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Liam Kennedy, Derek Silva, Madelaine Coelho, and William Cipolli III

Humboldt, where Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe, hockey personality Don Cherry, current and former National Hockey League (NHL) players, and several hundred-people crowded to pay their respects. Moments of tragedy, such as the Humboldt Broncos bus crash, can provide impetus

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Dwight H. Zakus

Many IOC actions have led to results that could be described as tragedy and farce. By comparing the presidency of Pierre de Coubertin with that of Avery Brundage, and comparing the decisions made in the denial of Jim Thorpe’s victories with the suspension of Karl Schranz, it is possible to see examples of tragedy and farce in the history of the Olympic movement. Further, it becomes possible to see how some of these actions and decisions have become hypocritical. The notion of hypocrisy is contained in Hoberman’s idea of “amoral universalism.” Several times the IOC has had to reverse its decisions regarding athletes. These decisions have resulted from hypocritical actions of the IOC in its attempt to maintain its version of Olympism as the guiding philosophy of the Olympic movement. The recent events surrounding Ben Johnson exemplify how the “amoral universalism,” and consequently the hypocrisy inherent in the Olympic movement, continue to affect the direct producers of Olympic performances.

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C. Vivian Stringer and Lynda Ransdell

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Welch Suggs and Theresa Walton

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Laura Richardson Walton and Kevin D. Williams

An organization’s initial response to a crisis can dictate the tone of its sustained response throughout the crisis, as well as stakeholders’ reactions to the incident. When news of the deaths of professional wrestler Chris Benoit, his wife, and their 7-yr-old son broke, World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) immediately paid tribute to the superstar. A memorial show to Benoit’s career aired as investigators searched the family’s home. The investigation revealed that Benoit murdered his wife and son before taking his own life, resulting in WWE’s retraction of its earlier tributes. Furthermore, the organization had to respond to the swarm of speculation that steroids—and WWE’s lax policy on their use—were to blame. This case study analyzes WWE’s immediate response strategies to their employee’s family’s deaths and the subsequent strategies used on learning that the employee was implicated. Qualitative analysis of corporate documents and official statements seeks to provide direction regarding how similar organizations should respond in the days immediately after tragic events when employees may be implicated.

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Adam Ehsan Ali

killed after their van collided with a semitrailer truck outside of Bathurst, New Brunswick, in 2008 ( CBC News, 2008 ). The reaction to this story was dwarfed by the more sustained, profound response to the Humboldt tragedy. The crash led to a nation-wide outpouring of grief and mourning, which included

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Dino Numerato and Arnošt Svoboda

) celebration of local heroes; the creation and maintenance of (d) museums and histories; and (e) remembrance of tragedies and traumas. We argue that these football sites of memory represent significant objects of symbolic resistance that constitute part of the broader struggle over the nature of contemporary