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Noriaki Maeda, Yukio Urabe, Junpei Sasadai, Akira Miyamoto, Masahito Murakami and Junichi Kato

Context:

Whole-body-vibration (WBV) stimulus equipment has been used as a new training method for health promotion. Its use in the clinic has expanded to the field of sports and rehabilitation for disabled patients. WBV training is rapidly gaining popularity in health and fitness centers as an alternative method for improving muscle performance. Acute positive effects of WBV have been shown on lower-extremity muscle power and vertical-jump ability; however, there have not been any studies focusing on the long-term effects of WBV for trunk muscle and dynamic balance.

Objective:

To investigate the effects of an 8-wk program of WBV in combination with trunk-muscle training on muscle performance in healthy, untrained adults.

Design:

Laboratory-based, repeated-measures study.

Setting:

University laboratory.

Participants:

20 healthy university men.

Intervention:

Participants were randomly assigned to a WBV or non-WBV group. The WBV group performed a trunk-muscle-training program in combination with WBV; the non-WBV group performed the same muscle-training program without WBV for 8 wk.

Main Outcome Measures:

In the pre- and posttraining period, the participants were evaluated using the Functional Movement Screen (FMS), Y Balance Test (Y-test) (anterior, posteromedial, and posterolateral reach), trunk-muscle isometric strength (flexor, extensor, and flexor:extensor ratio), squat jump, and countermovement jump.

Results:

The WBV group had greater improvement than the non-WBV group in both trunk-flexor muscle strength (P = .02) and the Y-test (anterior reach) (P = .004) between pre- and posttraining.

Conclusion:

Adding WBV to a trunk-muscle-strengthening program may improve trunk-flexor isometric strength and anterior reach during the Y-test more than training without WBV. The WBV protocol used in this study had no significant impact on FMS scores, squat jumping, countermovement jumping, trunk-extensor isometric strength, or trunk flexor:extensor ratio.

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Hiromune Obayashi, Yukio Urabe, Yuki Yamanaka and Ryo Okuma

Design:

Randomized controlled study.

Setting:

Laboratory.

Participants:

26 healthy swimmers randomly assigned to an exercise (n = 13; Ex) or control group (n = 13; Cont).

Intervention:

The Ex group performed respiratory-muscle exercises for 10 min thrice a week for 4 wk.

Context:

Respiratory-muscle exercises are used not only in the rehabilitation of patients with respiratory disease but also in endurance training for athletes. Respiration involves the back and abdominal muscles. These muscles are 1 of the elements responsible for posture control, which is integral to injury prevention and physical performance. However, the effects of respiratory-muscle exercise on posture remain unclear.

Objective:

To examine the potential of respiratory-muscle exercise for improving posture.

Main Outcome Measures:

Spinal curvature, pulmonary function, and trunk-muscle strength were measured for both the groups at baseline and after 4 wk. The data were compared between the Ex and Cont groups with Mann–Whitney U test and preintervention and postintervention within groups with a Wilcoxon signed rank-sum test.

Results and Conclusion:

The spinal curvature was significantly different in the Ex group, indicating a decrease in the thoracic (−13.1%, P < .01) and lumbar (−17.7%, P < .05) angles. The Ex group presented with lower thoracic (−8.6%) and lumbar (−20.9%) angles at postexercise than the Cont group (P < .05). With respect to trunk-muscle strength, only trunk-flexion strength significantly increased from pretest to posttest in the Ex group (P < .05). For pulmonary function, forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1.0 s were significantly increased after 4 wk in the Ex group (P < .05). The results suggest that respiratory-muscle exercise straightened the spine, leading to good posture control, possibly because of contraction of abdominal muscles.

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Billy Chun-Lung So, Calvin Hong-Nin Yuen, Ken Long-Hin Tung, Sheena Lam, Sammy Lan Cheng, Zina Wing-Lam Hung, Rainy Wai-Kwan Leung and Grace Pui-Yuk Szeto

and whether DWR could be a trunk muscle training method. The technique described in Figure  3 for waterproofing the electrodes should facilitate future EMG investigations in aquatic environments with lower cost and higher efficiency. During these experiments, the participants were tethered to the end

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Kunal Bhanot, Navpreet Kaur, Lori Thein Brody, Jennifer Bridges, David C. Berry and Joshua J. Ode

stability after ankle sprain . J Med Assoc Thai . 2005 ; 88 ( suppl 4) : S90 – S94 . 16623010 17. Ganesh GS , Chhabra D , Pattnaik M , Mohanty P , Patel R , Mrityunjay K . Effect of trunk muscles training using a star excursion balance test grid on strength, endurance and disability in