations in free-living subjects. The ActiGraph was highly reliable in measuring activity over a 7-day period in natural settings but data were sensitive to the algorithms used to process them.