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Natallie Robello

Column-editor : Robert D. Kersey

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Jennifer A. Stone

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Linda M. Gazzillo and David A. Middlemas

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Katherine L. Helly, Katherine A. Bain, Phillip A. Gribble and Matthew C. Hoch

Clinical Scenario: Patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI) demonstrate deficits in both sensory and motor function, which can be objectively evaluated through static postural control testing. One intervention that has been suggested to improve somatosensation and, in turn, static postural control is plantar massage. Clinical Question: Does plantar massage improve static postural control during single-limb stance in patients with CAI relative to baseline? Summary of Key Findings: A search was performed for articles exploring the effect of plantar massage on static postural control in individuals with CAI. Three articles were included in this critically appraised topic including 1 randomized controlled trial and 2 crossover studies. All studies supported the use of plantar massage to improve static postural control in patients with CAI. Clinical Bottom Line: There is currently good-quality and consistent evidence that supports the use of plantar massage as an intervention that targets the somatosensory system to improve static postural control in patients with CAI. Future research should focus on incorporating plantar massage as a treatment intervention during long-term rehabilitation protocols for individuals with CAI. Strength of Recommendation: In agreement with the Center of Evidence-Based Medicine, the consistent results from 2 crossover studies and 1 randomized controlled trial designate that there is level B evidence due to consistent, moderate- to high-quality evidence.

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Zachary K. Winkelmann, Ethan J. Roberts and Kenneth E. Games

-rich blood to the hamstring in this study may have resulted in the significant increase in PSLR. Previous research on massage identified that the mechanism of this intervention promotes oxygen delivery. 34 The methods of DOT mimic that of therapeutic massage without the external pressure from the clinician

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6 6 3 3 Guest Editorial Quality of Life in Athletic Training: A Look Forward Luzita Vela MS, AT 5 2001 6 6 3 3 4 4 4 4 10.1123/att.6.3.4 Research Therapeutic Massage Techniques for Three Common Injuries Linda M. Gazzillo EdD, ATC, LMT David A. Middlemas EdD, ATC, CMT 5 2001 6 6 3 3 5 5 9 9 10

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and Rehabilitation The Rationale for Therapeutic Massage Jennifer A. Stone MS, ATC 7 1999 4 4 4 4 26 26 26 26 10.1123/att.4.4.26 Continuing Education Assessment Advances in Shoulder Injury Care Neil Curtis EdD, ATC 7 1999 4 4 4 4 32 32 33 33 10.1123/att.4.4.32 Back to Basics The Rehab Tree, a

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10.1123/att.12.3.19 At Education Developing Computer Simulations for Student Assessment Malissa Martin EdD, ATC, CSCS Jolene M. Henning EdD, LAT, ATC Michelle Lesperance MS, LAT, ATC Jane D. Harris PhD 5 2007 12 12 3 3 23 23 26 26 10.1123/att.12.3.23 Book Reviews Therapeutic Massage Robert D

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Kayla E. Boehm, Blaine C. Long, Mitchell T. Millar and Kevin C. Miller

68% of clinicians indicated they would use KTT in their practice if they felt it provided a psychological benefit. A treatment may still be useful clinically even if the literature refutes its physiological benefits. This is supported by investigations on the use of therapeutic massage. 32 When

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Sara J. Golec and Alison R. Valier

, better function, and fewer days missed from work. 9 Further, there is a lack of high quality, consistent evidence regarding the effectiveness of therapeutic ultrasound, electrical stimulation, thermotherapy, therapeutic massage, mechanical traction and EMG biofeedback on outcomes for patients with low