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Jensen Moore, Ashley Hesson, and Khristen Jones

This research examined how NBC Universal’s coverage of the Olympic final for the women’s gymnastics teams influenced the news media’s and public’s perceptions of the event. Guided by framing and social construction of reality, the authors conducted a thematic analysis on 487 textual items from mainstream-news and social-media sites. Major themes found were creating drama, caring about ratings/money, crossing ethical lines, embarrassing other media, and following news routines. The analysis indicated that audience members did not prefer the edited version of events. Although incomplete coverage shaped viewers’ perceived reality, many used alternative resources to form an accurate understanding of reality.

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Dana K. Voelker and Justine J. Reel

interview. These member reflections were included in subsequent data analysis ( Smith & McGannon, 2018 ). Braun’s and Clarke’s ( 2006 ) inductive thematic analysis was used to identify patterns across the data. Initially, the researchers familiarized themselves with the data by rereading transcripts and

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Laura Misener, Simon Darcy, David Legg, and Keith Gilbert

Over the last decade a great deal of work has examined major sport event legacies and event leverage. Much of this work has involved Olympic studies and this paper seeks to add to the body of knowledge surrounding major sport event legacies by examining the largely overlooked area of the Paralympic Games. The Paralympic Games are the second largest multisport event after the Olympic Games depending upon which parameters are used and since Sydney 2000 there has been an ‘operational partnership’ where bid cities are required to host both Games. Yet, few studies have evaluated the comparative outcomes, legacies and event leverage that Paralympic games have generated. This paper addresses this absence by conducting a thematic analysis of Paralympic legacy research. The thematic analysis used a combination of keywords involving event legacy across 13 major academic databases. Of the 43 articles identified as having Paralympic legacy related content only 13 articles empirically investigated Paralympic legacy. In reviewing the research, it is noted that the bulk of the research has focused on Summer Paralympic Games with little interest in the Winter Paralympic Games. The major findings for legacy-based research include: infrastructure; sport; information education, and awareness; human capital; and managerial changes. However, while these findings may seem congruent with major event legacies frameworks conceptually, an examination of the detailed findings shows that Paralympic legacy research is isomorphic and adds a new component to existing legacy dimensions.

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Cecilie Thøgersen-Ntoumani, Anthony Papathomas, Jonathan Foster, Eleanor Quested, and Nikos Ntoumanis

recorder and transcribed verbatim. Data Analysis Interview transcripts were subject to a thematic analysis, a popular approach in psychology for interpreting qualitative data by identifying core patterns of meaning. We were guided by the form of thematic analysis described by Braun, Clarke, and Weate

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Florence Lebrun, Àine MacNamara, Dave Collins, and Sheelagh Rodgers

). Patterns of data were defined, examined, and reported without being embedded in any established theoretical framework. Thematic analysis can be a realist or a constructionist method ( Braun & Clarke, 2006 ). For the present study, a realist approach focusing on participants’ experience, meaning, and

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Qingru Xu and Andrew C. Billings

during the 2017 ping-pong boycott. Method Thematic analysis, “a method for identifying, analyzing, and reporting patterns (themes) within data” ( Braun & Clarke, 2006 , p. 6) was used to explore the gatekeeping strategies of mainland Chinese media during coverage of the ping-pong protest. Both flexible

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Michael L. Naraine and Milena M. Parent

The purpose of this study was to examine sport organizations’ social-media activity using an institutional approach, specifically, to investigate the main themes emanating from Canadian national sport organizations’ (CNSOs) social-media communication and the similarities and differences in social-media use between the CNSOs. An exploratory qualitative thematic analysis was conducted on 8 CNSOs’ Twitter accounts ranging from 346 to 23,925 followers, with the number of tweets varying from 219 to 17,186. Thematic analysis indicated that CNSOs generally used tweeting for promoting, reporting, and informing purposes. Despite the organizations’ differing characteristics regarding seasonality of the sport, Twitter-follower count, total number of tweets, and whether the content was original or retweeted, themes were generally consistent across the various organizations. Coercive, mimetic, and normative isomorphic pressures help explain these similarities and offer reasons for a lack of followership growth by the less salient CNSOs. Implications for research and practice are provided.

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Katie Teller, Mark Abbey-Lambertz, Nasira Sharma, Alan Waite, Scott Ickes, and Jason A. Mendoza

had ended. Mean interview time, which has been adjusted for additional time needed for interpretation, was 13.6 minutes. Parent interviews were transcribed verbatim. Using thematic analysis, 16 2 trained staff members independently coded the interviews and extracted quotes fitting into predetermined

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Dana K. Voelker and Justine J. Reel

In this study, the authors examined female competitive figure skaters’ experiences of weight pressure in sport. Perceptions of the ideal skating body; sources of weight pressure; ways that body image, weight-management behaviors, and athletic performance have been affected; and recommendations for improving body image were explored. Aligning with a social constructivist view (Creswell, 2014), data were analyzed using an inductive thematic approach (Braun & Clarke, 2006). Skaters described the ideal skating body in an inflexible fashion with little room for deviation and acceptance of body diversity. Skaters cited their first weightpressure experience between 7 and 14 years of age, which most notably involved coaches, parents, skating partners, and other aspects of the skating culture. These experiences were characterized as promoting body-image concerns, unhealthy weight-management strategies, and interference with the psychological aspects of on-ice performance. Results from this study demonstrate the need to construct and maintain body-positive skating environments.

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Margo E.K. Adam, Abimbola O. Eke, and Leah J. Ferguson

to clarify and add detail to the conversations. The second step was to analyze the transcripts (and field notes) with three distinct approaches: holistic analysis, functional analysis, and conceptually driven thematic analysis. Holistic analysis is an in-depth and detailed examination of the case