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Emmanuel Chiebuka Okoye, Christopher Olusanjo Akosile, Fatai Adesina Maruf, Ifeoma Uchenna Onwuakagba, and Victoria Chinonye Chukwuma

, & Pappadis, 2010 ). Cross-cultural adaptation, a process that looks at both language (translation) and cultural adaptation issues in the process of preparing a questionnaire for use in another setting involves translation, synthesis, back translation, expert committee review, and pretesting. It aims to

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Niek Pot, Margaret E. Whitehead, and Elizabeth J. Durden-Myers

the concept ( Canadian Sport for Life, 2016 ; Pot & van Hilvoorde, 2013 ). These practices can explained, at least in part, by the critique that physical literacy has a strong philosophical base but lacks a clear translation into practice ( Jurbala, 2015 ; Longmuir & Tremblay, 2016 ; Whitehead

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Hebe Schaillée, Ramón Spaaij, Ruth Jeanes, and Marc Theeboom

Knowledge translation has emerged as an important area of research activity to enhance the fit between research-based knowledge and its application in policy and practice ( Greenhalgh & Wieringa, 2011 ). National competitive research funding schemes increasingly demand that applicants demonstrate

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Roger Baines

The intersection of professional translation in social media and the highly public-relations (PR)-conscious global industry/culture of soccer raises questions for both sport and communication studies and translation studies—questions about identity management and performance on social media

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Elizabeth G. Eakin, Ben J. Smith, and Adrian E. Bauman

Background:

This article evaluates the extent to which the literature on primary care-based physical activity interventions informs the translation of research into practice and identifies priorities for future research.

Methods:

Relevant databases were searched for: (1) descriptive studies of physician barriers to physical activity counseling (n = 8), and (2) reviews of the literature on primary care-based physical activity intervention studies (n = 9). The RE-AIM framework was used to guide the evaluation.

Results:

Lack of time, limited patient receptiveness, lack of remuneration, and limited counseling skills are the predominant barriers to physical activity counselling. Issues of internal validity (i.e., effectiveness and implementation) have received much more attention in the literature than have issues of external validity (i.e., reach and adoption).

Conclusions:

The research agenda for primary care-based physical activity interventions needs greater attention to the feasibility of adoption by busy primary care staff, generalizability, and dissemination.

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Dominique Banville, Pauline Desrosiers, and Yvette Genet-Volet

With the rise of cultural diversity in populations, researchers are faced with new issues, such as working with participants from other cultures that speak different languages. This research note presents a methodology developed by Vallerand (1989) in the psychological field that translates and validates questionnaires and inventories developed for a specific culture. This cross-cultural technique has seven steps and insures that the instrument will provide data that are valid and reliable in the targeted population. The seven steps are defined, and examples of results from a study using this methodology are provided.

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Karl Spiteri, Kate Grafton, John Xerri de Caro, and David Broom

used to assess PA behavior across different domains. The IPAQ has been translated into more than 20 different languages including Turkish, Serbian, Croatian, Nigerian, Malay, and French ( IPAQ group, 2019 ), but as yet has not been translated into the Maltese language. It is important that each

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Travis R. Bell and Victor D. Kidd

segregation across race and genre resurfaced within the music industry ( Cevallos, 2019 ). Linguistic Theory of Translation Boer and Fischer ( 2010 ) highlighted a need for understanding how music translates across cultures to help move musical research beyond an individualistic process to examine it as cross

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Masakazu Matsuoka, Hiroshi Kunimura, and Koichi Hiraoka

Humans respond to translation of the support surface under their feet in stance to maintain the center of pressure within the base of support (see Jacobs et al., 2008 ; Jacobs & Horak, 2007 ; Massion, 1994 ). This response is produced by activity of the limb and trunk muscles ( Horak & Nashner

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Katherine A. Stamatakis, Timothy D. McBride, and Ross C. Brownson

Background:

While effective interventions to promote physical activity have been identified, efforts to translate these interventions into policy have lagged behind. To improve the translation of evidence into policy, researchers and public health practitioners need to consider new ways for communicating health promoting messages to state and local policymakers.

Methods:

In this article, we describe issues related to the translation of evidence supporting physical activity promotion, and offer some communication approaches and tools that are likely to be beneficial in translating research to policy.

Results:

We discuss the use of narrative (ie, stories) and describe its potential role in improving communication of research in policy-making settings. In addition, we provide an outline for the development and design of policy briefs on physical activity, and for how to target these briefs effectively to policy-oriented audiences.

Conclusions:

Improvements in researchers' and practitioners' abilities to translate the evidence they generate into high-quality materials for policy makers can greatly enhance efforts to enact policies that promote physical activity.